Dhemaji district

Dhemaji district (Pron:deɪˈmɑ:ʤi or di:ˈmɑ:ʤi) is an administrative district in the state of Assam in India. The district headquarters are located at Dhemaji. The district occupies an area of 3237 km² and has a population of 686,133 (as of 2011). Main Religions are Hindus 548,780, Muslims 10,533, Christians 6,390.

Dhemaji district
The Brahmaputra River
Dhemaji district's location in Assam
Dhemaji district's location in Assam
CountryIndia
StateAssam
DivisionUpper Assam
HeadquartersDhemaji
Area
 • Total3,237 km2 (1,250 sq mi)
Population
(2011)
 • Total686,133
 • Density210/km2 (550/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+05:30 (IST)
ISO 3166 codeIN-AS-DM
Websitehttp://dhemaji.nic.in/

Etymology

The district's name "Dhemaji' is derived from the Deori-Chutia word "Dema-ji" which means "great water" indicating it to be a flood-prone region.[1]

History

The areas of the present district was part of the greater Ahom Kingdom and Chutiya kingdom along with Lakhimpur, Tinsukia, Jorhat, Dibrugarh and Sonitpur district from the 12th century to the 16th century until the Ahom-Chutiya war during the early period of the 16th century. Ruins of the erstwhile capital are still there but not well preserved. A number of monuments Ghuguha Dol, Ma Manipuri Than, Padumani Than built by the Ahom kings are worth visiting.

Dhemaji became a fully-fledged district on 14 October 1989 when it was split from Lakhimpur district.[2]

Geography

Dhemaji district occupies an area of 3,237 square kilometres (1,250 sq mi),[3] comparatively equivalent to Solomon Islands' Makira Island.[4] It is one of the most remote districts of India, at the easternmost part of Assam. Situated in the foothills of the lower Himalayas it is relatively a small town.

Being in a confluence of rivers with the mighty Brahmaputra river flanking the district and its numerous tributaries running through the district, the region is perennially affected by floods.

The heart of Dhemaji district is Dhemaji Mouza (an area demarcated by the British regime for the purpose of tax collection, equivalent to a taluk or pargana in the pan-Indian context). Secondly, Silapathar & Sissi Borgaon are the main business place of Dhemaji.The Bogibil project is running nearest to these places.

Education

Lower and Upper primary school:

  • Bhairabpur Netaji M.E. School — Assamese Medium School, Located at Bhairabpur, Silapathar, Established in 1975|date=August 2016}}

Economy

In 2006 the Indian government named Dhemaji one of the country's 250 most backward districts (out of a total of 640).[5] It is one of the eleven districts in Assam currently receiving funds from the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme (BRGF).[5]

Divisions

There are two Assam Legislative Assembly constituencies in this district: Dhemaji and Jonai.[6] Both are designated for scheduled tribes.[6] They make up a part of the Lakhimpur Lok Sabha constituency.[7] Dhemaji district is politically very poor. Community politics is main reason for this. Very less funds have been released for the financial year 2012-2013.As of 2013, Rani Narah is MP (Member of Parliament), Sumitra Patir is MLA from Dhemaji and Pradan Baura from Jonai.[8] On 2016, Pradan Barua is MLA from dhemaji.

Demographics

According to the 2011 census Dhemaji district has a population of 688,077,[9] roughly equal to the nation of Equatorial Guinea[10] or the US state of North Dakota.[11] This gives it a ranking of 504th in India (out of a total of 640).[9] The district has a population density of 213 inhabitants per square kilometre (550/sq mi) .[9] Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 20.3%.[9] Dhemaji has a sex ratio of 949 females for every 1000 males,[9] and a literacy rate of 69.07%.[9]

The district is inhabited by indigenous Assamese people which include — Bodo, Chutiya Kachari, Ahom, Sonowal Kacharis, Koch Kachari, Kalita, Keots(Kaibartas), Mishing, Tiwa (Lalung) and Deori. Also there are the migrant Gorkha and Hindu and Muslim Bengalis.

Township Areas

Flora and fauna

In 1996 Dhemaji district became home to the Bardoibum-Beelmukh Wildlife Sanctuary, which has an area of 11 km2 (4.2 sq mi).[12] It shares the park with Lakhimpur district.

References

  1. ^ Brown, W.B. An Outline of the Deori-Chutia language. Assam secretariat printing office,1895, p. 70.
  2. ^ Law, Gwillim (2011-09-25). "Districts of India". Statoids. Retrieved 2011-10-11.
  3. ^ Srivastava, Dayawanti et al. (ed.) (2010). "States and Union Territories: Assam: Government". India 2010: A Reference Annual (54th ed.). New Delhi, India: Additional Director General, Publications Division, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting (India), Government of India. p. 1116. ISBN 978-81-230-1617-7.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)
  4. ^ "Island Directory Tables: Islands by Land Area". United Nations Environment Program. 1998-02-18. Retrieved 2011-10-11. Makira 3,190
  5. ^ a b Ministry of Panchayati Raj (September 8, 2009). "A Note on the Backward Regions Grant Fund Programme" (PDF). National Institute of Rural Development. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 5, 2012. Retrieved September 27, 2011.
  6. ^ a b "List of Assembly Constituencies showing their Revenue & Election District wise break - up" (PDF). Chief Electoral Officer, Assam website. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 26 September 2011.
  7. ^ "List of Assembly Constituencies showing their Parliamentary Constituencies wise break - up" (PDF). Chief Electoral Officer, Assam website. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 March 2012. Retrieved 26 September 2011.
  8. ^ "MEMBERS OF ASSAM LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY". Government of Assam, Directorate of Information & Public Relations. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f "District Census 2011". Census2011.co.in. 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-30.
  10. ^ US Directorate of Intelligence. "Country Comparison:Population". Retrieved 2011-10-01. Equatorial Guinea 668,225 July 2011 est.
  11. ^ "2010 Resident Population Data". U. S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-10-19. Retrieved 2011-09-30. North Dakota 672,591
  12. ^ Indian Ministry of Forests and Environment. "Protected areas: Assam". Archived from the original on August 23, 2011. Retrieved September 25, 2011.

External links

Coordinates: 27°28′47″N 94°33′04″E / 27.4798°N 94.5511°E

Dhemaji

Dhemaji (Pron: deɪˈmɑ:ʤi or di:ˈmɑ:ʤi) is the headquarters of Dhemaji district, Assam, India. It is one of the remote districts of Assam.

Dhemaji (Vidhan Sabha constituency)

Dhemaji (Vidhan Sabha constituency) is one of the 126 assembly constituencies of Assam a north east state of India. Dhemaji is also part of Lakhimpur Lok Sabha constituency. It is a reserved seat for the Scheduled tribes (ST).

Dhemaji railway station

Dhemaji railway station is a main railway station in Dhemaji district, Assam. Its code is DMC. It serves Dhemaji town. The station consists of two platforms.

Dilip Kumar Saikia

Dilip Kumar Saikia is an Asom Gana Parishad politician from Assam. He was elected in Assam Legislative Assembly election from 1985 to 2001 from Dhemaji constituency. He was expired on 9 December 2016.

Dimow

Dimow is a Medium-sized Town in Sissiborgaon tehsil, Dhemaji district in the Indian state of Assam. It is situated at a distance of 48 km from its district headquarters Dhemaji and 16 km from nearest city Silapathar.

Jonai

Jonai (Assamese: জোনাই) is a sub-division of Dhemaji District in the state of Assam in India.

Jonai Bazar

Jonai Bazar is a census town in Dhemaji district in the Indian state of Assam.

Kulajan

kulajan is a village and a village area in Dhemaji district in the Indian state of Assam. The village is situated on the northern bank of the Brahmaputra River, and is located approximately 493 kilometres from the city of Guwahati and just 13 km from Arunachal Pradesh.

National Highway 15B starts at Kulajan and connects it to Dibrugarh.

Lakhimpur (Lok Sabha constituency)

Lakhimpur Lok Sabha constituency is one of the 14 Lok Sabha constituencies in Assam state in north-eastern India.

Lakhimpur district

Lakhimpur ( LAK-im-POOR) is an administrative district in the state of Assam in India. The district headquarter is located at North Lakhimpur. The district is bounded on the North by Siang and Papumpare District of Arunachal Pradesh and on the East by Dhemaji District and Subansiri River. Majuli District stands on the Southern side and Biswanath District is on the West.

Murkongselek

Murkongselek is a village in Assam. It is located in the north-eastern part of Dhemaji district, 42 km from Pasighat in Arunachal Pradesh. Tourist attractions are located nearby in Mohmora, Jonai and Silapathar. The village also has a railway station. It is around 540 km from Guwahati. Nearest airport is Mohanbari Airport, Dibrugarh.

Murkongselek railway station

Murkongselek railway station is a main railway station in Dhemaji district, Assam. Its code is MZS. It serves Murkongselek town. The station consists of three platforms. The station has been upgraded to a standard Class III Station.

Pradan Baruah

Pradan Baruah is an Indian politician who is member of Parliament and elected to 16th Lok Sabha from Lakhimpur seat since November 2016. He won the bye-election in November 2016, after the seating member Sarbananda Sonowal resigned from the seat in May 2016 after becoming the Chief Minister of Assam. He was earlier the member of Assam Legislative Assembly from Dhemaji Assembly constituency ( no 113) in Dhemaji district.

He is a member of Bharatiya Janata Party. Previously, Baruah was member of Indian National Congress but defected from Congress before the assembly election along with Himanta Biswa Sarma in 2016.

Sati Sadhani

Sati Sadhani was the last queen of the Chutia dynasty. She was the daughter of the Chutiya King Dharmadhwajpal also known as Dhirnarayan. Born in Sadiya, she was married to Nityapal or Nitai.

In 1523, due to Nityapal's weak leadership, the Ahoms took advantage and attacked the kingdom at its weakest state, they conquered Sadiya and killed Nityapal. So Sadhani who played a prominent role in the fight against the Ahoms was asked to marry Sadiyakhowa Gohain, the Ahom governor of Sadiya. Sadhani preferred death to dishonour, and gave her life from the top of Chandragiri hills near Sadiya in 1524.

Silapathar

Silapathar is a city in Dhemaji district in the Indian state of Assam. The city is situated on the northern bank of the Brahmaputra River, and is located 470 kilometres from the city of Guwahati and just 9 km from Arunachal Pradesh.Historical Malinithan mandir is located on its subareas.

It is the commercial hub of Dhemaji district and Arunachal Pradesh, the place has a heady mix of indigenous Assamese people of Mishings and immigrants principally Nepali, Hindi

and Bengalis.

Sissiborgaon

Sissiborgaon is a village and tehsil of Dhemaji district, Assam state, India. Sissiborgaon is a populated developed village.

Sonowal Kacharis

The Sonowal Kacharis (Assamese language: সোনোৱাল কছাৰী ) are one of the Indigenous peoples, Assamese people of Northeast India. They belong to the Sino-Tibetan languages family and are closely associated with other Ethnic group of people of Assam which are commonly referred as Kirata, Kirati people or Kachari people (first classified by S Endle).

They practised the task of procuring, washing and activities related to gold jewelry. Due to distinct customs and dress and hymns and chants of Bihu as well as religious cerimonies and folklores we can clearly see how they are a part of Kachari (tribe) Community in Assam. They are predominantly inhabitants of Dhemaji district, Lakhimpur district, Tinsukia and Dibrugarh districts of Assam.

Sumitra Patir

Sumitra Patir is an Indian politician who is the member of Assam Legislative Assembly from Dhemaji Assembly constituency ( no 113) in Dhemaji district, as of 2013. She was Minister of State with Independent Charge in Tarun Gogoi government.

Tatibahar railway station

Tatibahar railway station is a main railway station in Lakhimpur district, Assam. Its code is TBH. It serves Tatibahar town. The station consists of three platforms.

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