Dexter Carter

Dexter Anthony Carter (born September 15, 1967) is a former running back who played for the San Francisco 49ers and the New York Jets in the National Football League. He was drafted in the first round in the 1990 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida State University.[1]

Dexter Carter
No. 35
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:September 15, 1967 (age 51)
Baxley, Georgia
Height:5 ft 9 in (1.75 m)
Weight:170 lb (77 kg)
Career information
High school:Baxley (GA) Appling Co.
College:Florida State
NFL Draft:1990 / Round: 1 / Pick: 25
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:1,042
Average:4.2
Rushing TDs:5
Receptions:61
Receiving yards:656
Receiving TDs:2
Player stats at NFL.com

NFL career

In 1990, Carter was drafted in the 1st round by the 49ers, the winner of the previous 2 Super Bowls, with the hopes of taking some of the running game responsibility from Roger Craig as well as serving as the primary kick returner. He led the team in rushing in his rookie season with 460 yards after Craig missed 5 games with injury.[2] He was the second-leading rusher in 1991 behind Keith Henderson, but then fell on the running back depth chart the following year and became almost exclusively a kick returner after that. He was a contributor in this capacity to the 49ers' Super Bowl XXIX team in 1994. In 1996, he was selected as a member of the 50th Anniversary 49er Modern Era All-Time Team.

In that after Super Bowl XXIX, he signed a free agent three-year contract with the Jets. He struggled on his new team, fumbling 7 times (losing 4) in 10 games before being cut on November 8. He was then picked up by the 49ers and resumed his role as their kick and punt returner the next week.[3] He created NFL history that season by becoming the only player ever to record at least one touch and one all purpose yard in 17 regular season games. He did this by playing for the Jets before their bye week and being signed by the 49ers after their bye week.

Carter finished his 7 NFL seasons with 1,042 rushing yards and 5 touchdowns, along with 59 receptions for 652 yards and 2 touchdowns. On special teams, he returned 138 punts for 1,358 yards and 2 touchdowns, while also returning 250 kickoffs for 5,412 yards and 2 touchdowns.

Coaching career

In 2007, Dexter returned to Florida State University as the running backs coach for 3 season. He was not retained after the 2009 season as incoming head coach Jimbo Fisher brought in his own coaches when taking over for Bobby Bowden.[4][5] Dexter Carter is now a co-offensive coordinator for Grovetown High School's football team.

Personal

Carter's cousin, Byron Buxton, is a professional baseball player. He was the second overall pick in the MLB draft. Both hail from Baxley Georgia.[6] His son, Dexter Carter Jr., has drawn comparisons to his father with his speed and natural football ability at the Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida.[7]Dexter is the Founder and Chairman for Dexter Carter 35 Foundation. dextercarter35foundation.org The mission is Making Hopes and Dreams a Reality for at risk youth experiencing despair, hardship and poverty.

References

  1. ^ "Player Bio: Dexter Carter". Seminoles.com. 1967-09-15. Retrieved 2010-11-01.
  2. ^ San Francisco 49ers. MVP Books. pp. 127–. ISBN 978-0-7603-4473-6.
  3. ^ https://www.nytimes.com/1995/11/09/sports/pro-football-after-ets-drop-carter-49ers-make-the-catch.html?n=Top%2fReference%2fTimes%20Topics%2fSubjects%2fF%2fFootball
  4. ^ Heather Dinich. "Source: Mark Stoops hired at Florida St".
  5. ^ "Florida State running backs coach Dexter Carter one of four Seminoles assistants who won't be back next season - Orlando Sentinel". Articles.orlandosentinel.com. 2009-12-08. Retrieved 2010-11-01.
  6. ^ http://www.twincities.com/sports/ci_22733682/minnesota-twins-grooming-nurturing-young-prospect-byron-buxton
  7. ^ http://www.firstcoastnews.com/sports/article/328257/14/Athlete-of-the-Week--Dexter-Carter-Jr-from-The-Bolles-School

External links

1989 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1989 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Bobby Bowden and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium.

1989 Southern Miss Golden Eagles football team

The 1989 Southern Miss Golden Eagles football team represented the University of Southern Mississippi in the 1989 NCAA Division I-A football season and were led by Brett Favre.

1990 Fiesta Bowl

The 1990 Sunkist Fiesta Bowl was the 19th edition of the Fiesta Bowl, played on January 1, in Tempe, Arizona. The game featured the sixth-ranked Nebraska Cornhuskers of the Big Eight Conference and the independent fifth-ranked Florida State Seminoles.

1990 NFL Draft

The 1990 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 22–23, 1990, at the Marriot Marquis in New York City, New York. The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

The Dallas Cowboys would have had the #1 overall pick in the draft for the second consecutive year by virtue of their league-worst 1–15 record in 1989. However, the Cowboys forfeited their first-round pick by selecting quarterback Steve Walsh in the first round of the previous year's supplemental draft. The first pick instead went to the Atlanta Falcons, who traded it to the Indianapolis Colts.

1990 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1990 San Francisco 49ers season was the franchise's 41st season in the National Football League and their 45th overall. the team entered the 1990 season heavily favoured to win their third consecutive Super Bowl. The season was highlighted by their defeat of the New York Giants on Monday Night Football in Week 13. Throughout the season, the 49ers and the Giants were the two best teams in the NFL. The two teams would meet again in the NFC Championship Game.

This was the season the 49ers debut the stitched up authentic name and numbers on jerseys.

Between 1988 and 1990, the 49ers set a league record with 18 consecutive road victories. Jerry Rice had a career year by becoming the fourth receiver in the history of American football to have at least 100 receptions in one season. The 49ers won their fifth consecutive NFC West Division Title. Dating back to 1989, the 49ers completed a fifteen-game unbeaten streak in the regular season (5 victories in the last 5 games of 1989 and 10 victories in the first ten games of 1990).

The 49ers were the closest team in NFL history to "three peat" in the Super Bowl, losing in the final seconds on a field goal by the Giants in the NFC Championship Game. The season ended on quite a haunting note, because the Giants' Leonard Marshall made a devastating hit on 49er quarterback Joe Montana, knocking him out of the game. Subsequent to this, Giant nose tackle Erik Howard fought through a double-team block by 49er center Jesse Sapolu and 49er guard Guy McIntyre to force 49er running back Roger Craig to fumble by getting his helmet on the football with only a few minutes left while the 49ers were driving to run out the game clock. Erik Howard dropped to one knee and managed to turn his shoulders perpendicular to the line of scrimmage in an effort to neutralize the double-team block. 49er guard Guy McIntyre released from the double-team block on Erik Howard in order to attempt a block on onrushing Giant inside linebacker Pepper Johnson allowing Erik Howard to knife through the protection and lay a hit on 49er running back Roger Craig. The ball was recovered by Giant outside linebacker Lawrence Taylor after he beat a block at the line of scrimmage by 49er tight end Brent Jones and a subsequent block by 49er fullback Tom Rathman to position himself just behind where Roger Craig was located along the line of scrimmage to catch the football after Giant nose tackle Erik Howard's hit forced it out of Craig's grasp. The Giants took over possession and began driving to kick the game-winning field goal. They ended up winning 15–13. The words of announcer Pat Summerall, "There will be no three-peat!" still haunt 49ers fans.

Following the 1990 season, the 49ers left team stalwarts Roger Craig and Ronnie Lott unprotected and let them go to the Los Angeles Raiders via Plan B free agency. Joe Montana would remain on the 49ers' roster for the next two seasons, but would never start another game for the 49ers.

1991 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1991 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 42nd year with the National Football League. The franchise did not qualify for the postseason for the first time since the strike-shortened 1982 season. Joe Montana would miss the entire season with an elbow injury, paving the way for Steve Young to take over as the team's starting quarterback.

In Week 17, the 49ers found themselves not controlling their destiny. The Atlanta Falcons had already swept the 49ers in 2 very close games in the regular season, and therefore held the tiebreaker in the wild card. The New Orleans Saints had a 10–5 record entering the week, and defeated the Phoenix Cardinals, winning the division.

1992 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1992 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 43rd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second time in three seasons. This would be the last season the Niners would have with Joe Montana. His last game as a 49er was on the December 28 MNF game against the Lions.

1993 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1993 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 44th year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive season and for the fifth time in six seasons. For the first time since 1978, Joe Montana was not on their active roster; specifically, the 49ers had traded him away to the Chiefs in April.

1996 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1996 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 51st since its inception. In commemoration, the 49ers wore a special 50th anniversary patch. They also wore a new uniform reminiscent of the 1994 throwback uniforms with white pants and shadowed numbers, but with a darker shade of red and an updated logo. The franchise tied for first place in the NFC West with a 12–4 record, but lost the division title to the Carolina Panthers on the division-record tiebreaker (the Panthers had swept the Niners in the season). The Niners were 3rd in the league in points scored and 4th in fewest points allowed.

Although the team was competitive the entire season, nagging and recurring injuries to offensive players and an inconsistent running game contributed to a what was considered a disappointing season. After a 14–0 Wild Card victory over the Philadelphia Eagles, the 49ers were defeated by the Green Bay Packers in the divisional playoffs 35–14. It would be George Seifert's final season as the 49ers' head coach and also the final San Francisco season for defensive coordinator Pete Carroll.

Adam Russell

Adam William Russell (born April 14, 1983) is an American former professional baseball pitcher.

In 2004, Russell was selected by the Chicago White Sox in the sixth round as the 179th overall pick.

Appling County High School

Appling County High School (formerly known as Appling County Comprehensive High School) is a high school in Baxley, Appling County, Georgia, United States. It is part of the Appling County School District.

It has approximately 1,000 students and 70 teachers in grades 9-12. The students are 66% white, 30% African-American, and 4% Hispanic. 62% of the school's students are eligible for free lunch, above the state average of 50%.

Baxley, Georgia

Baxley is a city in Appling County, Georgia, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 4,400. The city is the county seat of Appling County.

Byron Buxton

Byron Keiron Buxton (born December 18, 1993) is an American professional baseball center fielder for the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball (MLB). He was the second highest-rated prospect in baseball according to MLB.com and Baseball Prospectus in 2015.

Buxton attended Appling County High School in Baxley, Georgia. He was considered by some baseball analysts to be the most talented player available in the 2012 Major League Baseball Draft, and was selected as the second overall pick. He won Baseball America's Minor League Player of the Year Award in 2013. Buxton made his MLB debut in 2015 and he won the Gold Glove Award in 2017.

Clayton Richard

Clayton Colby Richard (born September 12, 1983) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Toronto Blue Jays of Major League Baseball (MLB). He previously played for the Chicago White Sox, San Diego Padres, and Chicago Cubs.

Hot Wheels (TV series)

Hot Wheels is a thirty-minute Saturday-morning cartoon series broadcast on ABC from 1969 to 1971, under the primary sponsorship of Mattel Toys.

List of New York Jets players

This is a list of players who have played for American football's New York Jets (1970–present) not including the New York Titans or any AFL players.

Rocky Gale

Rocky Gale (born February 22, 1988) is an American professional baseball catcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers of Major League Baseball (MLB). He attended the University of Portland where he was named the West Coast Conference defensive player of the year before being drafted by the San Diego Padres in the 2010 MLB draft. He made his MLB debut in 2015 for the Padres.

Sheldon Canley

Sheldon Lavell Canley (born April 19, 1968) is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League. He played professionally for the San Francisco 49ers and the New York Jets.

Super Bowl XXIX

Super Bowl XXIX was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion San Diego Chargers and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion San Francisco 49ers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1994 season. This is the only Super Bowl in history to be played between two teams from the same state. The 49ers defeated the Chargers by the score of 49–26, becoming the first team to win five Super Bowl championships. The game was played on January 29, 1995 at Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida (now part of the suburb of Miami Gardens, which became a separate city in 2003).

This game is regarded as 49ers quarterback Steve Young's final leap out of the shadow of his predecessor, Joe Montana, who had won four Super Bowls with the 49ers (in 1982, 1985, 1989, and 1990), two with Young as the backup quarterback. With Young at the helm, and a defense consisting of several veteran free agents who joined the team during the previous offseason, San Francisco finished the regular season with a league-best 13–3 record, and led the league in total points scored (505). The Chargers, on the other hand, were regarded as a "Cinderella" team, and advanced to their first Super Bowl after posting an 11–5 regular-season record and overcoming halftime deficits in both of their playoff wins.

This was the first Super Bowl in which both teams scored in all four quarters. The combined aggregate score of 75 points and the ten total touchdowns both remain Super Bowl records. Still, the 49ers controlled most of the game, with Young completing touchdown passes in each of the 49ers' first two drives. The Chargers were able to cut the deficit late in the first quarter, 14–7, on a 13-play, 78-yard drive, but could not slow down San Francisco afterwards. Young was named the Super Bowl MVP, throwing a Super Bowl-record six touchdown passes, and completing 24 out of 36 passes for 325 yards.

Despite the predicted blowout (18½ points is the largest margin a team has been favored by in a Super Bowl), the fact that San Diego did not have as much national appeal nor a relatively large core fan base, and two teams from California playing, which could have significantly diminished interest along the East Coast, the telecast of the game on ABC still had a Nielsen rating of 41.3.

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