Devonta Freeman

Devonta Freeman (born March 15, 1992) is an American football running back for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Falcons in the fourth round of the 2014 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida State.

Devonta Freeman
refer to caption
Freeman at Falcons' mini camp in 2018
No. 24 – Atlanta Falcons
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:March 15, 1992 (age 27)
Baxley, Georgia[1]
Height:5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight:206 lb (93 kg)
Career information
High school:Miami Central
(West Little River, Florida)
College:Florida State
NFL Draft:2014 / Round: 4 / Pick: 103
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Rushing yards:3,321
Rushing average:4.3
Rushing touchdowns:30
Receptions:198
Receiving yards:1,605
Receiving touchdowns:7
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school career

Freeman attended Miami Central High School in West Little River, Florida.[2] He helped lead the Rockets football team to the 2010 Class 6A state championship and was named the MVP after gaining 308 yards on 36 carries, falling just 20 yards shy of a state championship game record.[3] As a senior, he ran for a Miami-Dade County leading 2,208 yards and 26 touchdowns, and also recorded 663 rushing yards and six touchdowns in the final two games of the state playoffs.[4]

Considered a 4-star recruit by Rivals.com, he was rated the best running back in the nation. He committed to Florida State on June 24, 2010.[5]

College career

Freeman attended and played college football for Florida State from 2011–2013.[6]

2011 season

As a freshman at Florida State, Freeman immediately became a major contributor to the Seminoles' running game. In his collegiate debut against Louisiana-Monroe, he had 24 rushing yards and his first collegiate rushing touchdown.[7] On October 15, against Duke, he had 109 rushing yards and a touchdown.[8] In the next game against Maryland, he had 100 rushing yards and a touchdown.[9] In the next game, against North Carolina State, he was limited to only 17 rushing yards but had his third straight game with a rushing touchdown.[10] The next game, against Boston College, he had 62 rushing yards and two more rushing touchdowns.[11] In the in-state rivalry game against the Florida Gators, he had 44 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[12] He recorded 120 carries for 579 yards and eight touchdowns.[13]

2012 season

In the second game of his sophomore season, he had 69 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown against Savannah State.[14] On October 20, he had 70 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns against the Miami Hurricanes.[15] In the next game against Duke, he had 104 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[16] After a forgettable performance against Virginia Tech in which he had -5 rushing yards on seven carries, he had 148 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns against Maryland.[17][18] Florida State finished with a 10–2 regular season record and qualified for the conference championship game.[19] In the ACC Championship against Georgia Tech, he had 59 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 21–15 victory.[20] As a sophomore in 2012, he had 111 carries for 660 yards and eight touchdowns.[21]

2013 season

In the second game of the season, against Nevada, Freeman had 109 rushing yards and a touchdown.[22] In the next game against Bethune-Cookman, he had 112 rushing yards and a touchdown.[23] On October 5, against Maryland, he started a streak of ten straight games with a rushing touchdown.[24] On October 26, against North Carolina State, he had 92 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[25] In the next game, against Miami, he had 78 rushing yards and two more rushing touchdowns to go along with 98 receiving yards and receiving touchdown.[26] On November 23, against Idaho, he had 129 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[27] As a junior, Freeman was a first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) selection and helped the Florida State Seminoles win the 2014 BCS National Championship Game over Auburn by a score of 34–31.[28] He rushed for over 1,000 yards, the first Seminole to do so since Warrick Dunn in 1996.[29] Freeman finished the season with career highs in rushing yards (1,016), receiving yards (278), and touchdowns (15) despite splitting carries with James Wilder, Jr. and Karlos Williams in Florida State's backfield.[30] He led the Seminoles in rushing in each of his three seasons in Tallahassee.[31]

On January 11, 2014, Freeman announced he would forego his senior season and enter the 2014 NFL Draft.[32]

Career statistics

Devonta Freeman Rushing Receiving
Year Team Att Yards Avg Long TDs Rec Yards TDs
2011 Florida State 120 579 4.8 41 8 15 111 0
2012 Florida State 111 660 5.9 47 8 10 86 0
2013 Florida State 173 1,016 5.9 60 14 22 278 1
Career 404 2,255 5.6 60 30 47 475 1

Professional career

Freeman was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons in the fourth round (103rd overall) of the 2014 NFL Draft.[33] He was the eighth running back selected in the draft. As of 2017, he had more yards-from-scrimmage than any of them, second overall only to wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr.

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
5 ft 8 in
(1.73 m)
206 lb
(93 kg)
4.58 s 1.59 s 4.26 s 7.11 s 31.5 in
(0.80 m)
9 ft 10 in
(3.00 m)
All values from NFL Combine.[34]

2014 season: Rookie year

In his rookie season in 2014, Freeman shared touches with fellow running backs Steven Jackson, Jacquizz Rogers, and Antone Smith. Against the New Orleans Saints in Week 1 at the Georgia Dome, Freeman had two rushes for 15 yards and two receptions for 18 yards in his NFL debut.[35] Against the Detroit Lions in Week 8, he scored his first career touchdown, a seven-yard reception from Matt Ryan in the first quarter.[36] Against the New Orleans Saints in Week 16, he scored his first career rushing touchdown, a 31-yard rush in the third quarter.[37] He appeared in all 16 games during his rookie season but started none. In his rookie season, he accumulated 248 rushing yards on 65 carries, 225 receiving yards on 30 receptions, one rushing touchdown, and two receiving touchdowns.[38]

2015 season: Breakout season

Freeman started the 2015 season shaky. After recording just 18 rushing yards against the Philadelphia Eagles in the season opener on Monday Night Football and 25 rushing yards against the New York Giants, Freeman received his first career start on September 27, 2015 against the Dallas Cowboys. Against the Cowboys, Freeman had a breakout performance by rushing for a then career-high 141 yards and three touchdowns on 30 carries.[39] The next week, he rushed for three touchdowns again to go along with 68 rushing yards against the Houston Texans.[40] In the following game against the Washington Redskins, he rushed for a career-high 153 yards to start a three-game streak of 100 yard performances from Weeks 4-7.[41] In Week 11 against the Indianapolis Colts, Freeman recorded 43 yards off three carries before leaving in the first half with a concussion.[42] By the end of the season, Freeman totaled 1,634 yards-from-scrimmage (5th in the NFL), 14 all-purpose touchdowns (1st) with 1,056 rushing yards (7th)[43] and 11 rushing touchdowns (1st).[1] He also finished the 2015 season ranked third among NFL running backs in both receptions (73) and receiving yards (578) along with three receiving touchdowns.[44] Following the season, Freeman was selected to the Pro Bowl, the first of his career, and was named a Second-team All-Pro. Freeman was named one of the captains, along with Geno Atkins of the Cincinnati Bengals, for Team Irvin in the 2016 Pro Bowl.[45] He was ranked as the 50th best player in the NFL and the fifth best running back by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2016.[46]

2016 season: Super Bowl LI appearance

Devonta Freeman training camp 2016
Devonta Freeman training camp 2016

Freeman entered the 2016 season looking to advance on his successful season the year before. Freeman and Tevin Coleman would provide the Falcons with a solid running back combination in 2016. In Week 3, against the New Orleans Saints, he had 14 carries for 155 yards and five receptions for 55 yards and a touchdown.[47] The next week, against the Carolina Panthers, he scored his first rushing touchdown of the season in the 48–33 win.[48] In Week 12, against the Arizona Cardinals, he churned out 60 yards and two touchdowns on 15 carries in the 38–19 victory.[49] In the next game, a 29–28 loss to the Kansas City Chiefs, he had another two-touchdown performance on 15 carries for 56 yards.[50] In Week 15, Freeman ran for 139 yards on 20 carries for three touchdowns in a 41-13 win over the San Francisco 49ers, and was named NFC Offensive Player of the Week.[51] Freeman was named to his second consecutive Pro Bowl as an original selection behind Ezekiel Elliott and David Johnson, and played a huge role in the Falcons finishing with an 11–5 record and earning the #2 seed in the NFC. In the Divisional Round 36–20 victory over the Seattle Seahawks, Freeman had 14 carries for 45 yards and scored his first career postseason touchdown and also recorded four catches for 80 yards. In the NFC Championship 44–21 victory over the Green Bay Packers, Freeman recorded 14 carries for 42 yards and four receptions for 42 yards and scored his first career postseason receiving touchdown.[52] In Super Bowl LI, where the Falcons lost 34–28 in overtime to the New England Patriots, Freeman would have 11 carries for 75 yards, two receptions for 46 yards, and scored the first points for either team on a rushing touchdown in the second quarter.[53][54] Freeman was ranked as the 41st best player in the NFL and the sixth best running back by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017.[55]

2017 season

On August 9, 2017, Freeman signed a five-year, $41.25 million contract extension with the Falcons to become the highest paid running back in the NFL.[56] In Week 1, against the Chicago Bears, he was limited to 37 rushing yards on 12 carries but had a touchdown in the 23–17 victory.[57] In Week 2, in the 34–23 victory over the Green Bay Packers, he had 84 rushing yards and two touchdowns in the first game in the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium.[58] Freeman's first touchdown was the first ever touchdown in the history of the new stadium. In Week 3, against the Detroit Lions, he recorded 106 rushing yards and a touchdown.[59] Though splitting carries with Tevin Coleman, he scored five rushing touchdowns in the first four games to lead the NFL.[60] In Week 4, against the Buffalo Bills, he had 58 rushing yards and a touchdown for his fourth straight game with at least one in 2017.[61] Over the next six games, Freeman did not record a touchdown. That streak ended on Thursday Night Football in Week 14 against the New Orleans Saints. In the 20–17 victory, he had 24 carries for 91 yards and a touchdown.[62] In the next game, against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he had 22 carries for 126 yards and a touchdown in the 24–21 victory on Monday Night Football.[63] In the regular season finale against the Carolina Panthers, he had 23 rushing yards, 85 receiving yards, and a receiving touchdown in the 22–10 victory.[64] The Atlanta Falcons finished with a 10–6 record and made the playoffs.[65] Overall, Freeman finished with 865 rushing yards, seven rushing touchdowns, 36 receptions, 317 receiving yards, and one receiving touchdown in the 2017 season.[66] In the Wild Card Round, against the Los Angeles Rams, he had 66 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown in the 26–13 victory.[67] In the Divisional Round, he had a receiving touchdown in the 15–10 loss to the Philadelphia Eagles.[68] The touchdown marked Freeman's fifth consecutive postseason game with a touchdown.[69] He was ranked 70th by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2018.[70]

2018 season: Lost season

In Week 1, Freeman suffered a knee injury and missed the next three games. He returned in Week 5 before injuring his foot and experienced soreness in his groin. He missed the following week and was later revealed that Freeman required groin surgery. He was placed on injured reserve on October 16, 2018.[71][72]

Career statistics

Season Team Games Rushing Receiving Fumbles
GP GS Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2014 ATL 16 0 65 248 3.8 31T 1 30 225 7.5 36 1 1 1
2015 ATL 15 13 265 1,056 4.0 39 11 73 578 7.9 44 3 3 2
2016 ATL 16 16 227 1,079 4.8 75T 11 54 462 8.6 35 2 1 1
2017 ATL 14 14 196 865 4.4 44 7 36 317 8.8 29 1 4 1
2018 ATL 2 2 14 68 4.9 20 0 5 23 4.6 14 0 0 0
Career 63 45 767 3,316 4.3 75 30 198 1,605 8.1 44 7 9 5

Personal life

Freeman's jersey number is 24 in honor of his aunt Tamekia N. Brown, who died at the age of 24 from a heart attack when Freeman was 14.[73] He has her name tattooed on his left arm.

References

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  3. ^ Nawrocki, Nolan. "Devonta Freeman Combine Profile". NFL. Retrieved June 25, 2017.
  4. ^ Kaplan, Emily. "Devonta Freeman Has the Grit to Take on the World". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved February 13, 2018.
  5. ^ "Running Back Devonta Freeman Commits To Florida State".
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  52. ^ "NFL announces 2017 Pro Bowl rosters". NFL.com. December 20, 2016.
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  70. ^ NFL Top 100 Players of 2018: No. 70 Devonta Freeman
  71. ^ Patra, Kevin (October 16, 2018). "Falcons' Devonta Freeman to undergo groin surgery". NFL.com.
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External links

2011 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 2011 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University in the 2011 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. The Seminoles were led by second-year head coach Jimbo Fisher and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium. They were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, playing in the Atlantic Division.

Despite starting the season with a 2–3 record, the Seminoles finished the season 9–4, 5–3 in ACC play, to finish in a tie for second place in the Atlantic Division. They were invited to the Champs Sports Bowl where they defeated Notre Dame.

2012 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 2012 Florida State Seminoles football team, variously Florida State or FSU, represented Florida State University in the sport of American football during the 2012 NCAA Division I FBS football season. The Seminoles were led by third-year head coach Jimbo Fisher, and played their home games at Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee, Florida. They were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, playing in the Atlantic Division. 2012 marked the Seminoles' 21st season as a member of the ACC and their eighth in the ACC's Atlantic Division.

During the 2012 season, Florida State won its first ACC title since 2005, advancing to their first BCS bowl since that season as well, and won ten regular season games for the first time since the 2003 season. The Seminoles also won their first BCS game since the 2000 Sugar Bowl. The team also tied the school record for most games won in a single season set during that same season and also finished in the top ten of both major polls for the first time since the 2000 season.

2013 ACC Championship Game

The 2013 ACC Championship Game was the eighth football championship game for the Atlantic Coast Conference. It featured the Florida State Seminoles, winners of the ACC's Atlantic Division, and the Duke Blue Devils, winners of the ACC's Coastal Division. Duke is the first team other than Georgia Tech or Virginia Tech to represent the Coastal in the ACC Championship Game.

This was the game's fourth consecutive year at Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina.

A 45-7 Florida State win cemented a position for the Seminoles in the national championship game while Duke settled for the Chick-fil-A Bowl. Jameis Winston, quarterback of the Florida State Seminoles, accounted for four total touchdowns (3 passing, 1 rushing) and Devonta Freeman paced the rushing attack with 91 yards on 18 carries and a touchdown in the dominating victory.Florida State would go on to defeat Auburn in the national championship game on January 6, 2014.

2013 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 2013 Florida State Seminoles football team, variously Florida State or FSU, represented Florida State University in the sport of American football during the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS college football season. Florida State competed in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The Seminoles were led by fourth-year head coach Jimbo Fisher and played their home games at Bobby Bowden Field at Doak Campbell Stadium in Tallahassee, Florida. They were members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, and played in the Atlantic Division. It was the Seminoles' 22nd season as a member of the ACC and its ninth in the ACC Atlantic Division.

Led by eventual Heisman Trophy winner Jameis Winston, Florida State finished the season with a school-record fourteen wins and completed the school's third undefeated season. The Seminoles captured their seventeenth conference title and third national championship, earning the Grantland Rice Award, the MacArthur Trophy, the Associated Press Trophy and the AFCA National Championship Trophy.

In addition to the Heisman, Jameis Winston won the Walter Camp Award, the Davey O'Brien Award, and the Manning Award as well as being a finalist for the Maxwell Award and honored as the AP Player of the Year. Roberto Aguayo won the Lou Groza Award as the nation's best placekicker, Bryan Stork won the Rimington Trophy awarded to the nation's top center. Ten players were named All-Americans, with three earning consensus honors. For their accomplishments, Lamarcus Joyner was a finalist for both the Jim Thorpe Award and the Nagurski Trophy, and Coach Fisher was named the AFCA Coach of the Year and was a semifinalist for Maxwell Coach of the Year.

Twenty-six Seminoles from the national title team have gone on to play professional football with twenty-five players going on to play in the NFL, including four first round picks, and one player in the CFL. Nine players have been named consensus All-Americans.

2014 Atlanta Falcons season

The 2014 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's 49th season in the National Football League and the seventh under head coach Mike Smith. The Falcons were defeated by the Carolina Panthers in week 17, officially eliminating them from postseason contention for the second straight year. As a result, head coach Mike Smith was fired after his seventh year as coach, after two straight years with a losing record.The 2014 Atlanta Falcons were featured on the HBO documentary series Hard Knocks.

2014 BCS National Championship Game

The 2014 Vizio BCS National Championship Game was the national championship game of the 2013 college football season, which took place on Monday, January 6, 2014. The game featured the Auburn Tigers and Florida State Seminoles. It was the 16th and last time the top two teams would automatically play for the Bowl Championship Series (BCS) title before the implementation of a four-team College Football Playoff system. The game was played at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California, kicking off at 8:30 p.m. ET. The game was hosted by the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, the organizer of the annual Tournament of Roses Parade and the Rose Bowl Game on New Year's Day. The winner of the game, Florida State, was presented with the American Football Coaches Association's "The Coaches' Trophy", valued at $30,000. Pre-game festivities began at 4:30 p.m. PT. Face values of tickets were $385 and $325 (end zone seats) with both teams receiving a total of 40,000 tickets.

Starting immediately after the 2014 Rose Bowl Game, a fresh field was placed on top of the existing field. The field was laid on Thursday, and painting of the field began Friday. The field was completed Saturday in time for it to rest on Sunday for the game on Monday.Florida State scored first on a 35-yard field goal to take an early 3–0 lead. Auburn responded with a touchdown in the first quarter and two in the second to storm out to a 21–3 lead. After a successful punt fake, the Seminoles managed a touchdown late in the second quarter, making it a 21–10 game in Auburn's favor going into halftime. Both teams dominated on defense in the third quarter with the Seminoles hitting a field goal to cut Auburn's lead to eight. In the fourth quarter, Florida State scored a touchdown early to make it a one-point game. Auburn extended its lead to 24–20 on a field goal, but Florida State took the lead 27–24 when Levonte Whitfield took the ensuing kickoff 100 yards for a touchdown. Auburn then retook the lead 31–27 with 1:19 remaining in the game, but Florida State was able to respond, winning the game 34–31 with a Kelvin Benjamin touchdown with 13 seconds left on the clock.For their performances in the game, quarterback Jameis Winston and defensive back P. J. Williams were named the game's most valuable players.

2014 NFL Draft

The 2014 NFL draft was the 79th annual meeting of National Football League (NFL) franchises to select newly eligible football players to the league. The draft, officially the "Player Selection Meeting", was held at Radio City Music Hall in New York City, New York, on May 8th through May 10th, 2014. One of the most anticipated drafts in recent years kicked off on May 8, 2014 at 8 pm EDT. The draft was moved from its traditional time frame in late April due to a scheduling conflict at Radio City Music Hall.There was early discussion and rumors leading up to the draft on the future of staying at the current location in New York City, where it had been held since 1965. Given the increased interest the draft had garnered over the past decade, there was belief that the event may have outgrown Radio City Music Hall, which had been the venue for the past nine drafts. The possibility of extending the draft to four days was also being discussed throughout the months leading up to the draft. The NFL decided in that summer that the 2015 NFL Draft will take place at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, Illinois.

The Houston Texans opened the draft by selecting defensive end Jadeveon Clowney from the University of South Carolina. The last time a defensive player was taken with the first overall selection was in 2006, when the Texans selected Mario Williams. The Texans also closed the draft with the selection of safety Lonnie Ballentine of the University of Memphis as Mr. Irrelevant, which is the title given to the final player selected.The 2014 NFL draft made history when the St. Louis Rams selected Michael Sam in the seventh round. Sam, who became the first openly gay player to ever be drafted in the NFL, was selected 249th out of 256 picks in the 2014 NFL Draft. After this, Sam's jersey was the second best selling rookie jersey on the NFL's website. Sam came out publicly in the months leading up to the draft.A few notable players drafted in 2014 were Jimmy Garoppolo, Johnny Manziel, Derek Carr, Blake Bortles, Khalil Mack, Odell Beckham Jr., Aaron Donald, Anthony Barr, Allen Robinson, Jadeveon Clowney, Mike Evans, Devonta Freeman, Martavis Bryant, and Sammy Watkins.

2015 All-Pro Team

The 2015 All-Pro Teams were named by the Associated Press (AP), the Pro Football Writers of America (PFWA), the Sporting News (SN), for performance in the 2015 NFL season. While none of the All-Pro teams have the official imprimatur of the NFL (whose official recognition is nomination to the 2016 Pro Bowl), they are included in the NFL Record and Fact Book and also part of the language of the 2011 NFLPA Collective Bargaining Agreement. Any player selected to the first-team of any of the teams can be described as an "All-Pro." The AP team, with first-team and second-team selections, was chosen by a national panel of fifty NFL writers and broadcasters. The Sporting News All-NFL team is voted on by NFL players and executives and was released January 12, 2016. The PFWA team is selected by its more than 300 national members who are accredited media members covering the NFL.

2015 Atlanta Falcons season

The 2015 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's 50th season in the National Football League and the first under new head coach Dan Quinn.

The Atlanta Falcons started the season 5–0, their best start since 2012. However, the Falcons would struggle throughout the rest of the season by losing 8 of their remaining 11 games finishing at .500 for the first time in 10 years. After their Week 15 win at EverBank Field against the Jacksonville Jaguars, the Falcons managed to improve their record from last season. The highlight of the season was the team's Week 16 victory over their divisional rival Carolina Panthers who were 14-0 coming into the game and thus denying them a Perfect Season that would've made them the second team after the 2007 Patriots to go undefeated since the NFL expanded to a 16-game schedule.

2016 Pro Bowl

The 2016 Pro Bowl (branded as the 2016 Pro Bowl presented by USAA for sponsorship reasons) was the National Football League's all-star game for the 2015 season, which was played at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii on January 31, 2016.

Andy Reid of the Kansas City Chiefs and Mike McCarthy of the Green Bay Packers were selected to coach the teams due to their teams being the highest seeded teams from each conference to lose in the Divisional Round of 2015–16 NFL playoffs, which has been the convention since the 2010 Pro Bowl. On January 27, Mike McCarthy announced that he would not be coaching the Pro Bowl due to an illness and also announced that assistant head coach Winston Moss would take over head coaching duties. This was also the sixth consecutive year that the Pro Bowl took place prior to the Super Bowl. At the Pro Bowl Draft, the Chiefs' coaching staff was assigned to Team Rice, and the Packers' coaching staff was assigned to Team Irvin.The game continued the fantasy draft format that debuted with the 2014 Pro Bowl. The two teams were to be drafted and captained by two Hall of Famers, Jerry Rice (winning 2014 Pro Bowl captain) and Michael Irvin (winning 2015 Pro Bowl captain). Darren Woodson and Eric Davis served as defensive co-captains for Irvin and Rice respectively, in both cases reuniting two former teammates (Irvin and Woodson were teammates on the Dallas Cowboys from 1992 to 1999, while Rice and Davis played together with the San Francisco 49ers from 1990 to 1995). The Fantasy draft was held January 27 at 7:30 P.M. EST on ESPN2 at Wheeler Army Airfield in Wahiawa, Hawaii as part of an extension to the NFL's military appreciation campaign.

2019 Atlanta Falcons season

The 2019 Atlanta Falcons season will be the franchise's 54th season in the National Football League, their third playing their home games at Mercedes-Benz Stadium and their fifth under head coach Dan Quinn.

Bob Crenshaw Award

Bob Crenshaw Award is an annual award presented to a player on the Florida State University Football team to recognize individual performance. The awards are the typical of most athletic awards, such as Most Valuable Player and Defensive Seminole Warrior Awards. However, the Tallahassee Quarterback Club sponsors an award that is given in memory of a special Seminole football player whose courage and fighting spirit was an inspiration to others.

The award is given in the memory of Robert E. (Bob) Crenshaw who played Florida State Seminoles football from 1952 to 1955. The 175 pounds offensive lineman was the captain of the team in 1954 and a student leader. He was killed in a jet crash in 1958. The plaque's inscription reads: "To the football player with the Biggest Heart." The recipient is chosen by his teammates as the man who best exemplifies the qualities that made Bob Crenshaw an outstanding football player and person.

Dalvin Cook

Dalvin James Cook (born August 10, 1995) is an American football running back for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Florida State, where he finished his career as the school's all-time leading rusher. Cook was drafted by the Vikings in the second round of the 2017 NFL Draft.

Devonta

Devonta is a given name. Notable people with the given name include:

Devonta Freeman (born 1992), American football player

Devonta Glover-Wright (born 1992), American football player

Florida State Seminoles football statistical leaders

The Florida State Seminoles football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Florida State Seminoles football program in various categories, including passing, rushing, receiving, total offense, defensive stats, and kicking. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season, and career leaders. The Seminoles represent Florida State University in the NCAA's Atlantic Coast Conference.

Florida State began competing in intercollegiate football in 1947. This relatively recent start date means that, unlike many other teams, the Seminoles do not divide statistics into a "modern" era and a "pre-modern" era in which complete statistics are unavailable. Thus, all of the lists below potentially include players from as far back as 1947.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1947, seasons have increased from 10 games to 11 and then 12 games in length.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

Bowl games only began counting toward single-season and career statistics in 2002. The Seminoles have played in a bowl game every year since the decision, giving players an extra game to accumulate statistics each year since 2002.

Similarly, the Seminoles have played in the ACC Championship Game five times since it first occurred in 2005, giving players in those seasons an additional game to accumulate statistics.These lists are updated through the end of the 2017 season.

Matthew Thomas (linebacker)

Matthew Thomas (born July 21, 1995) is an American football linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Florida State. He signed with the Pittsburgh Steelers as an undrafted free agent in 2018.

Roundball Rock

"Roundball Rock" is a theme song composed by John Tesh and used for The NBA on NBC from 1990 until 2002. NBC played the song 12,000 times during their run. Tesh came up with the melody while at a hotel and called his answering machine at home to sing a preliminary version of the melody so he would not forget it. A more rock-oriented variant was introduced in 1997 to coincide with the debut of the WNBA. That theme was also used until 2002, and on NBC's WNBA telecasts only.

When ABC took over broadcasting rights for the National Basketball Association (NBA) from NBC, Tesh offered them the rights to also use his song, but they declined and chose to compose their own theme music instead. The theme is still memorable nearly two decades later, especially because of its association with the NBA's ascendance in the 1990s.

The song was revived in three ways in 2008 and 2016, with NBC using the music for commercial bumpers and starting lineup announcements during their coverage of basketball at the 2008 Summer Olympics and 2016 Summer Olympics that featured NBA players and Tesh releasing a free MP3 version on his website to commemorate the 2008 NBA Finals. This song was sampled by Nelly for his song "Heart of a Champion" from his studio album, Sweat, and compilation album Sweatsuit. "Roundball Rock" was also used in The Boondocks episode "Ballin'".

On April 13, 2013, Saturday Night Live parodied John Tesh pitching the theme song to NBC Sports executives. In this sketch, the song featured comical lyrics sung by John's fictional brother Dave.

A re-recording of the tune is used by Tesh as theme music for his syndicated radio show, as well as for the television series Intelligence for Your Life that Tesh co-hosts with his wife Connie Sellecca.

On September 17, 2017, NBC briefly played the song heading into a commercial break during a Sunday Night Football game, over a replay of a jump shot-themed touchdown celebration by Atlanta Falcons players Devonta Freeman and Andy Levitre.Fox Sports announced in December 2018 that it had acquired the rights to "Roundball Rock", which it will play for select college basketball broadcasts.In 2018, YouTube Sports Commentator UrinatingTree used the song as the intro to his segment of Tank Bowl, which is a game involving two teams trying to lose on purpose to get a higher draft pick.

Super Bowl LI

Super Bowl LI was an American football game played at NRG Stadium in Houston, Texas, on February 5, 2017, to determine the champion of the National Football League (NFL) for the 2016 season. The American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots, after trailing by as many as 25 points (28–3) during the third quarter, defeated the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Atlanta Falcons, 34–28 in overtime. The Patriots' 25-point comeback is the largest comeback in Super Bowl history, and Super Bowl LI was the first to be decided in overtime.The Patriots' victory was their fifth, moving them into a three-way tie with the Dallas Cowboys and the San Francisco 49ers for second place on the all-time Super Bowl wins list, trailing only the Pittsburgh Steelers who have six victories. New England, after finishing the regular season with a league-best 14–2 record, advanced to their record-setting ninth Super Bowl appearance, their second in three years, and their seventh under the leadership of head coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady. The Falcons entered the game after completing an 11–5 regular season record, and were trying to win their first Super Bowl title, having lost their only previous appearance in Super Bowl XXXIII.

After a scoreless first quarter, Atlanta scored 21 points before New England made a field goal with two seconds left in the second quarter, to make it a 21–3 halftime lead. The Falcons then increased their lead to 28–3 midway through the third quarter, with quarterback Matt Ryan completing his second touchdown pass. The Patriots then scored 25 unanswered points to tie the game, 28–28, with 57 seconds left in regulation. New England won the overtime coin toss, received the kickoff and drove 75 yards to win with a 2-yard touchdown run by running back James White. When the game ended, more than 30 team and individual Super Bowl records had been either broken or matched. White's 14 receptions and his 20 points scored (off of 3 touchdowns and a two-point conversion) were among these broken records. New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, who also broke single-game Super Bowl records with 43 completed passes, 62 pass attempts, and 466 passing yards, was named Super Bowl MVP for a record fourth time.

Fox's broadcast of the game averaged around 111.3 million viewers, slightly down from the 111.9 million viewers of the previous year's Super Bowl, while the total number of viewers for all or part of the game hit a record number of 172 million. Average TV viewership for the halftime show, headlined by Lady Gaga, was higher at 117.5 million. On the following day a number of media outlets immediately hailed the game as the greatest Super Bowl of all time.

Tevin Coleman

Tevin Ford Coleman (born April 16, 1993) is an American football running back for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Atlanta Falcons in the third round of the 2015 NFL Draft. He played college football at Indiana, where he was a unanimous All-American.

Atlanta Falcons current roster
Active roster
Reserve lists
Free agents

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