Deutsche Welle

Deutsche Welle (German pronunciation: [ˈdɔʏtʃə ˈvɛlə]; "German wave" in German) or DW is Germany's public international broadcaster. The service is available in 30 languages. DW's satellite television service consists of channels in English, German, Spanish, and Arabic. While funded by the German government, the work of DW is regulated by the Deutsche Welle Act,[4] meaning that content is intended to be independent of government influence. DW is a member of the European Broadcasting Union (EBU).

DW offers regularly updated articles on its news website and runs its own center for international media development, DW Akademie. The broadcaster's stated goals are to produce reliable news coverage, provide access to the German language, and promote understanding between peoples.[5]

DW has been broadcasting since 1953. It is headquartered in Bonn, where its radio programmes are produced. Television broadcasts are produced almost entirely in Berlin. Both locations create content for DW's news website.

As of 2018, around 1,500 employees and 1,500 freelancers from 60 countries work for Deutsche Welle in its offices in Bonn and Berlin.[6] According to DW, its output reaches 157 million people worldwide every week. The Director-General of DW is Peter Limbourg.

Logos

OriginalDeutscheWelleLogo

Original logo (1953).

Deutsche Welle logo 1992

Deutsche Welle logo (1992–1995), introduced following the start of Deutsche Welle TV in 1992

Deutsche Welle Dachmarke

Deutsche Welle logo (1995–2012), intended to suggest a radio wave, although it drew comparisons to the Nike Swoosh

Deutsche Welle Logo

DW logo (2012–present)

Broadcast languages

Language Began Ceased Remarks
German 1953[7] TV
English * 1954[7] Radio & TV
French * Radio
Spanish TV
Portuguese Radio
Arabic 1959[8] TV
Persian 1962[9]
Turkish
Russian
Polish *
Czech * 2000[10]
Slovak * 2000[10]
Hungarian * 2000[10]
Serbo-Croatian * 1992[11]
Swahili 1963[9] Radio
Hausa Radio
Indonesian (Malay)
Bulgarian
Romanian *
Slovene 2000
Modern Greek 1964[9] Radio
Hindi
Bengali
Urdu
Italian * 1998[12]
Chinese 1965[13]
Amharic Radio
Sanskrit 1966 1998
Japanese 1969[13] 2000[10]
Macedonian
Pashto 1970[14] Radio
Dari Radio
Serbian 1992[11]
Croatian
Albanian
Bosnian 1997[12]
Danish * 1965 1998[12]
Norwegian *
Swedish *
Dutch * 1967
Ukrainian 2000[10]
Belarusian 2005[15] before 2011

 * partly by Deutschlandfunk (until 1993)

Deutsche Welle
TypeInternational public broadcaster
Country
Germany
HeadquartersBonn, Germany
Broadcast area
National and international
Launch date
3 May 1953
AffiliationWorld Radio Network
Official website
DW.com

History

Beginnings

DW's first shortwave broadcast took place on 3 May 1953 with an address by the then West German President, Theodor Heuss. On 11 June 1953, ARD public broadcasters signed an agreement to share responsibility for Deutsche Welle. At first, it was controlled by Nordwestdeutscher Rundfunk (NWDR). In 1955, NWDR split into Norddeutscher Rundfunk (NDR) and Westdeutscher Rundfunk (WDR), WDR assumed responsibility for Deutsche Welle programming. In 1960, Deutsche Welle became an independent public body after a court ruled that while broadcasting to Germany was a state matter, broadcasting from Germany was part of the federal government's foreign-affairs function. On 7 June 1962 DW joined ARD as a national broadcasting station.[16] Deutsche Welle was originally headquartered in the West German city of Cologne. After reunification, when much of the government relocated to Berlin, the station's headquarters moved to Bonn.

German reunification

With German reunification in 1990, Radio Berlin International (RBI), East Germany's international broadcaster ceased to exist. Some of the RBI staff joined Deutsche Welle and DW inherited some broadcasting facilities, including transmitting facilities at Nauen, as well as RBI's frequencies.

DW (TV) began as RIAS-TV, a television station launched by the West Berlin broadcaster RIAS (Radio in the American Sector / Rundfunk im Amerikanischen Sektor) in August 1988. The fall of the Berlin Wall the following year and German reunification in 1990 meant that RIAS-TV was to be closed down. On 1 April 1992, Deutsche Welle inherited the RIAS-TV broadcast facilities, using them to start a German and English-language television channel broadcast via satellite, DW (TV), adding a short Spanish broadcast segment the following year. In 1995, it began 24-hour operation (12 hours German, 10 hours English, 2 hours Spanish). At that time, DW (TV) introduced a new news studio and a new logo.

Deutsche Welle took over some of the former independent radio broadcasting service Deutschlandfunk's foreign-language programming in 1993, when Deutschlandfunk was absorbed into the new Deutschlandradio.

In addition to radio and television programming, DW sponsored some published material. For example, the South-Asia Department published German Heritage: A Series Written for the South Asia Programme in 1967 and in 1984 published African Writers on the Air. Both publications were transcripts of DW programming.

Internet presence

In September 1994, Deutsche Welle was the first public broadcaster in Germany with an internet presence, initially www-dw.gmd.de, hosted by the GMD Information Technology Research Center. For its first two years, the site listed little more than contact addresses, although DW's News Journal was broadcast in RealAudio from Real's server beginning in 1995, and Süddeutsche Zeitung's initial web presence, which included news articles from the newspaper, shared the site. In 1996, it evolved into a news website using the URL dwelle.de; in 2001, the URL changed to www.dw-world.de, and was changed again in 2012, to www.dw.de. Deutsche Welle purchased the domain dw.com, which previously belonged to DiamondWare, in 2013; DW had attempted to claim ownership of the address in 2000, without success. DW eventually moved to the www.dw.com domain on 22 June 2015.

DW's news site is in seven core languages (Arabic, Chinese, English, German, Spanish, Portuguese for Brazil, and Russian), as well as a mixture of news and information in 23 other languages in which Deutsche Welle broadcasts. Persian became the site's eighth focus language in 2007.

German and European news is DW's central focus, but the site also offers background information about Germany and German language courses.[17] Deutsch, Warum Nicht? (literally: German, Why Not?) is a personal course for learning the German language, created by Deutsche Welle and the Goethe-Institut.[18]

Recent events

In 2001, Deutsche Welle (in conjunction with ARD and ZDF) founded the German TV subscription TV channel for North American viewers. The project was shut down after four years owing to low subscriber numbers. It has since been replaced by the DW-TV channel (also a subscription service).

Unlike most other international broadcasters, DW-TV does not charge terrestrial stations for use of its programming, and as a result, Journal and other programmes are rebroadcast on numerous public broadcasting stations in several countries, including the United States, Australia, and New Zealand. In the Philippines, selected Anglophone programmes are shown nationwide on Net 25.

Deutsche Welle is still suffering from financial and staffing cuts. Its budget was reduced by about €75 million over five years, and of the 2,200 employees it had in 1994, only 1,200 remain. Further cuts are still expected.

In 2003, the German government passed a new "Deutsche Welle Act", which defined DW as a tri-media organization, making the Deutsche Welle website an equal partner with DW-TV and DW Radio. The website is available in 30 languages, but focuses on German, English, Spanish, Russian, Brazilian Portuguese, Chinese, and Arabic. Persian became the eighth focus language in 2007.

In March 2009, DW-TV expanded its television services in Asia with two new channels, namely DW-TV Asia and DW-TV Asia+. DW-TV Asia (DW-TV Asien in German) contains 16 hours of German programming and 8 hours in English, whilst DW-TV Asia+ contains 18 hours of English programmes plus 6 hours of German programmes.[19]

In August 2009, DW-TV's carriage in the United Kingdom on Sky channel 794 ceased, although the channel continues to be available via other European satellites receivable in the UK.[20]

In 2011, DW announced a major reduction of service including the closure of most of its FM services in the Balkans (except for Romani), but that it would expand its network of FM partners in Africa. The radio production for Hausa, Kiswahili, French, and Portuguese for Africa were optimized for FM broadcasts and DW also produces a regional radio magazine daily in English, to be rebroadcast by partners in Africa.

Audio content in Arabic is distributed online, via mobile, or rebroadcast by partners.

DW announced it would focus on FM partnerships for Bengali, Urdu, Dari/Pashtu, and Indonesian for South Asia, India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan.

On 1 November 2011, DW discontinued shortwave broadcasts in German, Russian, Persian, and Indonesian and ended its English service outside Africa. Chinese programming was reduced from 120 minutes to 60 minutes a week. As of November 2011, DW only broadcast radio programming via shortwave in: Amharic, Chinese, Dari, English and French for Africa, Hausa, Kiswahili, Pashtu, Portuguese for Africa and Urdu.[21]

The budget of the Deutsche Welle for 2016 was 301.8 million euros.[22]

On 25 February 2018, DW-TV published "The Climate Cover Up - Big Oil's Campaign of Deception" (2018)[23] after documents confirmed big oil companies have known[24] the burning of fossil fuels impacts climate since 1957.[25]

Rebranding television news

On 22 June 2015, DW TV launched a 24-hour English-language news channel with a new design and a new studio as part of a rebrand to DW News. Previously, DW's news programmes were called Journal and broadcast in English in 3, 15 and 30-minute blocks. The new channel offers 30-minute updates every hour and 60-minute programmes twice a day on weekdays. DW News broadcasts from Berlin but frequently has live social media segments hosted from a specially-designed studio in Bonn. The German, Spanish and Arabic channels also received a new design.

At the same time, DW's news website moved from a .de URL to .com and added a social media stream to its front page. The refreshed DW services were launched under the tagline 'Made for Minds'.

Controversy

On 10 April 2019, DW announced that Venezuela’s state telecoms regulator Conatel had halted its Spanish-language channel. By 15 April 2019, the broadcasting service was restored.[26]

Shortwave relay stations

Transmitter sites in Germany

The Jülich radio transmitter site began operation in 1956 with eleven 100 kW Telefunken transmitters.

The Wertachtal site was authorized in 1972 and began service with four 500 kW transmitters. By 1989 there were 15 transmitters, four of which relayed the Voice of America.

The Nauen transmitter site was inherited from Radio Berlin International. RBI's Russian-made three 500 kW and one 100 kW transmitters were replaced by four Telefunken 500 kW transmitters and four rotatable antennas. Deutsche Welle no longer uses any of transmitters in Germany.

Shortwave relay stations outside Germany

  • Trincomalee, Sri Lanka (1984 to 2013) sold to Sri Lanka Broadcasting Cooperation
    • 3 × 250 kW shortwave transmitters
    • 1 × 400 kW mediumwave transmitter
    • 20 antennas (to be verified)
  • Kigali, Rwanda: A relay station in Kigali, Rwanda, was inaugurated on 30 August 1963, and provided coverage for Africa.[27] This relay station closed 28 March 2015.
    • 4 × 250 kW shortwave transmitters
  • Sines, Portugal closed on 30 October 2011 and was due to be dismantled after a few months.
    • 3 × 250 kW shortwave transmitters

DW used a relay station in Malta had three SW and one 600 kW-MW transmitter and gave partial coverage of the Americas, Southern Asia and the Far East.[28] It was inaugurated on 29 July 1974 in exchange for a grant of almost 1 million GBP. The station closed in January 1996.

Formerly, DW shared a transmitting station on Antigua in the Caribbean with the BBC. It was inaugurated on 1 November 1976 and closed on 31 March 2005. It had a relay-exchange with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation that allowed DW to use two 250 kW transmitters in Sackville, New Brunswick until that facility closed down in 2012.[29]

Relay stations leasing transmitter time to DW

In 2013, DW leased time on the following relay stations:[30]

Directors General

  • 12 October 1960 – 29 February 1968: Hans Otto Wesemann
  • 1 March 1968 – 29 February 1980: Walter Steigner
  • 1 March 1980 – 8 December 1980: Conrad Ahlers
  • 19 December 1980 – 30 June 1981: Heinz Fellhauer (interim)
  • 1 July 1981 – 30 June 1987: Klaus Schütz
  • 1 July 1987 – 30 June 1989: Heinz Fellhauer
  • 1 July 1989 – 31 March 2001: Dieter Weirich
  • 1 April 2001 – 30 September 2001: Reinhard Hartstein (interim as deputy intendant)
  • 1 October 2001 – 30 September 2013: Erik Bettermann
  • 1 October 2013 – present: Peter Limbourg

DW services

  • DW (Radio): shortwave, cable TV, satellite and digital radio (DRM) broadcasting in 29 languages, with a 24-hour service in German and English
  • DW (TV): satellite television broadcasting mainly in German, English, Arabic and Spanish.
  • www.dw.com: 30-language news website
  • Deutsche Welle maintains live video streams on YouTube in German, English, Spanish and Arabic, as well as several channels with recorded videos in various categories and languages.

DW Akademie

DW Akademie is Deutsche Welle's international center for media development, media consulting and journalism training. It offers training and consulting services to partners around the world. It works with broadcasters, media organizations, and universities especially in developing and transitioning countries to promote free and independent media. The work is funded mainly by the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development.[31] Additional sponsors are the German Foreign Office and the European Union.

DW Akademie's journalism traineeship is an 18-month program for young journalists that provides editorial training in the three areas in which Deutsche Welle produces content: radio, television and online. It is aimed at aspiring journalists from Germany as well as from regions to which Deutsche Welle broadcasts.[32]

The "International Media Studies" Master's Program, offered in cooperation with the University of Bonn and the University Bonn-Rhein-Sieg of Applied Sciences, is based at DW Akademie. The four-semester program combines the disciplines of media development, media regulation, and communications. The seminars are held in English and German and the degree is aimed at media representatives from developing and transitioning countries.

Carsten von Nahmen became head of DW Akademie in September 2018. He had been DW's Senior Correspondent in Washington since February 2017 and prior to this, deputy editor-in-chief and head of DW's main news department since 2014. Christian Gramsch was director of DW Akademie from November 2013 until Mai 2018, and prior to this DW's regional director for multimedia. He succeeded DW Akademie director Gerda Meuer, who had previously been deputy editor-in-chief of Deutsche Welle's radio program, and had earlier worked for various media outlets and as a correspondent for Inter News service. Ute Schaeffer has been DW Akademie's deputy head since 2014 and was previously Deutsche Welle's editor-in-chief. [33]

See also

References

  1. ^ "What kind of company is Deutsche Welle? - Questions and answers about DW as a media company - DW - 21.12.2016". www.dw.com.
  2. ^ "Who finances DW? - Questions and answers about DW as a media company - DW - 15.12.2016". DW.COM.
  3. ^ Deutsche Welle Radio - English (8 July 2014). "Deutsche Welle Radio - English - Berlin - Streema Player". Streema.com. Retrieved 14 September 2018.
  4. ^ "Deutsche Welle Act". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  5. ^ "Profile DW". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 5 July 2015.
  6. ^ "Profil DW" (in German). Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 6 November 2017.
  7. ^ a b "1950–1954". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  8. ^ "1955–1959". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  9. ^ a b c "1960–1964". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  10. ^ a b c d e "2000–2005". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  11. ^ a b "1990–1994". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  12. ^ a b c "1995–1999". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  13. ^ a b "1965–1969". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  14. ^ "1970–1974". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  15. ^ "Broadcasting Democracy to Belarus". Belarus Digest. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  16. ^ (in Russian) "Data" (PDF). www.bundestag.de.
  17. ^ "Learn German". www.dw.com. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  18. ^ Deutsch, Warum Nicht?. Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 5 August 2017.
  19. ^ Two New Dedicated Channels Provide Gateway to Europe: Two DW-TV channel launched in Asia Deutsche Welle.
  20. ^ "No more DW-TV on Sky/Astra". Boards. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  21. ^ "Changes in radio broadcasts starting this summer". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  22. ^ "Etataufstockung: Deutsche Welle erhält mehr als zehn Millionen zusätzlich".
  23. ^ (www.dw.com), Deutsche Welle. "The climate cover-up - big oil's deception | All media content | DW | 25.02.2018". DW.COM. Archived from the original on 25 February 2018. Retrieved 26 February 2018.
  24. ^ Supran, Geoffrey; Oreskes, Naomi (2017). "Assessing ExxonMobil's climate change communications (1977–2014)". Environmental Research Letters. 12 (8): 084019. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/aa815f. ISSN 1748-9326.
  25. ^ DW Documentary (25 February 2018), The climate cover up - big oil's campaign of deception | DW Documentary, retrieved 26 February 2018
  26. ^ Vivian Sequera and Andrea Shalal (April 15, 2019), German state-owned TV says it returns to Venezuela screens Reuters.
  27. ^ "Transmitting from the hilltops of Kigali". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  28. ^ Wood 2000: 51.
  29. ^ Wood 2000: 51–52.
  30. ^ Deutsche Welle Short Wave.
  31. ^ "Who we are". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  32. ^ "Traineeship Program". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  33. ^ "About us". Deutsche Welle. Retrieved 19 July 2015.
  • McPhail, Thomas L. Global Communication: Theories, Stakeholders, and Trends. 2006, Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 1-4051-3427-5.
  • Wallis, Roger, and Stanley J. Baran. The Known World of Broadcast News: International News and the Electronic Media. 1990, Routledge. ISBN 0-415-03604-6.
  • Wood, James. History of International Broadcasting. 2000, Institution of Engineering and Technology. ISBN 0-85296-920-1.

External links

Channels TV

Channels Television is a Nigerian independent 24-hour news and media television channel based in Lagos, Nigeria. The parent company, Channels Incorporated, was founded in 1992, a year before the Nigerian government deregulated the broadcast media. It began broadcasting in 1995. Its primary focus is producing news and current affairs programs on Nigerian domestic issues. The Channel's mission is to act as a watchdog on governmental policies and activities.

Operating in Nigeria's popular broadcast media market, Channels Television is the first and only thriving national TV brand, dedicated solely to the dissemination of news. It is the first Nigerian broadcaster to stream its television programming live for 24 hours.

DW-TV

DW-TV (German pronunciation: [ˈdeːveːteːˈfaʊ̯]) is a set of television channels provided by Deutsche Welle. The channels concentrate on news and information and first started broadcasting 1 April 1992. They are broadcast on satellite and produced in Berlin. DW English broadcast service is aimed at the overseas market, similar to DD India, WION, BBC World News, France 24 and RT.

Der Plan

Der Plan is a German electronic music group from Düsseldorf, formed in the earlier months of 1979 by Moritz Reichelt (A.K.A. "Moritz R"), Kai Horn, and Frank Fenstermacher, originally under the name of Weltaufstandsplan ("World Rebellion Plan").

This group is considered the pioneer of Neue Deutsche Welle.

Deutsch-Österreichisches Feingefühl

DÖF (Deutsch-Österreichisches Feingefühl), (German-Austrian sensitivity), was a 1980s Austrian-German Neue Deutsche Welle pop band, best known for their 1983 single "Codo".

Fehlfarben

Fehlfarben is a Neue Deutsche Welle band from Düsseldorf, Germany. The band name is from a German term referring to

cigars with a discoloured wrapper leaf and sold cheaply: singer Peter Hein was in this line of work at Xerox while in the band. Its founding members were Peter Hein (vocals), former Mittagspause ("lunch break"), Thomas Schwebel (guitar, former Mittagspause, S.Y.P.H.), Michael Kemner (bass, former 20 Colors, Mau Mau, DAF, YOU), Frank Fenstermacher (saxophone, later Der Plan), Markus Oehlen and Uwe Bauer (drums, former Mittagspause, Materialschlacht).

Ideal (German band)

Ideal was one of the more successful German Neue Deutsche Welle music groups. It is best known for the songs "Blaue Augen" (Blue Eyes), "Berlin", and "Monotonie" (Monotony).

Joachim Witt

Joachim Witt (born 22 February 1949 in Hamburg, Germany) is a German musician and actor.

Journal (German TV programme)

The Journal was a news programme on Deutsche Welle broadcast from its studios in Berlin, Germany. It was broadcast every day, usually on the hour, and was available in English, German, Spanish and Arabic. These were broadcast via satellites to different parts of the world, but all these channels could be viewed via the media centre on DW's website and are often relayed via local broadcasters/channels.

The Journal was first broadcast on 1 April 1992 when RIAS-TV became DW. Major rebrands of the Journal took place in 1994, 1999, 2002 and 2006.

The Journal ended on 22 June 2015 after DW-TV reorganized and the programme succeeded by DW News (German: DW Nachrichten, Spanish: DW Noticias).

Malaria!

Malaria! was an experimental electronic band from West Berlin formed in 1981 by Gudrun Gut and Bettina Köster following the dissolution of Mania D with Karin Luner, Eva Gossling later Die Krupps and Beate Bartel (of Liaisons Dangereuses). Other members included Manon P. Duursma, Christine Hahn, and Susanne Kuhnke (also a member of Die Haut). They are most often associated with Neue Deutsche Welle and post-punk.

Malaria!'s most popular record was New York Passage, which was top 10 in both U.S. and European independent charts and led to a tour with The Birthday Party, John Cale, and Nina Hagen.

There are videos for the songs "Geld/Money", "Your Turn to Run", and "You, You" (directed by Anne Carlisle) along with a live video for "Thrash Me" featured in a German documentary called Super 80.

In 2001, an EP of Malaria! covers entitled Versus was released and included a popular cover of "Kaltes Klares Wasser" by Chicks on Speed.

Nena (band)

Nena (German: [ˈneːna]) was a German Neue Deutsche Welle band. In 1983 and 1984, their German-language song "99 Luftballons" (and its English version, "99 Red Balloons") reached number one in the singles charts of countries around the world.

Neue Deutsche Härte

Neue Deutsche Härte (German for "New German Hardness", abbrev: NDH) is a subgenre of rock music that developed in Germany during the mid-1990s. Alluding to the style of Neue Deutsche Welle, the term was coined by the music press after the 1995 release of Rammstein's album Herzeleid.

Neue Deutsche Welle

Neue Deutsche Welle (NDW, pronounced [ˈnɔʏə ˈdɔʏtʃə ˈvɛlə], "New German Wave") is a genre of West German rock music originally derived from post-punk and new wave music with electronic influences. The term "Neue Deutsche Welle" was first coined by a Dutch radio DJ Frits Spits on popular nationwide radiostation Hilversum 3, which was very popular among German listeners. Soon after that it got used in a record shop advertisement by Burkhardt Seiler in the West German magazine Sounds in August 1979, and then coined by journalist Alfred Hilsberg whose article about the movement titled "Neue Deutsche Welle — Aus grauer Städte Mauern" ("New German Wave — From Grey Cities' Walls") was published in Sounds in October 1979.

Neue Deutsche Welle (album)

Neue Deutsche Welle (German for New German Wave; see Neue Deutsche Welle) is the 1st solo album by German rapper Fler.

The album is accused of having nationalist views, because of his lyrics in songs like "Neue Deutsche Welle", such as the line: Das ist schwarz, rot, gold - hart und stolz ("This is black, red, gold - hard and proud"). The black, red, and gold refers to the colors of the German flag.

Palais Schaumburg (band)

Palais Schaumburg was a new wave band from Hamburg. The style was classified as Neue Deutsche Welle, and strongly characterized by their avant garde music and dadaistic attitude.

The band was originally formed in 1980, featuring Timo Blunck, Holger Hiller, Thomas Fehlmann, and percussionist F.M. Einheit. The group's name stands for Das Palais Schaumburg in Bonn, the Cold War era residence of the German chancellor.

Einheit left the group, eventually to join Einstürzende Neubauten and was replaced by Ralf Hertwig prior to Palais Schaumburg's first full-length album Palais Schaumburg which was produced by David Cunningham and released in 1981. Shortly after it was released, Hiller left the band and started his solo career. He was replaced with Moritz von Oswald and vocalist Walther Thielsch.

The group made several singles and albums throughout early 1980s, when their avant garde sounds were heavily influenced by funk, especially in albums Lupa and Parlez-Vous Schaumburg.

They eventually split up in 1984. All the members have been working on their solo careers.On Thursday 21 November 2013 Palais Schaumburg appeared at the Saint Ghetto Festival in Bern, Switzerland.

Peace Prize of the German Book Trade

The Peace Prize of the German Book Trade (German: Friedenspreis des Deutschen Buchhandels) is an international peace prize given yearly at the Frankfurt Book Fair in the Paulskirche in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It has been awarded by the Börsenverein des Deutschen Buchhandels since 1950 and the winner is remunerated with €25,000.According to its statute, “(t)he foundation is committed to peace, humanity and understanding among all peoples and nations of the world. The Peace Prize promotes international tolerance by acknowledging individuals who have contributed to these ideals through their exceptional activities, especially in the fields of literature, science and art. Prize winners are chosen without any reference to their national, racial or religious background."Traditionally, the President of Germany and leading political, cultural and diplomatic persons attend the ceremony and ZDF TV covers the event.

Qantara.de

Qantara.de (Classical Arabic: قنطرة qanṭarah, meaning "bridge") is an Internet portal in German, English, and Arabic, designed to promote intercultural dialogue between the Western and Islamic worlds.

The portal was founded on the initiative of the German Foreign Office, in reaction to the crisis ridden developments in relations to Islamic cultures in the wake of the shock of the September 11 attacks in the USA. Online since March 2003, the platform is jointly run by the German Federal Agency for Civic Education (bpb), Germany’s international broadcaster Deutsche Welle (DW), the Goethe-Institut (GI) and the German Institute for Foreign Cultural Relations (ifa), and is funded by the foreign office. The task of the joint dialogue project is to promote understanding between the various cultures, with the aim of combating ignorance and prejudice through knowledge.

The editorial team works to publish writing by Western and Islamic authors who seek open and respectful discussion of both commonalities and controversial subjects. These have included diverse contributors, like the Egyptian literary scholar Nasr Hamid Abu Zaid, the German former diplomat and Muslim Murad Hofmann, the Islam theologian Halima Krausen, the conflict researcher Heiner Bielefeldt and the physicist Ernst Ulrich von Weizsäcker.

Rock music in Germany

German rock music (Deutschrock) came into its own only by the late 1960s, but spawned many bands spanning genres such as krautrock, Neue Deutsche Welle, heavy metal, punk, and industrial.

Rock and roll itself arose in the United States in the 1940s, and spread across the world beginning in about 1956. There were few German performers at that time, even though American rock was popular in (West) Germany. Rockabilly stars like Bill Haley & His Comets were of particular popularity. The reasons for this lack of German musical innovation were the suppression of "degenerate" forms of music by the Nazis and/or the traumatic effects of the war—while Germany was a center of several forms of modern music before the Nazi era, it had difficulty developing its own music culture after its occupation.

The BOBs (weblog award)

The BOBs (Best of the Blogs) is the world’s largest international weblog competition, founded in 2004 and sponsored by Deutsche Welle, the German International Broadcasting Service.

Through the BOBs, Deutsche Welle focuses attention on the promotion of freedom of information and the press around the world. In cooperation with Reporters Without Borders, Deutsche Welle has presented a special award to bloggers promoting these specific ideals since 2005.

Weblogs, podcasts and videoblogs from all over the world can be submitted for the BOBs in one of the following 14 languages: Arabic, Chinese, German, English, French, Indonesian, Persian, Bengali, Portuguese, Russian, Turkish, Ukrainian, Hindi and Spanish.

Trio (band)

Trio was a German band, formed in the small German town of Großenkneten in 1979. The band is most noted for the song "Da Da Da" which was a hit in 30 countries worldwide.

Broadcasters
Television channels
Deutschlandradio
Discontinued
Current members
Former members
Programmes
Channels
ARD
ZDF
ARD & ZDF
Mediengruppe RTL
Deutschland
ProSiebenSat.1
Media
Viacom
Discovery
Networks
Disney–ABC
Others
Members of the World Radio Network
English-language
English-language broadcast television networks in the United States
Major
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Specialty
Defunct

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