Desperados Under the Eaves

"Desperados Under the Eaves" is a song written and performed by Warren Zevon from his eponymous 1976 album.[1]

The song describes the narrator's growing alcoholism. "Cooped up in his shitty motel room with The Shakes, a drink-desperate Zevon wittily narrates his frustration with L.A.'s refusal to give anyone a free pass. Even if it sinks into the ocean (oh, and it will), the city will still get its due. You may hate it here, but you can’t escape ('Heaven help the one who leaves') so long as you’re empty-handed."[2]

This song features background vocals from Carl Wilson of The Beach Boys. When conducting the string section for this song, Zevon kept the veteran players "on his side" with pre-written humor.[3] Zevon has said in interviews that this is one of his most personal songs.

The LA Weekly listed the song as number 10 in its list of "The 20 Best Songs Ever Written About L.A."[2]

"Desperados Under the Eaves"
Single by Warren Zevon
from the album Warren Zevon
Released1976
GenreRock
Length4:47
LabelAsylum
Songwriter(s)Warren Zevon

References

  1. ^ Desperados Under the Eaves at AllMusic
  2. ^ a b "The 20 Best Songs Ever Written About L.A.", LA Weekly, 15 October 2014
  3. ^ I'll Sleep When I'm Dead: The Dirty Life and Times of Warren Zevon by Crystal Zevon, (2008) pp109-111
Billy Hinsche

William "Billy" Hinsche (born June 29, 1951) is an American musician who was part of the singing group Dino, Desi & Billy and a touring musician with The Beach Boys.

Carl Wilson

Carl Dean Wilson (December 21, 1946 – February 6, 1998) was an American musician, singer, and songwriter who co-founded the Beach Boys. He is best remembered as their lead guitarist, as the youngest brother of bandmates Brian and Dennis Wilson, and as the group's de facto leader in the early 1970s. He was also the band's musical director on stage from 1965 until his death.

Influenced by the guitar playing of Chuck Berry and the Ventures, Wilson's initial role in the group was that of lead guitarist and backing vocals, but he performed lead vocals on several of their later hits, including "God Only Knows" (1966), "Good Vibrations" (1966), and "Kokomo" (1988). Unlike other members of the band, he often played alongside the studio musicians employed during the group's critical and commercial peak in the mid 1960s. After Brian's reduced involvement with the group, Carl produced the bulk of their albums between Wild Honey (1967) and Holland (1973), where the production was nominally credited to "the Beach Boys". Concurrently, he spent several years challenging his draft status as a conscientious objector.

During the 1980s, Wilson attempted to launch a solo career, releasing the albums Carl Wilson (1981) and Young Blood (1983). In the 1990s, he recorded material with Gerry Beckley and Robert Lamm, later released for the posthumous album Like a Brother (2000). He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a member of the Beach Boys in 1988. Wilson was also a member of the Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness, a religious corporation. He died, aged 51, of lung cancer in 1998.

Gower Street (Los Angeles)

Gower Street is a street in Los Angeles, California that has played an important role in the ongoing evolution of Hollywood, particularly as the home to several prominent Poverty Row studios during the area's Golden Age. It marks the eastern terminus of the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

I'll Sleep When I'm Dead (An Anthology)

I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead (An Anthology) is a two-disc compilation album by American singer-songwriter Warren Zevon, released on Rhino Records in 1996. It spans his career from his eponymous debut album on Asylum Records to date of release, ignoring his disowned initial album from 1969, Wanted Dead or Alive. It contains tracks from all ten of his albums released during this period, and includes contributions to soundtracks and his one-off album with members of R.E.M., Hindu Love Gods.

Disc one collects recordings done for Asylum, and disc two collects recordings done for Virgin and Giant Records.

Jordan Zevon

Jordan Zevon (born August 7, 1969) is an American singer, musician and songwriter. He is the son of rock musician Warren Zevon.

Following his father's death in 2003, Jordan, his half-sister, Ariel, and longtime Zevon collaborator Jorge Calderón accepted Warren's two posthumous Grammy Awards for Best Rock Vocal Performance and Best Contemporary Folk Album for The Wind. His father's death from mesothelioma moved Jordan to work for the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization as an advocate for those harmed by exposure to asbestos. He appeared on the 2004 tribute album to his father titled Enjoy Every Sandwich: Songs of Warren Zevon singing the previously unreleased song "Studebaker". In 2005, he appeared on another tribute album called Hurry Home Early: the Songs of Warren Zevon, issued by Wampus Multimedia, where he sang another unreleased song called "Warm Rain" with Simone Stevens.

In 2005, Zevon released his self-titled debut EP through his production company Mixed Headache. His first full-length album, Insides Out, was released through Texas-based New West Records on April 15, 2008.

On June 7, 2007, Zevon appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman and again on April 18, 2008. In 2008, he won the Overall Grand Prize of the prestigious 14th Annual USA Songwriting Competition with his song "Home".

Zevon is currently working on a new album entitled Imperfect, which he has described to be "darker and more rock than power pop" compared to his previous work. He has stated that it will feature the tracks "May or May Not", "Not Like Me", "Merry Go Wrong", "Wrecking Ball", "The Epic Fail" and "Stick With Me". On August 4, 2011, he released a demo take of the song "Wrecking Ball" on his personal website.

Zevon has also produced several films, including the motion picture $pent (2000).

List of songs about California

This is a list of songs about California. Many songs have been written about California; some songs describe its people, places, and events, while others touch on Californian experiences and state of mind. This list tries to compile those songs and the artists who wrote them, although many entries include songs covered by artists who did not write the song.

List of songs about Los Angeles

This is a list of songs about Los Angeles, California: either refer to, are set there, named after a location or feature of the city, named after a famous resident, or inspired by an event that occurred locally. In addition, several adjacent communities in the Greater Los Angeles Area such as West Hollywood, Beverly Hills, Santa Monica, Pasadena, Inglewood, and Compton are also included in this list despite being separate municipalities. The songs listed are those that are notable or are by notable artists.

Warren Zevon

Warren William Zevon (; January 24, 1947 – September 7, 2003) was an American rock singer-songwriter and musician.

Zevon's most famous compositions include "Werewolves of London", "Lawyers, Guns and Money", "Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner" and "Johnny Strikes Up the Band", all of which are featured on his third album, Excitable Boy (1978), whose title track is also well-known. He also wrote major hits that were recorded by other artists, including "Poor Poor Pitiful Me", "Accidentally Like a Martyr", "Mohammed's Radio", "Carmelita", and "Hasten Down the Wind". Along with his own work, he recorded or performed occasional covers, including Allen Toussaint's "A Certain Girl", Bob Dylan's "Knockin' on Heaven's Door", Leonard Cohen's "First We Take Manhattan" and Prince's "Raspberry Beret".

Initially successful as a band leader, Zevon struggled to have a solo career until his music was performed by Linda Rondstadt. This launched a cult following that lasted for 25 years with Zevon making occasional returns to album and single charts until his death from cancer in 2003. He briefly found a new audience in the 1980s by teaming up with members of R.E.M. in the blues rock outfit Hindu Love Gods.

Known for his dry wit and acerbic lyrics, he was a guest several times on Late Night with David Letterman and the Late Show with David Letterman.

Warren Zevon (album)

Warren Zevon is the second studio album by American musician Warren Zevon. This album was recorded in 1975 and released on May 10, 1976, by Asylum Records. A remastered version of the album with special bonus tracks was released in 2008 by Rhino Records.

Werewolves of London

"Werewolves of London" is a rock song performed by American singer-songwriter Warren Zevon. It was composed by Zevon, LeRoy Marinell and Waddy Wachtel and was included on Excitable Boy (1978), Zevon's third solo album. The track featured Fleetwood Mac's Mick Fleetwood and John McVie on drums and bass respectively. The single was released by Asylum Records and was a top 40 US hit, the only one of Zevon's career, reaching No. 21 on the Billboard Hot 100 that May.

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