Derrick Henry

Derrick Lamar Henry Jr.[1][2] (born January 4, 1994) is an American football running back for the Tennessee Titans of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the Alabama Crimson Tide, and was drafted in the second round of the 2016 NFL draft by the Titans. In December 2015, he broke Herschel Walker's single-season college rushing yards record in the SEC. He won the 2015 Heisman Trophy, as well as the Doak Walker Award, the Maxwell Award, and the Walter Camp Award. Henry holds the national high school football record for career rushing yards.

Derrick Henry
refer to caption
Henry with the Tennessee Titans in 2018
No. 22 – Tennessee Titans
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:January 4, 1994 (age 25)
Yulee, Florida
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:247 lb (112 kg)
Career information
High school:Yulee (FL)
College:Alabama
NFL Draft:2016 / Round: 2 / Pick: 45
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 2018
Rushing yards:2,293
Rushing average:4.6
Rushing touchdowns:22
Receptions:38
Receiving yards:372
Receiving touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com

Early years

Derrick Henry All-American Bowl
Henry (No. 2) at the U.S. Army All-American Bowl in 2013

Henry attended Yulee High School in Yulee, Florida, where he was a three-sport star in football, basketball, and track. He played as a running back for the Yulee Hornets football team.[3] He ran for 2,465 yards and 26 touchdowns as a freshman in 2009. He was named a first-team All-Coast at running back in 2010 after rushing for 2,788 yards and 38 touchdowns while averaging 8.9 yards per attempt. He rushed for 2,610 yards and 34 scores as a junior in 2011 to earn first-team All-Coast honors from the Florida Times-Union. He set the Florida high school record with a 510-yard performance against Jacksonville Jackson and averaged 9.2 yards per carry and 327.8 yards per game as a senior, finishing the season with a state-record 4,261 yards and 55 touchdowns.[4] He finished his high school football career with 12,124 career rushing yards, which broke Ken Hall's career record.[5][6] He also rushed for 153 career touchdowns. He played for the East squad in the 2013 U.S. Army All-American Bowl, where he rushed for 53 yards with a touchdown and a two-point conversion.[7][8]

As a track & field athlete, Henry competed as a sprinter at Yulee from 2010 to 2011. He posted a personal-best time of 11.11 seconds in the 100-meter dash at the 2011 FHSAA 2A District 3 Championships, where he placed seventh.[9] He was also a member of the 4×100 and 4×400 squads.[10]

Considered a five-star recruit by ESPN.com, Henry was listed as the No. 1 athlete (player with no designated position) in the nation in 2013.[11] After originally committing to the University of Georgia, Henry committed to the University of Alabama on September 28, 2012.[12]

High school statistics

Derrick Henry Rushing
Year Team GP Att Yds Avg Yds/G Lng TD
2009 Yulee 11 313 2,465 7.9 224.1 26
2010 Yulee 12 313 2,788 8.9 232.3 75 38
2011 Yulee 12 309 2,610 8.4 217.5 90 34
2012 Yulee 13 462 4,261 9.2 327.8 80 55
Career 48 1,397 12,124 8.7 252.6 90 153

College career

Henry attended and played college football for the University of Alabama from 2013 to 2015.[13] He majored in Communications. He graduated on May 4, 2018.[14] That same day, he published an article in The Players' Tribune thanking his late grandmother for the inspiration to continue pursuing his degree.[14][15]

2013 season

As a true freshman in 2013, Henry rushed for 382 yards on 36 carries with three touchdowns.[16] On October 19, against Arkansas, he had 111 rushing yards and his first collegiate rushing touchdown in the 52–0 victory.[17] On November 23, against Chattanooga, he had six carries for 66 yards and his second rushing touchdown of the season.[18] During the 2014 Sugar Bowl, he rushed for 100 yards and a touchdown on eight carries and had a 61-yard touchdown reception in the 45–31 loss to the Oklahoma Sooners.[19][20] In that game, Spanish-language broadcaster Pablo Viruega nicknamed him "El Tractorcito" (The Little Tractor) due to his long stride and powerful gait on ESPN Deportes. The nickname became a popular internet meme.[21]

2014 season

In the 2014 season, Henry shared time in the backfield with T. J. Yeldon. In the season opener against West Virginia, he had 113 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[22] On September 20, against Florida, he had 111 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[23] On October 18 against Texas A&M, he had 70 rushing yards, one rushing touchdown, and a 41-yard receiving touchdown.[24] In the following game against Tennessee at Neyland Stadium, he had 78 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown.[25] On November 22, against Western Carolina, he had 92 rushing yards, two rushing touchdowns, and a nine-yard receiving touchdown.[26] In the annual rivalry game against Auburn, he had 72 rushing yards and a touchdown in the high-scoring 55–44 installment of the rivalry.[27] In the SEC Championship against Missouri, he had 141 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns in the victory.[28] Alabama qualified for the College Football Playoff and faced off against Ohio State in the National Semifinals in the Sugar Bowl.[29] Henry had 95 rushing yards, one rushing touchdown, and two receptions for 54 yards as Alabama fell 42–35 to the Buckeyes.[30] In his sophomore year, Henry rushed for 990 yards on 172 carries with 11 touchdowns.[31]

2015 season

After Yeldon left for the NFL, Henry took over as the starting running back as a junior in 2015. In the season opener against Wisconsin, he had 147 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns.[32] In the next game, against Middle Tennessee State, he had 96 rushing yards and another game with three rushing touchdowns.[33] In the next game against Ole Miss, he had 127 rushing yards, one rushing touchdown, and five receptions for 39 yards in Alabama's only loss of the season.[34] After rushing for 52 yards against Louisiana–Monroe, he had 148 rushing yards and a touchdown in a victory over Georgia.[35][36] On October 10, he rushed for 95 yards and a touchdown against Arkansas.[37] After the victory over the Razorbacks, he went on an impressive stretch of performances. On October 17, against Texas A&M, he had 236 rushing yards, two rushing touchdowns, and an 18-yard reception.[38] In the next game, a narrow 19–14 victory over Tennessee, he had 143 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[39] In the following game, a much-anticipated matchup with fellow Heisman contender Leonard Fournette, he had 210 rushing yards and three rushing touchdowns against LSU.[40] In the next game against Mississippi State, he had 204 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[41] In the next game, against Charleston Southern, he had 68 rushing yards and two more rushing touchdowns in a limited role in the 56–6 victory.[42] In the Iron Bowl against Auburn, he had 271 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown on 46 carries.[43] In the SEC Championship against Florida, he had 44 carries for 189 yards and a touchdown.[44] Alabama qualified for the College Football Playoff and faced off against Michigan State in the National Semifinals.[45] In the 38–0 victory over the Spartans in the Cotton Bowl, he had 75 rushing yards and two rushing touchdowns.[46] During Alabama's 45–40 victory over Clemson in the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship, he rushed for 158 yards on 36 carries with three touchdowns.[47] During the game, he also broke Shaun Alexander's record for most career rushing yards in Alabama history.[48] Playing in all 15 games, he rushed for SEC records 2,219 yards and 28 touchdowns on 395 carries. In addition, he scored at least one touchdown in each game.[49][50][51] Henry won the Heisman Trophy, beating out finalists Christian McCaffrey and Deshaun Watson.[52] He won numerous other awards including the Doak Walker Award, Walter Camp Award, and Maxwell Award.[53] He declared for the 2016 NFL Draft after his junior season.[14]

College statistics

Derrick Henry Rushing Receiving
Year Team Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD
2013 Alabama 35 382 10.6 80T 3 1 61 61.0 61T 1
2014 Alabama 172 990 5.8 49 11 5 133 26.6 49 2
2015 Alabama 395 2,219 5.6 74T 28 11 91 8.3 28 0
Career 602 3,591 6.0 80T 42 17 285 16.8 61T 3

Professional career

Coming out of Alabama, Henry was projected by the majority of analysts to be either drafted in the late first or second round. He was the overall consensus second best running back available behind Ohio State's Ezekiel Elliott. Scouts regarded his main assets to be his large frame, violent running, ability to break tackles with ease, speed, long strides, superior conditioning, and consistent play. The main concerns were about the wear and tear his body took as a workhorse at Alabama, his slow acceleration, average foot quickness, below-average catching ability with his hands, narrow based running style, sluggish cutbacks, and his problem with running tall, although he was an extremely good power back.[54]

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad BP
6 ft 2 58 in
(1.90 m)
247 lb
(112 kg)
33 in
(0.84 m)
8 34 in
(0.22 m)
4.54 s 1.60 s 2.67 s 4.38 s 7.20 s 37 in
(0.94 m)
10 ft 10 in
(3.30 m)
22 reps
All values from NFL Combine[55][56]

Henry was drafted by the Tennessee Titans in the second round (45th overall) of the 2016 NFL Draft.[57] He was the second running back taken that year.[58] He was reunited with his former fullback at Alabama Jalston Fowler.[59]

2016 season: Rookie year

On May 9, 2016, the Tennessee Titans signed Henry to a four-year, $5.40 million contract with $3.30 million guaranteed and a signing bonus of $2.13 million.[60]

RB Derrick Henry Titans, 2016
Henry in 2016

Henry began his rookie season as the backup running back to veteran DeMarco Murray. He wore the No. 2 jersey throughout training camp and preseason and donned the No. 22 once running back Dexter McCluster was cut on September 2, 2016.[61] Henry made his professional regular season debut and earned his first career start in the Titans' season-opening loss to the Minnesota Vikings. He finished the game with five carries for 3 yards and two receptions for 41 yards.[62]

On October 27, 2016, Henry scored his first NFL touchdown on a 6-yard rush in a 36–22 victory over the Jacksonville Jaguars. He finished the game with 16 carries for a then career-high 60 rushing yards and a rushing touchdown and 4 catches for 37 yards.[63] On December 18, 2016, he had 9 rushing attempts for 58 rushing yards and a season-high 2 rushing touchdowns in a 19–17 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs.[64] During a Week 17 matchup against the Houston Texans, he ran for a then-career-high 65 rushing yards on 15 carries and scored a touchdown in the 24–17 victory.[65]

Henry finished his rookie season with 110 carries for 490 yards (both 6th among NFL rookies in 2016[66]) and 5 touchdowns in 15 games and two starts. He also caught 13 passes for 137 yards.[67][68]

2017 season

Henry split carries with DeMarco Murray and run-oriented quarterback Marcus Mariota. On September 17, 2017, Henry ran for 92 yards and a touchdown on 14 carries in a 37–16 victory against the Jacksonville Jaguars.[69] On October 16, 2017, on Monday Night Football, Henry ran for 131 yards on 19 carries, including a 72-yard touchdown late in the fourth quarter of the 36–22 victory over the Indianapolis Colts. In addition, he had a reception for 14 receiving yards in the victory. The rushing total was the most yardage he had gained in his career.[70] On December 3, 2017, Henry ran for 109 yards on 11 carries and beat his longest rush of the year with a 75-yard rushing touchdown late in the fourth quarter of the 24–13 victory over the Houston Texans.[71] On December 31, 2017, Henry caught his first receiving touchdown on a 66-yard reception from Marcus Mariota.[72]

The Titans finished second in the AFC South with a 9–7 record and made the playoffs as a Wild Card team.[73][74] In the Wild Card Round, the Titans played the Kansas City Chiefs. Because DeMarco Murray was out with a knee injury, Henry got the start.[75] The Titans won 22–21. In the win, Henry had the best performance of his career up to that point, rushing for 156 yards and a touchdown on 23 carries. He also caught 2 passes for 35 yards.[76][77] In the Divisional Round against the New England Patriots, Henry had 28 rushing yards and 21 receiving yards in the 35–14 loss.[78]

Henry finished the regular season with 176 carries for 744 rushing yards and five touchdowns in 15 games and two starts. He also caught 11 passes for 136 receiving yards and a touchdown. In the postseason, Henry ran for 184 yards and a touchdown on 35 carries and caught 5 passes for 56 yards.[79]

2018 season

Henry split carries with Dion Lewis and run-oriented quarterback Marcus Mariota for most of the 2018 season. During Week 2, Henry recorded an eight-yard pass completion, the first of his career, to wide receiver Taywan Taylor in the Titans' 20–17 victory over the Houston Texans.[80] He also had 18 carries in that game and the next against the Jacksonville Jaguars, but was used much less frequently through the middle of the season, from Week 4 to Week 13, Henry averaged nine carries for only 37 yards per game, and never rushed for over 60 yards.[67] This all changed in Week 14 against the Jaguars. In the second quarter, Henry had a 99-yard touchdown run, fending off three tacklers, tying him with Tony Dorsett for the longest NFL touchdown run. He finished the game with four rushing touchdowns and 238 rushing yards, breaking Chris Johnson's franchise record of 228 yards in 2009.[81][82] He also became the ninth player in NFL history to record a 200+ yard and 4+ touchdown game, and the first to do so on fewer than 22 carries.[83] His 238 rushing yards were the most by any player for a single game for the 2018 season.[84] Henry was named the AFC Offensive Player of the Week due to his spectacular performance.[85] During Week 15, the Titans went on the road to face the New York Giants. In a cold and rainy game, Henry led the NFL in rushing for the second consecutive week with 170 yards on a career-high 33 carries, along with a one-yard reception and six-yard pass completion in the 17–0 shutout.[86] In Weeks 16 and 17, he combined for 177 rushing yards and a touchdown in the two games against the Washington Redskins and Indianapolis Colts.[87][88] He was later named the AFC Offensive Player of the Month for December.[89] Henry finished the 2018 season setting career-highs in rushing yards with 1,059, rushing touchdowns with 12, and receptions with 15.[90]

NFL statistics

Legend
Led the league
NFL Record
Bold Career high

Regular season

Year Team Games Rushing Receiving Fumbles
GP GS Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Avg Lng TD FUM Lost
2016 TEN 15 2 110 490 4.5 22 5 13 137 10.5 29 0 0 0
2017 TEN 16 2 176 744 4.2 75T 5 11 136 12.4 66T 1 1 0
2018 TEN 16 12 215 1,059 4.9 99T 12 15 99 6.6 21 0 1 1
Career 47 16 501 2,293 4.6 99T 22 39 372 9.5 66T 1 2 1

Postseason

Year Team Games Rushing Receiving Fumbles
GP GS Att Yds Avg Lng TD Rec Yds Lng TD Fum Lost
2017 TEN 2 2 35 184 5.3 35T 1 5 56 29 0 1 0
Career 2 2 35 184 5.3 35T 1 5 56 29 0 1 0

[77]

NFL records

  • First player to record a 200+ yard and 4+ touchdown game on fewer than 22 carries

Titans franchise records

  • Most rushing yards in a game: 238[91]
  • Most rushing yards in back-to-back games: 408[92]
  • Most scrimmage yards in a postseason game: 191[93]
  • Longest rushing play: 99 yards (Henry became the second player in NFL history to record a 99-yard rushing touchdown, joining Hall of Famer Tony Dorsett who achieved this in 1982)[94]

References

  1. ^ "Derrick Henry Pro-Football-Reference Profile". rbref.com.
  2. ^ "Derrick Henry Bio". TitansOnline.com. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  3. ^ Tyson, Derek. "Bama commit Henry breaks H.S. rushing record". ESPN.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  4. ^ "Derrick Henry Bio – ROLLTIDE.COM – University of Alabama Official Athletic Site". Rolltide.Com. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  5. ^ "Derrick Henry of Yulee (Fla.) High School breaks career high school rushing record". Espn.go.com. November 17, 2012. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  6. ^ "Derrick Henry Breaks High School Rushing Record: Yulee Running Back Tops Ken Hall's Yards Mark". Huffingtonpost.com. November 16, 2012. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  7. ^ "Derrick Henry scores TD in U.S. Army All-American Bowl". jacksonville.com. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  8. ^ "Derrick Henry's ridiculous high school career". sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  9. ^ "Derrick Henry – FL Track and Field Profile". Athletic.net. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  10. ^ "Derrick Henry | Alabama RB". Trackingfootball.com. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  11. ^ "Derrick Henry – Football Recruiting – Player Profiles – ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  12. ^ "Record-setting RB Derrick Henry commits to Alabama Crimson Tide". Espn.go.com. September 29, 2012. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  13. ^ "Derrick Henry College Stats". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  14. ^ a b c Hall, Jason (May 4, 2018). "Derrick Henry explains why graduating from Alabama was so important to him". seccountry.com. Retrieved May 5, 2018.
  15. ^ Henry, Derrick (May 4, 2018). "I Did It, Grandma". The Players' Tribune. Retrieved May 5, 2018.
  16. ^ "Derrick Henry 2013 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  17. ^ "Arkansas at Alabama Box Score, October 19, 2013". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  18. ^ "Chattanooga at Alabama Box Score, November 23, 2013". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  19. ^ "Sugar Bowl – Oklahoma vs Alabama Box Score, January 2, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  20. ^ Bromberg, Nick (January 3, 2014). "Alabama's Derrick Henry breaks out for 100 yards and two touchdowns in Sugar Bowl loss | Dr. Saturday – Yahoo Sports". Sports.yahoo.com. Retrieved September 29, 2015.
  21. ^ Casagrande, Michael. "The story behind Derrick Henry's 'Tractorcito' nickname and the announcer who coined it". al.com. Retrieved June 19, 2018.
  22. ^ "West Virginia vs Alabama Box Score, August 30, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  23. ^ "Florida at Alabama Box Score, September 20, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  24. ^ "Texas A&M at Alabama Box Score, October 18, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  25. ^ "Alabama at Tennessee Box Score, October 25, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  26. ^ "Western Carolina at Alabama Box Score, November 22, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  27. ^ "Auburn at Alabama Box Score, November 29, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  28. ^ "Alabama vs Missouri Box Score, December 6, 2014". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  29. ^ "2014 Alabama Crimson Tide Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  30. ^ "Sugar Bowl – Ohio State vs Alabama Box Score, January 1, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  31. ^ "Derrick Henry 2014 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  32. ^ "Wisconsin vs Alabama Box Score, September 5, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  33. ^ "Middle Tennessee State at Alabama Box Score, September 12, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  34. ^ "Ole Miss at Alabama Box Score, September 19, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  35. ^ "Louisiana-Monroe at Alabama Box Score, September 26, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  36. ^ "Alabama at Georgia Box Score, October 3, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  37. ^ "Arkansas at Alabama Box Score, October 10, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  38. ^ "Alabama at Texas A&M Box Score, October 17, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  39. ^ "Tennessee at Alabama Box Score, October 24, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  40. ^ "LSU at Alabama Box Score, November 7, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  41. ^ "Alabama at Mississippi State Box Score, November 14, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  42. ^ "Charleston Southern at Alabama Box Score, November 21, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  43. ^ "Alabama at Auburn Box Score, November 28, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  44. ^ "Florida vs Alabama Box Score, December 5, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  45. ^ "2015 Alabama Crimson Tide Schedule and Results". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  46. ^ "Cotton Bowl – Michigan State vs Alabama Box Score, December 31, 2015". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  47. ^ "College Football Championship – Alabama vs Clemson Box Score, January 11, 2016". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  48. ^ "Henry sets school rushing mark as Tide win title". ESPN.com. January 12, 2016. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  49. ^ "Derrick Henry 2015 Game Log". College Football at Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  50. ^ "Derrick Henry breaks Herschel Walker's SEC rushing record". AL.com. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  51. ^ "Alabama RB Derrick Henry breaks SEC record for single season rushing TDs". AL.com. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  52. ^ "Alabama's Henry runs off with Heisman victory". ESPN.com. December 12, 2015. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  53. ^ "Bama's Henry wins Maxwell, Doak Walker awards". ESPN.com. December 11, 2015. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  54. ^ NFL Scouting Combine profile
  55. ^ "NFL Events: Combine Player Profiles – Derrick Henry". NFL.com. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  56. ^ "*Derrick Henry – Alabama, RB : 2016 NFL Draft Scout Player Profile". NFL Draft Scout. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  57. ^ "2016 NFL Draft Listing". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  58. ^ "Draft Finder Query Results". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  59. ^ "2016 Tennessee Titans Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  60. ^ Patra, Kevin (May 9, 2016). "Tennessee Titans sign Derrick Henry to rookie contract". NFL.com. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
  61. ^ "Ourlads.com: Tennessee Titan's depth chart". ourlads.com. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
  62. ^ "Minnesota Vikings at Tennessee Titans – September 11th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  63. ^ "Jacksonville Jaguars at Tennessee Titans – October 27th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  64. ^ "Tennessee Titans at Kansas City Chiefs – December 18th, 2016". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  65. ^ "Houston Texans at Tennessee Titans – January 1st, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  66. ^ NFL Rookie rushing statistics, 2015
  67. ^ a b "Derrick Henry 2016 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  68. ^ "NFL Player Profile: Derrick Henry". NFL.com. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
  69. ^ "Tennessee Titans at Jacksonville Jaguars – September 17th, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  70. ^ "Indianapolis Colts at Tennessee Titans – October 16th, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  71. ^ "Houston Texans at Tennessee Titans – December 3rd, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  72. ^ "Jacksonville Jaguars at Tennessee Titans – December 31st, 2017". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  73. ^ "2017 NFL Regular Season Standings – National Football League". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  74. ^ "Titans Beat Jaguars, Punch Ticket to Playoffs". Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  75. ^ "DeMarco Murray will not play against Chiefs Saturday". SI.com. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  76. ^ "Wild Card – Tennessee Titans at Kansas City Chiefs – January 6th, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 30, 2018.
  77. ^ a b "Derrick Henry". ESPN.com. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  78. ^ "Divisional Round – Tennessee Titans at New England Patriots – January 13th, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  79. ^ "Derrick Henry 2017 Game Log". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved February 18, 2018.
  80. ^ "With Marcus Mariota sidelined, Derrick Henry operates Titans' offense out of Wildcat". The Tennessean. Retrieved October 3, 2018.
  81. ^ "Derrick Henry". ESPN.com. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  82. ^ "Titans' Derrick Henry sets franchise rushing record on four-touchdown night". The Tennessean. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  83. ^ "All 200-yard, 4-TD rushing games in NFL history". pro-football-reference.com. Retrieved December 7, 2018.
  84. ^ "Most rushing yards, single game, 2018 season". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2019-03-01.
  85. ^ Knoblauch, Austin (December 12, 2018). "Derrick Henry, Amari Cooper among NFL Players of the Week". NFL.com.
  86. ^ "Tennessee Titans at New York Giants – December 16th, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com.
  87. ^ "Washington Redskins at Tennessee Titans – December 22nd, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  88. ^ "Indianapolis Colts at Tennessee Titans – December 30th, 2018". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  89. ^ "Titans' Derrick Henry among NFL Players of the Month". NFL.com. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  90. ^ "Derrick Henry eclipses 1,000 yards rushing for first time". Tennessee Titans. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  91. ^ "Derrick Henry breaks Titans rushing record". Tennessee Titans. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  92. ^ "Derrick Henry focused on helping Titans win, not reaching 1,000 rushing yards". timesfreepress.com. 2018-12-19. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  93. ^ "Derrick Henry joins list of Titans/Oilers greats with playoff performance". AL.com. Retrieved January 30, 2019.
  94. ^ "Derrick Henry ties NFL record with historic 99-yard TD". NFL.com. Retrieved January 30, 2019.

External links

2013 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2013 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama" or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2013 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It was the Crimson Tide's 119th overall season, 80th as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and its 22nd within the SEC Western Division. The team was led by head coach Nick Saban, in his seventh year, and played its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. They finished the season with a record of eleven wins and two losses (11–2 overall, 7–1 in the SEC) and with a loss in the 2014 Sugar Bowl to Oklahoma.

After they captured the 2012 national championship, the Crimson Tide signed a highly rated recruiting class in February 2013 and completed spring practice the following April. With thirteen returning starters from the previous season, Alabama entered the 2013 season as the two-time defending national champions, ranked as the number one team in the nation and as a favorite to win the Western Division, the SEC and national championships. The Crimson Tide opened the season with eleven consecutive victories that included one over Virginia Tech at a neutral site, against Texas A&M in a game that saw many team records broken and an emotional victory over Louisiana State University (LSU) at Bryant–Denny Stadium. In their twelfth game, Alabama was upset by Auburn. The loss, in a game known since as "Kick Six," kept the Crimson Tide out of the SEC Championship Game. Although they did not qualify to play for their third consecutive national championship with a final BCS ranking of third, Alabama did accept an invitation to play in the Sugar Bowl. Against Oklahoma, the Crimson Tide lost 45–31.

At the conclusion of the season, Alabama's defense was nationally ranked near the top in total defense, scoring defense, rushing defense and ranked passing defense. Offensively, the Alabama offense ranked 17th in scoring offense, 24th in rushing offense, 33rd in total offense and 49th in passing offense. Additionally, several players were recognized for their individual accomplishments on the field. C. J. Mosley won the Butkus Award as the top collegiate linebacker; AJ McCarron won both the Maxwell Award as the overall player of the year and the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award as the top senior quarterback. Also, four players were named to various All-America Teams with C. J. Mosley being a unanimous selection and Ha Ha Clinton-Dix and Cyrus Kouandjio being consensus selections.

2015 Alabama Crimson Tide football team

The 2015 Alabama Crimson Tide football team (variously "Alabama", "UA", "Bama", or "The Tide") represented the University of Alabama in the 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season. It marked the Crimson Tide's 121st overall season, 82nd as a member of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and its 24th within the SEC Western Division. The team played its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. They were led by ninth-year head coach Nick Saban. They finished the season with a record of 14 wins and 1 loss (14–1 overall, 7–1 in the SEC), as SEC champions and as consensus national champions after they defeated Clemson in the College Football Playoff (CFP) National Championship Game. Alabama also secured its 10th Associated Press (AP) national title.

2015 All-SEC football team

The 2015 All-SEC football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Southeastern Conference (SEC) chosen by the Associated Press (AP) and the conference coaches for the 2015 Southeastern Conference football season.

The Alabama Crimson Tide won the conference, beating the Florida Gators 29 to 15 in the SEC Championship.

Alabama running back and Heisman Trophy recipient Derrick Henry was unanimously voted the AP SEC Offensive Player of the Year. Alabama linebacker Reggie Ragland was voted the AP SEC Defensive Player of the Year.

2015 Cotton Bowl Classic (December)

The 2015 Cotton Bowl Classic was a college football bowl game played on December 31, 2015 at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. The 80th Cotton Bowl Classic was a College Football Playoff semifinal between Alabama and Michigan State with the winner to compete in the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship. It was one of the 2015–16 bowl games that concluded the 2015 FBS football season.

The game was broadcast on ESPN, ESPN Deportes, ESPN Radio and XM Satellite Radio. It was sponsored by the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company and was officially known as the College Football Playoff Semifinal at the Goodyear Cotton Bowl Classic.

Alabama defeated Michigan State 38–0 and later won the National Championship by defeating Clemson in the National Championship game.

2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season

The 2015 NCAA Division I FBS football season was the highest level of college football competition in the United States organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The regular season began on September 3, 2015 and ended on December 12, 2015. The postseason concluded on January 11, 2016 with Alabama defeating Clemson in the 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship. This was the second season of the College Football Playoff (CFP) championship system.

2016 College Football Playoff National Championship

The 2016 College Football Playoff National Championship was a bowl game that determined a national champion of NCAA Division I FBS college football for the 2015 season. It was played at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona on January 11, 2016, and was the culminating game of the 2015–16 bowl season.

The game was played between the winners of two pre-designated semifinal bowls played on December 31, 2015: the No. 1 Clemson Tigers, who beat the No. 4 Oklahoma Sooners 37–17 at the Orange Bowl, coached by Dabo Swinney in his 8th season, and the No. 2 Alabama Crimson Tide, who shut out the No. 3 Michigan State Spartans 38–0 at the Cotton Bowl Classic, coached by Nick Saban.

The 13–1 Alabama Crimson Tide won the game, holding off the undefeated Clemson Tigers 45–40 in the fourth quarter. Accompanied by a talented receiving corps, Clemson's Heisman Finalist quarterback Deshaun Watson had a historic performance, setting the record for most total yards in national championship game history, with 478 yards (405 passing / 73 rushing) against the nation's third-ranked defense in Alabama, breaking the record previously set by Vince Young in the 2006 Rose Bowl. Following the game, the AP Poll also named Alabama as its top team of the season, giving Alabama their fourth title in seven seasons. Both Clemson and Alabama finished the season 14–1.

Alabama Crimson Tide football

The Alabama Crimson Tide football program represents the University of Alabama (variously Alabama, UA, or Bama) in the sport of American football. The team competes in the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The team is currently coached by Nick Saban. The Crimson Tide is among the most storied and decorated football programs in NCAA history. Since beginning play in 1892, the program claims 17 national championships, including 12 wire-service (AP or Coaches) national titles in the poll-era, and five other titles before the poll-era. From 1958 to 1982, the team was led by Hall of Fame coach Paul "Bear" Bryant, who won six national championships with the program. Despite numerous national and conference championships, it was not until 2009 that an Alabama player received a Heisman Trophy, when running back Mark Ingram became the university's first winner. In 2015, Derrick Henry became the university's second Heisman winner.Alabama has 905 official victories in NCAA Division I (an additional 21 victories were vacated and 8 victories and 1 tie were forfeited), has won 31 conference championships (4 Southern Conference and 27 SEC championships) and has made an NCAA-record 69 postseason bowl appearances. Other NCAA records include 23 winning streaks of 10 games or more and 19 seasons with a 10–0 start. The program has 34 seasons with 10 wins or more (plus one vacated), and has 41 bowl victories, both NCAA records. Alabama has completed 10 undefeated seasons, 9 of which were perfect seasons. The Crimson Tide leads the SEC West Division with 14 division titles and 12 appearances in the SEC Championship Game. Alabama holds a winning record against every current and former SEC school. The Associated Press (AP) ranks Alabama 4th in all-time final AP Poll appearances, with 53 through the 2015 season.Alabama plays its home games at Bryant–Denny Stadium, located on the campus in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. With a capacity of 101,821, Bryant-Denny is the 8th largest non-racing stadium in the world and the seventh largest stadium in the United States.

Alabama Crimson Tide football statistical leaders

Alabama Crimson Tide football statistical leaders identify individual statistical leaders of the Alabama Crimson Tide football program in various offensive categories, including passing, rushing, and receptions and defensive categories, including tackles, interceptions and quarterback sacks. Within those areas, the lists identify single-game, single-season and career leaders. The Alabama Crimson Tide football program is a college football team that represents the University of Alabama in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Southeastern Conference (SEC).

Passing leaders applies to various statistical categories held by quarterbacks. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 2010 to 2013 seasons, AJ McCarron graduated as Alabama's career leader in passing yardage (9,019), completions (686) and touchdowns (77). Alabama's current starting quarterback, Tua Tagovailoa, holds the record for passing yards in a single season, with 3,966 yards in 2018. Tagovailoa also holds the record for passing touchdowns in a single season, with 43 in 2018. John Parker Wilson holds the record for completions in a single season (255), set during the 2007 season. Scott Hunter holds the record for passing yards in a single game (484), set against Auburn in 1969; Gary Hollingsworth holds the school's record for most completions in a game (32), set against Tennessee and shares the record for touchdowns in a game (5), set against Ole Miss during the 1989 season. Tagovailoa tied the record for touchdowns in a game in the 2018 Iron Bowl against Auburn.Rushing leaders applies to various statistical categories held by offensive players who advance the ball rushing. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 1996 to 1999 seasons, Shaun Alexander graduated as Alabama's career leader in rushes (727) and rushing yardage (3,565), though his yardage record was broken by Derrick Henry, who accrued 3,591 rushing yards from 2013 to 2015. Mark Ingram Jr. holds the record for career rushing touchdowns (42), set during his career that spanned from 2008 to 2010; this record has since been tied by Derrick Henry. All three major single-season rushing records were set by Henry in 2015: rushes (395), yards (2,219), and touchdowns (28). Single-game records include Henry for rushes (46) set against Auburn during the 2015 season in which he won the Heisman Trophy; Alexander for yardage (291) set against LSU during the 1996 season; and both Alexander and Santonio Beard for touchdowns (5) set against BYU and Ole Miss during the 1998 and 2002 seasons respectively.Receiving leaders applies to various statistical categories held by offensive players who advance the ball by catching Forward passes. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 2004 to 2007 seasons, D. J. Hall graduated as Alabama's career leader in receptions (194) and receiving yardage (2,923). Amari Cooper holds the record for career receiving touchdowns (20), set during his career that spanned from the 2012 to 2014 seasons. Receiving single-season records include Julio Jones with receptions (78) and receiving yards (1,133), and Amari Cooper with touchdown receptions (11) set during the 2010 and 2012 seasons respectively. Single game records for receptions (13) was set against Tennessee during the 2007 season by Hall and against Florida Atlantic during the 2014 season by Cooper; Jones for yardage (221) set against Tennessee during the 2010 season; and Homan, Michael Vaughn and Al Lary for touchdown receptions (3).In addition to offensive records, many who have played for the Crimson Tide have set various defensive records. After his career with the Crimson Tide that spanned from the 1983 to 1986 seasons, Wayne Davis graduated as Alabama's career leader in tackles (327); Woodrow Lowe as the single-season leader with 134 in 1974; DeMeco Ryans set the single-game record with 25 against Arkansas in 2003. After his career at Alabama that spanned from the 1990 to 1993 seasons, Antonio Langham graduated as Alabama's career leader in interceptions (19); Hootie Ingram as the single-season leader with 10 in 1952; and several players tied with the single game record of three. Derrick Thomas holds every Alabama record for quarterback sacks with 52 during his career from the 1985 to 1988 seasons, 27 in 1988 and five in a single game against Texas A&M in 1988.These stats are updated through the end of the 2018 season.

Derrick Henry Lehmer

Derrick Henry "Dick" Lehmer (February 23, 1905 – May 22, 1991) was an American mathematician who refined Édouard Lucas' work in the 1930s and devised the Lucas–Lehmer test for Mersenne primes. Lehmer's peripatetic career as a number theorist, with he and his wife taking numerous types of work in the United States and abroad to support themselves during the Great Depression, fortuitously brought him into the center of research into early electronic computing.

Derrick Norman Lehmer

Derrick Norman Lehmer (27 July 1867 – 8 September 1938) was an American mathematician and number theorist.

He was educated at the University of Nebraska, obtaining a bachelor's degree in 1893 and master's in 1896. Lehmer was awarded his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1900 for a thesis Asymptotic Evaluation of Certain Totient-Sums under the supervision of E. H. Moore.

He was appointed instructor in mathematics at the University of California at Berkeley in 1900 and married Clara Eunice Mitchell on 12 July 1900 in Decatur, Illinois. He was promoted to professor at Berkeley in 1918 and continued to teach there until retiring in 1937.

In 1903, he presented a factorization of Jevons' number (8,616,460,799) at the San Francisco Section of the American Mathematical Society, December 19, 1903.He published tables of prime numbers and prime factorizations, reaching 10,017,000 by 1909. He developed a variety of mechanical and electro-mechanical factoring and computational devices, such as the Lehmer sieve, built with his son Derrick Henry Lehmer.

Doak Walker Award

The Doak Walker Award, first awarded in 1990, honors the top running back in college football in the United States. It is named in honor of Doak Walker, a star halfback in college for the SMU Mustangs and in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions. The 2018 winner of the Doak Walker Award was Jonathan Taylor of Wisconsin.

The award requires all candidates to be:

in good academic standing, and

on schedule to graduate within one year of students in their eligibility classification.The award recipient receives a sculpture of Doak Walker, cast in bronze and mounted on a wooden base. It was created by artist Blair Buswell, who has sculpted the busts of more than a dozen inductees in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

H. J. Woodall

Herbert J. Woodall was a British mathematician.

In 1925 Lt.-Col. Allan J.C. Cunningham and Woodall gathered together all that was known about the primality and factorization of such numbers and published a small book of tables. "These tables collected from scattered sources the known prime factors for the bases 2 and 10 and also presented the authors' results of thirty years' work with these and the other bases."

Since 1925 many people have worked on filling in these tables. It is likely that this project is the longest, ongoing computational project in history. Derrick Henry Lehmer, a well known mathematician who died in 1991 was for many years a leader of these efforts. Professor Lehmer was a mathematician who was at the forefront of computing as modern electronic computers became a reality. He was also known as the inventor of some ingenious pre-electronic computing devices specifically designed for factoring numbers. These devices are currently in storage at the Computer Museum in Boston.

A generalized Woodall number is defined to be a number of the form

nbn − 1,where n + 2 > b; if a prime can be written in this form, it is then called a generalized Woodall prime.

Lehmer

Lehmer is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Derrick Norman Lehmer (1867–1938), number theorist who produced tables of prime factors and mechanical devices like Lehmer sieves

Derrick Henry Lehmer (1905–1991), number theorist known for Lucas–Lehmer test, son of D. N. Lehmer and husband of Emma Lehmer

Emma Lehmer (1906–2007), Russian mathematician, known for her work on reciprocity laws, wife of D. H. Lehmer

Kat Lehmer, American film director, writer, actor and artist

Lehmer's GCD algorithm

Lehmer's GCD algorithm, named after Derrick Henry Lehmer, is a fast GCD algorithm, an improvement on the simpler but slower Euclidean algorithm. It is mainly used for big integers that have a representation as a string of digits relative to some chosen numeral system base, say β = 1000 or β = 232.

Lehmer matrix

In mathematics, particularly matrix theory, the n×n Lehmer matrix (named after Derrick Henry Lehmer) is the constant symmetric matrix defined by

Alternatively, this may be written as

Lehmer mean

In mathematics, the Lehmer mean of a tuple of positive real numbers, named after Derrick Henry Lehmer, is defined as:

The weighted Lehmer mean with respect to a tuple of positive weights is defined as:

The Lehmer mean is an alternative to power means for interpolating between minimum and maximum via arithmetic mean and harmonic mean.

Lehmer sieve

Lehmer sieves are mechanical devices that implement sieves in number theory. Lehmer sieves are named for Derrick Norman Lehmer and his son Derrick Henry Lehmer. The father was a professor of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley at the time, and his son followed in his footsteps as a number theorist and professor at Berkeley.

A sieve in general is intended to find the numbers which are remainders when a set of numbers are divided by a second set. Generally, they are used in finding solutions of Diophantine equations or to factor numbers. A Lehmer sieve will signal that such solutions are found in a variety of ways depending on the particular construction.

Peter J. Weinberger

Peter Jay Weinberger (born August 6, 1942) is a computer scientist best known for his early work at Bell Labs. He now works at Google.

Weinberger was an undergraduate at Swarthmore College, graduating in 1964. He received his PhD in mathematics (number theory) in 1969 from the University of California, Berkeley under Derrick Henry Lehmer for a thesis entitled "Proof of a Conjecture of Gauss on Class Number Two". After holding a position in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he continued his work in analytic number theory, he moved to AT&T Bell Labs.

At Bell Labs, Weinberger contributed to the design of the AWK programming language (he is the "W" in AWK), and the Fortran compiler f77. A detailed explanation of his contributions to AWK and other Unix tools is found in an interview transcript at Princeton University.

Another interview sheds some light on his work at Google.Both interviews also confirm rumors about his involvement in early digital photography, especially the abuse of a photograph of his face for demonstrating digital imaging effects. When Peter Weinberger was promoted to head of Computer Science Research at Bell Labs, his picture was merged with the AT&T "death star" logo of the mid-80s, creating the PJW Face image that has appeared in innumerable locations, including T-shirts, coffee mugs, CDs, and at least one water tower. The sole remaining PJW Face at Bell Labs is somewhat in disarray, but there are plans afoot to repair it.

Prior to joining Google, Weinberger was chief technology officer at Renaissance Technologies. Weinberger has been a member of the JASON defense advisory group since 1990. He has an Erdos Number of 2.

Yulee High School

Yulee High School is a comprehensive four-year school located in Yulee, Florida. The original school closed in 1965 when Florida desegregated public schools, with students were allowed to choose to attend West Nassau or Fernandina Beach. The current institution opened in 2006, although Yulee had been the site of a high school earlier, from the 1930s to the 1960s. The initial graduating class of Yulee High School, in 2007, had a 71% graduation rate, 23% of whom graduated with honors.

The mascot of the sports teams for YHS is the Hornet.

Tennessee Titans current roster
Active roster
Reserve lists
Free agents

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.