Deron Cherry

Deron Leigh Cherry (born September 12, 1959) is a retired professional American football free safety who played for the Kansas City Chiefs from 1981 to 1991. Deron was a free safety and punter at Rutgers University. In 1979, he was named the team’s MVP. In 1979 and 1980, Cherry earned AP All-East honors. In 1981, he was signed by the Kansas City Chiefs, as a free agent punter, but was released in the final cutdown. Cherry rejoined the club in late September as a safety, and made his first interception in October against the Oakland Raiders.

Cherry played high school football at Palmyra High School in Palmyra, New Jersey.[1]

Regarded as one of the best free safeties to have ever played the game, he was a six-time Pro Bowl selection from 1983–1988, starting in five of them in his 11 years with the Chiefs. Few other Chiefs players have been selected to this number of Pro Bowls. He had six 100 tackle seasons in his eleven years as a member of the Chiefs, with a career total of 927 tackles. He was a 5 time All-Pro in 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, and 1988. He was also a five-time 1st team All-AFC and two time 2nd team All-AFC selection. Cherry's 15 career fumble recoveries place him in a three-way tie for the Chiefs record. He ranks third on the Chiefs list of most interceptions, and is only the 26th player in the history of the NFL to reach the 50 interception plateau. In 1987, he was selected to the Chiefs 25 year All-Time Team.

In 1987, he won the Byron "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year Award.[2] Prior to receiving this award, he was the Chiefs NFL Man of the Year selection in 1987. This is the most prestigious award given by the NFL Players Association.[3]

He is actively involved in several civic organizations, including Special Olympics, Muscular Dystrophy Association, Project Warmth, Score 1 for Health, and the United Negro College Fund. Throughout the past 25 years Deron has hosted his Celebrity Invitational. This tournament has raised over $3 million to support the children of the Kansas City area. Cherry is a frequent guest speaker at civic, charitable, and corporate events throughout the country.

In 1995, Cherry became a limited ownership partner in one of the NFL’s then-new expansion teams, the Jacksonville Jaguars. This made him the first minority owner of an NFL franchise in the league's history. Cherry is also a managing general partner with United Beverage, a local Anheuser-Busch distributor.

Deron Cherry
refer to caption
Cherry in 2014
No. 20
Position:Free safety
Personal information
Born:September 12, 1959 (age 59)
Riverside, New Jersey
Career information
High school:Palmyra (NJ)
College:Rutgers
Undrafted:1981
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:927
Sacks:3.5
Defensive touchdowns:1
Interceptions:50
Fumble recoveries:15
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ Deron Cherry Archived 2007-09-30 at the Wayback Machine, Database Football. Accessed January 24, 2008.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-08-31. Retrieved 2012-10-13.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ http://www.nfl.com/manoftheyear
1978 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1978 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth season under head coach Frank R. Burns, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 9–3 record while competing as an independent. The team outscored its opponents 284 to 165 and finished the season with a 34–18 loss to Arizona State in the Garden State Bowl. The team's statistical leaders included Bob Hering with 1,193 passing yards, Glen Kehler with 883 rushing yards, and David Dorn with 535 receiving yards. It was the Scarlet Knights' first major bowl appearance.

1980 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team

The 1980 Rutgers Scarlet Knights football team represented Rutgers University in the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their eighth season under head coach Frank R. Burns, the Scarlet Knights compiled a 7–4 record while competing as an independent and outscored their opponents 279 to 156. The team's statistical leaders included Ed McMichael with 1,761 passing yards, Albert Ray with 778 rushing yards, and Tim Odell with 718 receiving yards.

1983 All-Pro Team

The 1983 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1983. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The NEA chose two inside linebackers for the first time, as a reflection of the 3-4 which was the common alignment for NFL defenses in the mid-1980s.

1983 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1983 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 14th season in the National Football League and the 24th overall. They matched on their 6–10 record and last place finish in the AFC West.

The Chiefs fired head coach Marv Levy on January 4 after compiling a 31–42 record. Dallas Cowboys quarterbacks coach John Mackovic was named the fifth head coach in team history on February 2. The 39-year-old Mackovic became the youngest individual ever to hold that post for the club. The Chiefs held the seventh overall pick in the 1983 NFL Draft and selected quarterback Todd Blackledge. The Chiefs would not draft another quarterback in the first round until the 2017 NFL Draft when they drafted Patrick Mahomes.

Tragedy struck the Chiefs on June 29 when Joe Delaney drowned while attempting to save the lives of three children in Monroe, Louisiana. Delaney was posthumously awarded the Presidential Citizen's Medal by Ronald Reagan on July 13. Linebacker Bobby Bell became the first Chiefs player to be inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on July 30, providing some solace for the mourning Chiefs fan base following Joe Delaney's death.

With Bill Kenney and Todd Blackledge both on the roster, starting Steve Fuller was traded to the Los Angeles Rams on August 19. Kenney earned a Pro Bowl berth after racking up a franchise-record 4,348 passing yards, while wide receiver Carlos Carson hauled in 80 passes for 1,351 yards. Despite the team's high-flying passing game, head coach John Mackovic had trouble finding a suitable replacement for Joe Delaney and the running back position. The highest scoring contest in franchise history took place as the Chiefs and Seattle Seahawks combined for 99 points in a wild, 51–48 overtime loss at the Kingdome. A meager crowd of 11,377 braved near-zero degree temperatures to attend the club's season-ending 48–17 win against Denver on December 18, the smallest attendance figure ever for a Chiefs game at Arrowhead as the club finished the year at 6–10.

1984 All-Pro Team

The 1984 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1984. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1984 the Pro Football Writers Association chose only one defensive tackle and two inside linebackers in a pure 3-4 format. Pro Football Weekly added a "Special Teams" player, a non-returner who excelled in special teams play.

1984 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1984 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 15th season in the National Football League, the 23rd as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 25th overall.

Pro Bowl safety Gary Barbaro became the most notable Chiefs player to defect to the rival United States Football League, signing with the New Jersey Generals on February 2 after sitting out the entire 1983 campaign due to a contract dispute. Barbaro's departure and the trade of cornerback Gary Green began a youth movement that produced the most vaunted secondary in team history. Cornerbacks Kevin Ross and Albert Lewis, and safeties Deron Cherry and Lloyd Burruss accounted for a combined 13 Pro Bowl appearances for the Chiefs in the years to come.

All-America defensive tackle Bill Maas and offensive tackle John Alt were both selected in the first round of the 1984 NFL Draft. Maas was named NFL Defensive Rookie of the Year, while Alt eventually became the cornerstone of the club's offensive line later in the decade. Kansas City's defense registered a team-record 11.0 sacks in a 10–6 win against Cleveland on September 30, coming one sack shy of the NFL single-game record.Quarterback Bill Kenney suffered a broken thumb during the preseason and was sidelined until the season's seventh week. Second-year backup Quarterback Todd Blackledge opened the first six contests of the season and had the club at 3–3. Kenney returned to the starting lineup against the New York Jets on October 21, but inconsistency marked the rest of the season as the club dropped four of first five contests after his return. However, the team rattled off three consecutive wins to conclude the year at 8–8.The Chiefs were also involved in infamy during the November 4th game against the Seattle Seahawks, in which the Chiefs QBs threw six interceptions, four of which were returned for touchdowns in a 45-0 loss.

1984 Pro Bowl

The 1984 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 34th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1983 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1984, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 45, AFC 3.

Chuck Knox of the Seattle Seahawks led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by San Francisco 49ers head coach Bill Walsh. The referee was Jerry Seeman.Joe Theismann of the Washington Redskins was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1985 All-Pro Team

The 1985 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News in 1985. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

Pro Football Weekly, which suspended operations in 1985, did not choose an All-Pro team.

1985 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1985 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 16th season in the National Football League and the 26th overall.

The Chiefs got off to a great start in 1985 with a 47–27 win at New Orleans, while safety Deron Cherry tied an NFL record by registering four interceptions in a 28–7 win against Seattle on September 29 as the club boasted a 3–1 record four games into the season. The club was then confronted with a seven-game losing streak (amidst, nonetheless, the neighboring Kansas City Royals's World Series run) that wasn’t snapped until quarterback Todd Blackledge was installed as the starter against Indianapolis on November 24. The team rebounded to win three of its final five contests of the year with Blackledge under center, further inflaming a quarterback controversy that continued into the 1986 season.Among these wins was the first time since 1972 that the Chiefs played the Atlanta Falcons, and merely the second in team history. The reason for this is that before the admission of the Texans in 2002, NFL scheduling formulas for games outside a team's division were much more influenced by table position during the previous season.One of the few remaining bright spots in a disappointing 6–10 season came in the regular season finale against San Diego when wide receiver Stephone Paige set an NFL record with 309 receiving yards in a 38–34 win, breaking the previous mark of 303 yards set by Cleveland's Jim Benton in 1945. Paige's mark was subsequently surpassed by a 336-yard effort by Flipper Anderson (Los Angeles Rams) in 1989.

1986 All-Pro Team

The 1986 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1986. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1986 the AP chose two defensive tackles (one a nose-tackle) rather than two defensive tackles and one nose tackles as they had done since 1981. The Pro Football Writers Association returned to a 4-3 format for their 1986 defense.

1986 Pro Bowl

The 1986 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 36th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1985 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 2, 1986, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was NFC 28, AFC 24.Don Shula of the Miami Dolphins led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach John Robinson. The referee was Bob McElwee.Phil Simms of the New York Giants was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1987 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1987 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 18th season in the National Football League and the 28th overall.

Under new head coach Frank Gansz, The Chiefs split their first two games never recovered and the Chiefs replacement players went 0-3. After the regulars returned, the Chiefs continued to struggle losing their next four games to stand at 1-8. The Chiefs would go on to finish with a disappointing 4-11 record, a year after making the playoffs in 1986.

1987 Pro Bowl

The 1987 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 37th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1986 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1987, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was AFC 10, NFC 6.Marty Schottenheimer of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Washington Redskins head coach Joe Gibbs. The referee was Dick Jorgensen.Reggie White of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning AFC team received $10,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $5,000.

1988 All-Pro Team

The 1988 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly and The Sporting News in 1988. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1988 the Associated Press did not choose a kick returner.

1988 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1988 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 19th season in the National Football League and the 29th overall.

Bill Kenney opened the team's initial two games at quarterback, but was replaced by DeBerg for the second half against Seattle. DeBerg guided the team to a 20–13 win against Denver in his initial start as a member of the Chiefs. However, six losses and a tie followed as Kenney and DeBerg jostled for the QB job.

As the season drew to a close, it became apparent the winds of change were blowing across the organization. President Jack Steadman resigned on December 8, while general manager Jim Schaaf was relieved of his duties the same day. Steadman was later named chairman of the board. On the field, the Chiefs finished the year at 4–11–1 as questions swirled regarding head coach Frank Gansz's future and who would fill the club's leadership void. One day after the season's conclusion, former Philadelphia Eagles and United States Football League executive Carl Peterson was named the club's president/general manager and chief operating officer on December 19.

1988 Pro Bowl

The 1988 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 38th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1987 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 7, 1988, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was AFC 15, NFC 6.Marty Schottenheimer of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Minnesota Vikings head coach Jerry Burns. The referee was Dick Hantak.Bruce Smith of the Buffalo Bills was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning AFC team received $10,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $5,000.

1989 Pro Bowl

The 1989 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 39th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1988 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1989, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,113. The final score was NFC 34, AFC 3.Marv Levy of the Buffalo Bills led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Chicago Bears head coach Mike Ditka. The referee was Ben Dreith.Randall Cunningham of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.It was the last Pro Bowl game played in January for two decades, until the 2010 Pro Bowl.

Kansas City Chiefs awards

This page details awards won by the Kansas City Chiefs, a professional American football team from the National Football League. The Chiefs have never had a winner of the Coach of the Year award, Offensive Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year. The Chiefs are tied with the Chicago Bears for the most winners of the Walter Payton Man of the Year award with 5.

The most recent winner of a major NFL award is Patrick Mahomes who won league MVP for the 2018 season, the Chiefs first ever winner of league MVP.

The Chiefs have two awards that are awarded by the team which are voted on by the players and coaches. The Derrick Thomas award is awarded to the team MVP and the Mack Lee Hill award is awarded to the Rookie of the Year.

List of National Football League career interceptions leaders

This is the list of National Football League (NFL) players, who have recorded at least 50 interceptions.

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