Derland Moore

Derland Paul Moore (born October 7, 1951, in Malden, Missouri) is a former American football defensive lineman in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints and the New York Jets. An All-American, he played college football at the University of Oklahoma and was selected in the second round of the 1973 NFL Draft. At the time he was drafted, Moore was the highest selected college walk-on in history of the NFL Draft, a distinction overtaken by fellow Oklahoma Sooner Baker Mayfield, the overall number one draft pick in 2018. Moore would go on to set a team record for service with 169 games played in 13 seasons with the New Orleans Saints, playing for five permanent head coaches and three interim coaches in that time.

He led the team in sacks in 1980, and was selected to the Pro Bowl in 1983. Moore retired from the NFL in 1986 and was later Inducted into the New Orleans Saints Hall of Fame, the New Orleans Saints 40th Anniversary Team, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, and was named as one of the Top 100 Sooners in Oklahoma University football history."1".

Derland Moore
No. 74
Position:Defensive tackle/Nose tackle
Personal information
Born:October 7, 1951 (age 67)
Malden, Missouri
Career information
College:Oklahoma
NFL Draft:1973 / Round: 2 / Pick: 29
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games Played:171
Interceptions:1
Tackles:N/A
Player stats at NFL.com
1971 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1971 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1971 college football season. The selectors for the 1971 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1972 All-Big Eight Conference football team

The 1972 All-Big Eight Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Eight Conference teams for the 1972 college football season. The selectors for the 1972 season included the Associated Press (AP).

1972 Oklahoma Sooners football team

The 1972 Oklahoma Sooners football team represented the University of Oklahoma in the 1972 NCAA University Division football season. Oklahoma was a member of the Big Eight Conference and played its home games in Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, where it has played its home games since 1923. The team posted an 11–1 overall record and were 6–1 in conference, later changed to 8–4 and 3–4. This was Chuck Fairbanks' last season as Sooner head coach; he left for the New England Patriots of the NFL.

There is actually a discrepancy as to the Sooners' 1972 record. The NCAA never officially forced Oklahoma to forfeit games, having only penalized scholarships, TV appearances, bowl appearances, etc. Oklahoma had used players (including Kerry Jackson, the team's first black quarterback) with falsified transcripts and at one point volunteered to forfeit all its games. Eventually, the Big Eight asked them to forfeit three conference victories (Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma State) despite the fact that the NCAA still recognizes them, but Oklahoma now recognizes these as wins and claims the 1972 conference title.Oklahoma was led by four All-Americans: Rod Shoate (OU's second three-time All-American), Greg Pruitt, Tom Brahaney and Derland Moore. This was the first season that the Selmon brothers Lucious, Lee Roy and Dewey, all eventual All-Americans, anchored the defensive line. The Sooners played seven ranked opponents (In order, #10 Texas, #9 Colorado, #14 Iowa State, #14 Missouri, #5 Nebraska, #20 Oklahoma State, and #5 Penn State), and four of these opponents finished the season ranked. Oklahoma's only loss on the field was in the fifth game against Colorado. The team concluded its season with a 14–0 victory over Penn State in the Sugar Bowl on New Year's Eve.Pruitt led the Sooners in rushing with 1024 yards, Dave Robertson led in passing with 1136 yards, and Tinker Owens led in receiving

(for the first of four consecutive seasons) with 430 yards. Pruitt led in scoring with 86 points, Shoate in tackles with 145, and Dan Ruster in interceptions with seven.The 1972 Sooners twice posted 37 first downs, which was a school record that stood for 16 seasons.

1973 New Orleans Saints season

The 1973 New Orleans Saints season was the team's seventh as a member of the National Football League (NFL). They improved on their previous season's output of 2–11–1, winning five games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the seventh consecutive season.

New Orleans made a disastrous trade in January, dealing the No. 2 overall selection in the 1973 NFL Draft to the Baltimore Colts for defensive end Billy Newsome. The Colts used the traded pick to select LSU quarterback Bert Jones, who guided the team to three consecutive AFC East division championships from 1975–77.

J.D. Roberts, who became the Saints' second head coach midway through the 1970 season, was fired August 27, two days after a 31-6 loss to the New England Patriots in the fourth exhibition game. Roberts was replaced by offensive backfield coach John North. Roberts ended his Saints tenure with a 7-25-3 mark.

The Saints opened the year with a 62–7 loss to the Atlanta Falcons at home. The first quarter of that game was scoreless. Eight days later, they were destroyed on Monday Night Football by the Dallas Cowboys, 40-3.

They did however hold O. J. Simpson to 74 yard on 20 carries in the team's first ever shut-out, with a 13–0 win over the Buffalo Bills. Simpson went on to break the single season rushing record in yardage that year with 2,003.

1974 New Orleans Saints season

The 1974 New Orleans Saints season was the team's eighth as a member of the National Football League (NFL). This was their final season at Tulane Stadium as the Louisiana Superdome opened the following season. They matched their previous season's output of 5–9. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the eighth consecutive season.

Despite another losing record, the Saints defeated two of the NFC's four playoff entries, ousting the Los Angeles Rams 20-7 in week 10 and the St. Louis Cardinals 14-0 in week 13, both at home. The win over the Cardinals was the Saints' final game at Tulane Stadium.

The Saints ended an 18-game winless streak on the road when they defeated the Atlanta Falcons in week six. However, they would not win again away from New Orleans until 1976. From 1972 through 1975, the Saints were 1-26-1 on the road.

1975 New Orleans Saints season

The 1975 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints ninth season and their first in the newly opened Louisiana Superdome. Despite the new stadium, they failed to match their 1974 output of 5–9, winning only two games and tying the San Diego Chargers for the league’s worst record.

Coach John North, who was hired four games into the 1973 exhibition season, was fired following a 38-14 road loss to the Los Angeles Rams in the sixth game. Director of Player Personnel Ernie Hefferle took over for the final eight games. His only win was his first game in charge, a 23-7 victory at home over the hated Atlanta Falcons.

The Saints were winless on the road for the fourth time in six seasons, leaving them 3-36-3 away from New Orleans since 1970.

1976 New Orleans Saints season

The 1976 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints' tenth year in the National Football League (NFL). Hoping past success could influence the franchise; the Saints hired Hank Stram as the new head coach. However, in Stram's first season at the helm, the Saints continued to struggle finishing with a 4–10 record. The Saints made a uniform change before the year, going from a dark gold to old gold, and have retained the color albeit with minor shading changes since. It was also the team's first season wearing black pants.The high point of the season was in week three, when Stram's Saints traveled to Kansas City and defeated the Chiefs 27-17. Stram rubbed salt in the wounds of the team he coached for 15 seasons (1960-74) and led to the Super Bowl IV championship when Bobby Scott threw a touchdown pass on the game's final play to Tinker Owens. Chiefs coach Paul Wiggin refused to shake hands with Stram, who was carried off the Arrowhead Stadium turf by his players.

1977 New Orleans Saints season

The 1977 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 11th as a member of the National Football League. They were unable to improve on their previous season's output of 4–10, winning only three games. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the eleventh consecutive season, as Coach Hank Stram was fired following the season. In his two years as Coach the Saints only won seven games.

1978 New Orleans Saints season

The 1978 New Orleans Saints season was the Saints 12th season. Quarterback Archie Manning put together one of his finest seasons, earning the NFC Player of the Year award as the Saints finished with a franchise-best 7–9 mark under new head coach Dick Nolan.

1979 New Orleans Saints season

The 1979 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 13th season in the National Football League. The Saints finished the season at 8–8, the franchise's first non-losing season. New Orleans was tied for first place with the Los Angeles Rams in the NFC West with three weeks to play, but the season unraveled in a Monday Night Football contest at home vs. the Oakland Raiders, when the Saints squandered a 35–14 lead and lost, 42–35.

The Saints were eliminated from playoff contention in Week 15 when they were blown out 35–0 at home by the San Diego Chargers. Not counting the 1976 expansion club Seattle, New Orleans was one of three franchises which failed to make the playoffs in the 1970s, joined by the New York Giants and New York Jets.

1980 New Orleans Saints season

The 1980 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 14th as a member of the National Football League. It was unable to improve on the previous season's output of 8–8, winning only one game. The team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fourteenth consecutive season and had the dubious distinction not only of winning only a single game, but winning it by a single point against the equally disappointing Jets, who like the Saints had widely been predicted before the season to advance to their first playoff appearance since 1969.

1982 New Orleans Saints season

The 1982 New Orleans Saints season saw the team nearly qualify for the NFL playoffs, missing it by a tiebreaker. It finished with a 4–5 record, and narrowly missed the playoffs in a complicated labyrinth of tie-breakers.

1983 New Orleans Saints season

The 1983 New Orleans Saints season was the team’s 17th as a member of the National Football League. They improved on their previous season’s output of 4–5, winning eight games. Despite the improvement, the team failed to qualify for the playoffs for the seventeenth consecutive season.

With an 8–7 record going into the final game of the season at the Superdome against the Los Angeles Rams, the Saints, with a win, would have finished with their first winning season and their first playoff berth. However, Rams kicker Mike Lansford kicked a 42-yard field goal with :06 left to defeat the Saints 26-24, and advance to the playoffs. Other than that field goal, the Rams did not score a single point on offense, instead scoring via a punt return for a touchdown, two interception returns for touchdowns, and a safety.

Two weeks earlier the Saints lost to the New England Patriots in shocking conditions with sleet and snow – with the only score being set up by Patriot Ricky Smith returning the initial kickoff to the 3-yard line. As of 2017, this game remains the most recent 7–0 result in NFL history, with only two games since seeing just one score, both a single field goal.Another damaging loss came on Monday Night Football in week 12, when the New York Jets rallied from a 14-point deficit by scoring 17 unanswered points in the fourth quarter, capped off by a 76-yard punt return touchdown by Kirk Springs, to stun the Saints 31-28. The Saints had a chance to force overtime in the closing seconds, but Morten Andersen missed badly to the left on a 51-yard field goal attempt.

1986 New Orleans Saints season

The 1986 New Orleans Saints season was the team's 20th as a member of the National Football League. They bested their previous season's output of 5–11, winning seven games.

Don Reese

Donald Francis Reese (September 4, 1951 – September 18, 2003) was an American football defensive end who played in the National Football League and the United States Football League. He played professionally for the Miami Dolphins, the New Orleans Saints and the San Diego Chargers and the Birmingham Stallions of the USFL.

List of New York Jets players

This is a list of players who have played for American football's New York Jets (1970–present) not including the New York Titans or any AFL players.

List of Oklahoma Sooners football All-Americans

This is a list of Oklahoma Sooners college football players who were named first team All-Americans. The selecting organizations for football All-Americans that the NCAA recognizes include the Associated Press, American Football Coaches Association, Football Writers Association of America, The Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation. The NCAA defines consensus All-Americans as players who were accorded a majority of votes at their positions by these selectors. Unanimous All-Americans are players who were selected by all five selectors.Oklahoma has had 162 first team All-Americans in its history. 80 of these were consensus, and 35 were unanimous. OU has the most unanimous All-Americans in the history of college football.

Poplar Bluff, Missouri

Poplar Bluff is a small city in Butler County in Southeast Missouri in the United States. It is the county seat of Butler County and is known as "The Gateway to the Ozarks" among other names. The population was 17,023 at the 2010 census.

The Poplar Bluff Micropolitan Statistical Area consists of all of Butler County. The city is at the crossroads of U.S. Route 60 and U.S. Route 67.

Poplar Bluff High School

Poplar Bluff High School is a public high school in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, United States. It is a part of the Poplar Bluff R-1 School District.

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