Derek Falvey

Derek Falvey (born March 19, 1983) is an American baseball executive who is currently the Executive Vice President and Chief Baseball Officer for the Minnesota Twins of Major League Baseball (MLB). Prior to joining the Twins, Falvey was an executive for the Cleveland Indians.

Derek Falvey
BornMarch 19, 1983 (age 36)
Alma materTrinity College
OccupationExecutive Vice president / Chief baseball officer
OrganizationMinnesota Twins

Early life and playing career

Falvey grew up in Lynn, Massachusetts. He attended Trinity College, and played college baseball for the Trinity Bantams as a pitcher.[1] He graduated with a degree in economics in 2005.[2]

Executive career

In 2007, Falvey began independently scouting players in the Cape Cod Baseball League and used the experience as an opportunity to connect with scouting personnel and Major League executives. His experience in the league led to an internship with the Cleveland Indians. Derek Falvey grew up in a small home in Lynn, Massachusetts with his parents Candy and Stephen Falvey and sister Shannon Falvey.

Falvey began working for the Cleveland Indians as an intern in 2007.[2] He remained with the Indians, working in the amateur and international scouting departments through 2009 after which he transitioned into Baseball Operations as Assistant Director, Baseball Operations.[3] During the 2011–12 offseason, the Indians promoted Falvey to co-director of baseball operations, along with David Stearns.[4] In 2016, the Indians promoted him to assistant general manager.[5]

Minnesota Twins

On October 3, 2016, the Minnesota Twins hired Falvey as their executive vice president and chief baseball officer.[6] He officially started his duties with the Twins after the Indians lost to the Chicago Cubs in the 2016 World Series. He works with GM Thad Levine. His first big move was signing catcher Jason Castro to a 3 year $24 million dollar contract. [7] On June 12, the Twins had the number 1 overall pick, and they selected shortstop Royce Lewis.[8]

References

  1. ^ Berardino, Mike (November 18, 2016). "New Minnesota Twins execs got their start in Division III baseball". Pioneer Press. Retrieved November 18, 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Cleveland's Derek Falvey will head Twins baseball operations". Star Tribune. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  3. ^ "Five things to know about Derek Falvey". Star Tribune. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  4. ^ Hoynes, Paul (December 15, 2011). "Cleveland Indians hire Derek Falvey, David Stearns as directors of baseball operations". Cleveland Plain Dealer. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  5. ^ "Cleveland Indians mum on Derek Falvey's destination, but love his work". Cleveland Plain Dealer. Retrieved September 28, 2016.
  6. ^ http://www.startribune.com/derek-falvey-officially-named-twins-chief-baseball-officer/395653411/
  7. ^ https://www.mlbtraderumors.com/2016/11/twins-to-sign-jason-castro.html
  8. ^ https://www.mlb.com/news/twins-pick-royce-lewis-no-1-in-2017-draft-c235981054
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Chris Antonetti is the current President of the Cleveland Indians.

Antonetti is a graduate of Georgetown University and University of Massachusetts Amherst. He worked in the front office of the Montreal Expos in 1998. He has worked for the Indians since 1999.

Before the 2010 season, Executive VP/GM Mark Shapiro announced his promotion to team General Manager at season's end, with chairman/CEO Paul Dolan naming Antonetti as Shapiro's successor. The promotion was finalized at the end of the 2010 season.On October 6, 2015, the Cleveland Indians announced they had promoted Antonetti to President of Baseball Operations and promoted Assistant General Manager Mike Chernoff to General Manager. Filling Chernoff’s spot as Assistant GM will be Director of Baseball Operations Derek Falvey.

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