Denny Matthews

Dennis G. "Denny" Matthews (born November 14, 1942) is an American sportscaster, best known as a play-by-play announcer for Major League Baseball's Kansas City Royals since the team's inception in 1969.

Denny Matthews
Born
Dennis G. Matthews

November 14, 1942 (age 76)
Sports commentary career
Team(s)Kansas City Royals (1969–present)
Genre(s)Play-by-play
SportsMajor League Baseball

Early history

Matthews grew up in Bloomington, Illinois, and attended Illinois Wesleyan University, where he played baseball and football, and belonged to the Sigma Chi Fraternity. He worked for local radio and television stations in Peoria and St. Louis before his hiring by the Royals.

Broadcast career

Matthews has broadcast for the Royals since their inception in 1969, when he was the sidekick to Bud Blattner. Blattner retired in 1974, and Matthews has been the Royals' top broadcaster since then. From 1974 to 1998 – a stretch that includes the best seasons in the Royals' history – Matthews was paired with Fred White. In 1999, the two also teamed up to write a book called Play by Play: 25 Years of Royals on Radio, which recounts anecdotes from those seasons. Matthews also called baseball events for the national CBS Radio network in the 1980s.

In 1999, the Royals fired White and replaced him with the younger Ryan Lefebvre. Despite a tremendous age difference, Matthews and Lefebvre integrated their styles well and their dry wit and rapport became popular with Royals fans.

In 2008, Matthews cut back on his broadcast schedule, traveling to fewer road games, turning many of those chores over to Bob Davis and Steve Stewart (who succeeded Lefebvre in the Royals' radio booth while the latter shifted to television). However, Matthews broadcast the first road trip of that season from Detroit and Minnesota while Davis was broadcasting the Kansas Jayhawks' run to the national basketball championship. Matthews handled most of the home schedule and much of the September slate, when Davis turned his attention to broadcasting Jayhawks football games.

Matthews' broadcasts and longevity have made him a popular figure in Kansas City. Baseball historian and statistician Bill James is among his fans, and has written:

His voice has a pleasant timbre which suggests a cheerful occasion. His inflection varies naturally so it's neither falsely enthusiastic nor boring. He has a dry, understated humor that drifts through much of his audience undetected. One cannot learn these things at a microphone; they are given.[1]

Following the retirement of longtime Los Angeles Dodgers announcer Vin Scully (who'd been calling that team's games since 1950) at the end of the 2016 season, Matthews' tenure with the Royals was the second-longest continuous tenure with one team among active Major League Baseball announcers, trailing only that of the Dodgers' Spanish-language broadcaster Jaime Jarrín (1959–present). In January 2015, Matthews signed a contract extension to keep him calling Royals games through his and the team's 50th season in 2018.[2]

Awards

Matthews was inducted into the Royals Hall of Fame in 2004[3] and the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame in 2005.[4] He was presented with the Ford C. Frick Award by the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.[5][6]

Bibliography

  • Denny Matthews, Fred White, and Matt Fulks (1999). Play by Play: 25 Years of Royals on Radio (ISBN 1-886110-78-6)

References

  1. ^ The Bill James Baseball Abstract, 1983
  2. ^ "Royals broadcaster Denny Matthews' new contract ties him to team through 50th season". The Kansas City Star. January 31, 2015. Retrieved February 3, 2015.
  3. ^ http://kansascity.royals.mlb.com/kc/hall_of_fame/member.jsp?name=Matthews
  4. ^ http://www.mosportshalloffame.com/inductee_detail/Denny+Matthews/176
  5. ^ Lifetime achievement (sic) last accessed February 23, 2007.
  6. ^ Royals announcer Matthews wins Ford C. Frick Award last accessed February 23, 2007.

External links

Preceded by
None
Voice of the Royals
1969 – Present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
1973 Kansas City Royals season

The 1973 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing second in the American League West with a record of 88 wins and 74 losses.

1975 Kansas City Royals season

The 1975 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. In the Royals' seventh season, they finished second in the American League West with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses. Manager Jack McKeon was fired on July 24, replaced by Whitey Herzog.

1976 Kansas City Royals season

The 1976 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. They lost in the 1976 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, three games to two.

1983 Kansas City Royals season

The 1983 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 2nd in the American League West with a record of 79 wins and 83 losses.

1984 Kansas City Royals season

The 1984 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 1st in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 78 losses. However, they would lose to the Detroit Tigers in 3 Games in the ALCS. The Tigers would go on to the World Series and defeat the San Diego Padres in 5 Games.

1986 Kansas City Royals season

The 1986 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses.

1987 Kansas City Royals season

The 1987 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 2nd in the American League West with a record of 83 wins and 79 losses.

1991 Kansas City Royals season

The 1991 Kansas City Royals season involved the Royals finishing 6th in the American League West with a record of 82 wins and 80 losses.

1999 Kansas City Royals season

The 1999 Kansas City Royals season involved the Royals finishing 4th in the American League Central with a record of 64 wins and 97 losses.

2004 Kansas City Royals season

The 2004 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 58 wins and 104 losses. It was one of the most disappointing seasons in Royals' history. The team had been picked by many sporting magazines to win the AL Central following their third-place finish in 2003. Injuries of veteran acquisitions did the Royals in. Catcher Benito Santiago and outfielder Juan González both played very few games for the boys in blue. Mike Sweeney was also injured during the campaign. As a result, the Royals set a new record for most losses in franchise history.

2005 Kansas City Royals season

The 2005 Kansas City Royals season began on April 4 and ended October 2. The Royals competed and finished 5th in the American League Central with a record of 56 wins and 106 losses, 43 games behind first place Chicago White Sox. With 106 losses, the Royals set a record for the most losses in a single season in franchise history, and their third 100-loss season in 4 years. The 2005 Kansas City Royals were plagued by abysmal pitching and an anemic offense, and to date have one of the worst Major League Baseball season records of all-time.

2006 Kansas City Royals season

The 2006 Kansas City Royals season was the 38th season for the franchise, and their 36th at Kauffman Stadium. The Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 62 wins and 100 losses and missed the playoffs for the 21st consecutive season.

Fox Sports Kansas City

Fox Sports Kansas City is an American regional sports network owned by Fox Cable Networks, a unit of the Fox Entertainment Group division of 21st Century Fox, and operates as an affiliate of Fox Sports Networks. The channel broadcasts coverage of professional, collegiate, and high school sports events both within and outside the Kansas City area. It maintains offices and master control operations at Kauffman Stadium in Kansas City, Missouri.

Fox Sports Kansas City is available on cable providers throughout western and central Missouri, Kansas, eastern Nebraska, and Iowa; it is also available nationwide on satellite via DirecTV.

List of American League Championship Series broadcasters

The following is a list of the national television and radio networks and announcers that have broadcast American League Championship Series games over the years. It does include any announcers who may have appeared on local broadcasts produced by the participating teams.

List of Kansas City Royals broadcasters

Broadcasters for the Kansas City Royals Major League Baseball team.

Matt Fulks

Matt Fulks is an American sports journalist, author, broadcaster and feature writer. He has written for Kansas City's Metro Sports, and his work has appeared in various newspapers and publications including The Kansas City Star and USA Today's Sports Weekly.

Ryan Lefebvre

Ryan Lefebvre (; born February 12, 1971) is an American sportscaster, best known as a play-by-play announcer for Major League Baseball's Kansas City Royals since 1999. In 2008, he became the primary announcer for Royals' television broadcasts on Fox Sports Kansas City. Lefebvre also provides play-by-play on the Royals Radio Network for some of the games that aren't covered on television, relieving longtime Royals announcer Denny Matthews. Since the 2012 season, he has called most games on radio when Steve Physioc does the play-by-play on TV.Lefebvre was named Most Valuable Player for the Minnesota Golden Gophers in 1993, and made first-team All Big Ten in 1991 and 1993 as an outfielder. He spent one season in the Cleveland Indians minor league system with the Watertown Indians of the New York–Penn League.Lefebvre had also broadcast TV and cable for the Minnesota Twins from 1995 to 1998.

He is the son of former Major League Baseball player and manager Jim Lefebvre.

In early 2006, Lefebvre made public his struggle with depressive illness. Lefebvre also wrote a book detailing his experiences, titled The Shame of Me: One Man's Journey to Depression and Back.

Ryan Lefebvre recently spoke of the importance of his Catholic faith in overcoming depression and gaining a renewed perspective on life.

What We Did on Our Holidays

What We Did on Our Holidays (released as Fairport Convention in the United States) is the 1969 second album by the band Fairport Convention. It was their first album to feature singer-songwriter Sandy Denny, whose "haunting, ethereal vocals gave Fairport a big boost", according to Richie Unterberger. The album also showed a move towards the folk rock for which they became noted, including tracks later to become perennial favourites such as "Fotheringay" and the song traditionally used to close live concerts, "Meet on the Ledge".

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