Dennis Leonard

Dennis Patrick Leonard (born May 8, 1951) is a former pitcher for the Kansas City Royals in the late 1970s and early 1980s. He retired in 1986 due to injuries.

Born in Brooklyn, Leonard attended Oceanside High School on Long Island, then played college baseball for and graduated from Iona College. In 1975, his first full year with the Royals, he achieved a 15-7 record.

Leonard later recorded three 20-win seasons, to become the only pitcher in Royals history to do it.[1] Besides, he started nine post-season games for the Royals between 1976 and 1981, ending with a record of 3-5, including a 1-1 record in the 1980 World Series against the Philadelphia Phillies.[2]

From 1975 to 1981, Leonard won 130 games, the most by any right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball.

Towards the end of his career, Leonard missed most of the remaining seasons due to knee injuries. His final season was in 1986, where he ended up with an 8-13 record.[3] Besides his rookie season of 1974, this was the only time he had a losing record. At the end of the 1986 season he retired as a player.

Leonard finished his career leading the Royals all-time list in complete games (103) and shutouts (23) and he was second in wins (144). He also held the club's single-season bests in starts (40), complete games (21) and innings pitched (294.2) and strikeouts (244).

Dennis Leonard
Dennis Leonard - Kansas City Royals
Pitcher
Born: May 8, 1951 (age 67)
Brooklyn, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 4, 1974, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
September 27, 1986, for the Kansas City Royals
MLB statistics
Win–loss record144–106
Earned run average3.70
Strikeouts1,323
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Dennis Leonard Q&A: Righty a long-time participant in Royals caravan. The Topeka Capital-Journal. Article posted on January 13, 2013.
  2. ^ Baseball Reference
  3. ^ "Briefs". Spokane Chronicle. 24 December 1986. p. C2. Retrieved 7 July 2010.

External links

1976 Kansas City Royals season

The 1976 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 90 wins and 72 losses. They lost in the 1976 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, three games to two.

1977 American League Championship Series

The 1977 American League Championship Series was a five-game series played between October 5 and 9, 1977, at Yankee Stadium (Games 1–2), and Royals Stadium (3–5). The Yankees took the series 3–2, and would later go on to beat the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1977 World Series to take the title. Kansas City was given home-field advantage as it rotated back to the West Division; the Royals held a 102–60 record to the Yankees' 100–62 record.

1977 Kansas City Royals season

The 1977 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 102 wins and 60 losses. They went on to lose the 1977 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, 3 games to 2.

1978 American League Championship Series

The 1978 American League Championship Series was held between the New York Yankees and the Kansas City Royals for the third consecutive year.

1978 Kansas City Royals season

The 1978 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing first in the American League West with a record of 92 wins and 70 losses. The team went on to lose in the 1978 American League Championship Series to the New York Yankees, 3 games to 1.

1980 American League Championship Series

The 1980 American League Championship Series featured the Kansas City Royals facing the team that had defeated them three straight years in the ALCS from 1976–78, the New York Yankees.

1980 Kansas City Royals season

The 1980 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. The Royals finished first in the American League West with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They went on to sweep the New York Yankees in the ALCS, then lost to the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1980 World Series, four games to two.

One of the highlights of the season was George Brett winning the American League batting title. Brett's .390 batting average was the highest in the majors since Ted Williams hit .406 in 1941.

1980 World Series

The 1980 World Series was the 77th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1980 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it matched the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies against the American League (AL) champion Kansas City Royals. The Phillies defeated the Royals four games to two to capture the club's first World Series championship in franchise history. Phillies third baseman Mike Schmidt was named as the World Series MVP. The series concluded with Game 6, which ended with Tug McGraw striking out Willie Wilson at 11:29 pm on October 21, 1980. Wilson set a World Series record by striking out twelve times (after getting 230 hits in the regular season) in the six-game set.

Game 6 is also significant because it stands as the "most-watched game in World Series history" with a television audience of 54.9 million viewers.The Kansas City Royals became the second expansion team, and the first American League expansion team, to appear in the World Series. The AL would have to wait until 1985 before one of their expansion teams—the Royals themselves—would win a World Series.

This was the first World Series played entirely on artificial turf. This was also the first World Series since 1920, and the last to date, in which neither team had won a World Series before, making the only remaining possible such combination a competition between the AL's Seattle Mariners and the NL's Washington Nationals. With their victory, the Phillies became the final team out of the original sixteen MLB teams to win a World Series. However, a Philadelphia team had won a World Series before, the last being the Philadelphia Athletics in 1930, exactly a half-century before this Series; in a twist of fate, the Athletics would play thirteen years in Kansas City before eventually settling in Oakland.

1986 Kansas City Royals season

The 1986 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses.

Dave Goltz

David Allan "Dave" Goltz (born June 23, 1949), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the Major Leagues from 1972 to 1983.

Goltz served in the United States Army during the Vietnam War as a helicopter mechanic.In 1977, Goltz won a career-high 20 games for the Twins and tied with Dennis Leonard and Jim Palmer for most wins in the American League.

Goltz appeared in the 1981 World Series as a member of the Dodgers.

Dennis Jackson

Dennis Leonard Jackson (8 March 1932 – 20 March 2014) was an English professional footballer who played as a full back.

Dennis Leonard (disambiguation)

Dennis Leonard (born 1951) is an American baseball player.

Den(n)is Leonard may also refer to:

Dennis Leonard (sound editor), sound editor

Denis Leonard of Westmeath County Council

Dennis Leonard, engineer on Dead Set (album)

Dennis Leonard, of KWGN-TV

Dennis Leonard (sound editor)

Dennis Leonard is a sound editor. He was nominated at the 77th Academy Awards for the film The Polar Express in the category of Best Sound Editing. His nomination was shared with Randy Thom.

Dennis Lundy

Dennis Leonard Lundy (born July 6, 1972) is a former American football running back who played one season in the National Football League with the Houston Oilers and Chicago Bears. He played college football at Northwestern University and attended George D. Chamberlain High School in Tampa, Florida. He was sentenced to one month in prison and two years probation on May 5, 1999 for lying to a federal grand jury investigating gambling by Northwestern athletes. Lundy admitted that he gambled on five games, while also deliberately fumbling the ball on the 1-yard line in a 1994 game against Iowa. He testified that the fumble was designed to win a $400 bet that the Wildcats wouldn't cover the point spread.

Leonard Dennis

Leonard Dennis may refer to:

Leonard G. Dennis (died 1885), political figure

Lennie Dennis (born 1964), Jamaican footballer

List of Kansas City Royals Opening Day starting pitchers

The Kansas City Royals are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Kansas City, Missouri. They play in the American League Central division. The first game of the new baseball season for a team is played on Opening Day, and being named the Opening Day starter is an honor, which is often given to the player who is expected to lead the pitching staff that season, though there are various strategic reasons why a team's best pitcher might not start on Opening Day. The Kansas City Royals have used 23 different Opening Day starting pitchers in their 48 seasons. The 23 starters have a combined Opening Day record of 13 wins, 20 losses and 15 no decisions. No decisions are only awarded to the starting pitcher if the game is won or lost after the starting pitcher has left the game.

The Kansas City Royals began to play in 1969. Wally Bunker was the Royals’ first Opening Day starting pitcher on April 8, 1969 against the Minnesota Twins. The Royals have played in two home ball parks. They played in Municipal Stadium from 1969 through 1972. They played three Opening Day games at Municipal Stadium, winning twice and losing once. The Royals’ starting pitchers received no decisions in both of the wins, leaving their record in Opening Day starts at Municipal Stadium no wins, one loss and two no decisions. They moved to Royals Stadium, which was subsequently renamed Kauffman Stadium, 1973. They have played 20 Opening Day games there, and their starting pitchers have eight wins and eight losses with four no decisions. This makes their record at home in Opening Day games eight wins and nine losses with six no decisions. In Opening Day games on the road, their starting pitchers have a record of four wins and eleven losses with eight no decisions.Kevin Appier has most Opening Day starts for the Royals, with seven, including six in a row from 1992 to 1997. He has a record of 1–4 with two no decisions in those starts. The other Royal pitchers who have made at least three Opening Day starts are Dennis Leonard with four, and Paul Splittorff, Bud Black, Bret Saberhagen, Jeff Suppan and Gil Meche with three apiece. Bunker, Dick Drago, Steve Busby, Larry Gura and James Shields have each made two Opening Day starts for the Royals.Black, who has two wins as an Opening Day starting pitcher, is the only Royals pitcher who has won more than one Opening Day start. Black had a record in Opening Day starts of 2–1. Only two Royals pitchers had more than one loss in Opening Day starts, Kevin Appier with four losses and Dennis Leonard with three.The Royals played in the World Series in 1980, 1985, 2014 and 2015, winning in 1985 and 2015. Leonard, Black, Shields and Ventura were the Opening Day starting pitchers in 1980, 1985, 2014 and 2015 respectively, when the Royals played in the World Series, and they had a combined Opening Day record of 2–1 with one no decision.

Move Me Brightly

Move Me Brightly is a music documentary film. It contains live performances of Grateful Dead songs from a 2012 concert by Bob Weir and a number of other musicians, called "Move Me Brightly: Celebrating Jerry Garcia's 70th Birthday". The film also includes interviews with some of the performers, other musicians, and members of the Grateful Dead extended family. It was released on DVD and Blu-ray in 2013.Move Me Brightly was directed by Justin Kreutzmann, the son of Grateful Dead drummer Bill Kreutzmann. Many of the interviews were conducted by Luke Wilson. The music was produced and mixed by Rick Vargas, with live mixing by Dennis Leonard and audio mastering by David Glasser. The liner notes for the video were written by Mike Campbell, Benjy Eisen, and David Crosby.

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