Dennis Awtrey

Dennis Wade Awtrey (born February 22, 1948)[1] is a retired American professional basketball player. A 6'10" center from Santa Clara University, Awtrey was drafted by the NBA's Philadelphia 76ers in 1970. He played in the league for twelve seasons, spending time with the 76ers, Chicago Bulls, Phoenix Suns, Boston Celtics, Seattle SuperSonics, and Portland Trail Blazers. Awtrey had his finest season in 1974-1975, when he averaged 9.9 points and 8.6 rebounds as a member of the Suns.[2] Awtrey was also known for once having punched Kareem Abdul-Jabbar in the jaw.[3][4] In 2012, Awtrey moved to Manzanita, Oregon, where he now operates a bed-and-breakfast.[5]

Dennis Awtrey
Personal information
BornFebruary 22, 1948 (age 70)
Hollywood, California
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
Listed weight235 lb (107 kg)
Career information
High schoolBlackford (San Jose, California)
CollegeSanta Clara (1967–1970)
NBA draft1970 / Round: 3 / Pick: 46th overall
Selected by the Philadelphia 76ers
Playing career1970–1982
PositionCenter
Number20, 21, 34
Career history
19701972Philadelphia 76ers
19721974Chicago Bulls
19741978Phoenix Suns
1978–1979Boston Celtics
1979Seattle SuperSonics
1979–1980Chicago Bulls
1980–1981Seattle SuperSonics
1981–1982Portland Trail Blazers
Career highlights and awards
Career statistics
Points3,516 (4.8 ppg)
Rebounds3,342 (4.6 rpg)
Assists1,467 (2.8 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

References

  1. ^ "Alumni Profile". National Basketball Retired Players Association.
  2. ^ "1974-75 Phoenix Suns". Land of Basketball.
  3. ^ United Press International (May 4, 1986). "Team Called Sunderella Recalled: A Decade Ago They Gave Celtics a Scare in NBA Final". Los Angeles Times.
  4. ^ Nidetz, Steve (April 29, 1993). "Nba Fighting Mad Again-or Maybe It's All Those Tv Replays". Chicago Tribune.
  5. ^ Schoenfeld, Bruce (June–July 2014). "In Praise of the American Beach Town". National Geographic Traveller.

External links

1968 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1968 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1970 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1970 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of four major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Associated Press, the USBWA, The United Press International and the National Association of Basketball Coaches.

1970–71 Indiana Pacers season

The 1970–71 Indiana Pacers season was Indiana's 4th season in the American Basketball Association and 4th as a team.

1974 NBA Expansion draft

The 1974 NBA Expansion Draft was the sixth expansion draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on May 20, 1974, so that the newly founded New Orleans Jazz could acquire players for the upcoming 1974–75 season. New Orleans had been awarded the expansion team on March 7, 1974. The Jazz moved to Salt Lake City in 1979 and are currently known as the Utah Jazz. In an NBA expansion draft, new NBA teams are allowed to acquire players from the previously established teams in the league. Not all players on a given team are available during an expansion draft, since each team can protect a certain number of players from being selected. In this draft, each of the seventeen other NBA teams had protected seven players from their roster and the Jazz selected seventeen unprotected players, one from each team.The Jazz were formed and owned by a group headed by Fred Rosenfeld and Sam Battistone. Former college basketball coach Scotty Robertson was hired as the franchise's first head coach and 11-time All-Star Elgin Baylor was named as one of the assistant coach. The Jazz's selections included five-time All-Star Walt Bellamy, three-time All-Star Bob Kauffman and one-time All-Star John Block. However, none of them had long careers with the Jazz; Bellamy, who was 35 years old, was waived after one game and both Kauffman and Block were traded. Prior to the draft, the Jazz made a trade with the Atlanta Hawks which brought two-time All-Star Pete Maravich to the Jazz. In exchange for Maravich, the Jazz sent the first guard and forward chosen in the expansion draft, which turned out to be Bob Kauffman and Dean Meminger, along with future draft picks to the Hawks. Ten players from the expansion draft joined the Jazz for their inaugural season, but only three played more than one season for the team.

1974–75 Phoenix Suns season

The 1974–75 Phoenix Suns season was the seventh season for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association. The Suns' roster averaged 2.8 years of professional experience, and included four one-year players in addition to three rookies. Coming off a 30–52 season, the Suns only improved by two games, finishing 32–50 under second-year head coach John MacLeod. All home games were played at Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum.

Coming off an All-Star season, guard/forward Charlie Scott led the Suns in both points and assists with averages of 24.3 and 4.5 a game. For Scott, it was the third and final NBA All-Star Game selection of his career. 31-year-old Dick Van Arsdale, the only player remaining from the Suns' inaugural season roster, was second in scoring with a 16.1 average. Fourth-year forward Curtis Perry enjoyed his first season with Phoenix, posting career-highs in both points and rebounds, averaging 13.4 points and a team-high 11.9 rebounds per game.

1975–76 Phoenix Suns season

The 1975–76 Phoenix Suns season was the eighth season for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association. The season included an improbable run to the NBA Finals by a team that had never won a playoff series and made the playoffs only one other season in the franchise's existence. With a regular season record of 42–40, the Suns had finished third in the Pacific division standings and improved upon last season's win total by 10 games. The ensuing playoff run took plenty by surprise, including a seven-game series win against the Western Conference's top seed Golden State Warriors, a team that had finished 17 games ahead of the Suns in the divisional standings. The franchise's first Finals appearance pitted them against a 12-time champion in the Boston Celtics, whose roster featured three players from that season's All-Star Game. The 1976 NBA Finals would feature a memorable Game 5 triple-overtime thriller filled with controversies in which the Suns narrowly lost. Returning home for Game 6, the demoralized Suns would lose Game 6 and the series but not before endearing a generation of fans to the Suns franchise and showcasing a basketball from the desert southwest. The team's "Cinderella" season earned them the nickname Sunderella Suns. John MacLeod was head coach and the Suns played their home games at Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum.

1977–78 Phoenix Suns season

The 1977–78 Phoenix Suns season was the tenth season for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association. The team finished second in a Pacific division that did not have a team finish below .500, as the Suns returned to the playoffs for the third time in franchise history. The Suns were led by head coach John MacLeod and played all home games in Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum.

Both Paul Westphal and Walter Davis, a rookie from the University of North Carolina, were selected to participate in the All-Star Game and by the end of the season, both were members of the All-NBA Second Team. Davis became the second Sun in three years to be selected as Rookie of the Year, an award teammate Alvan Adams had collected after the 1975–76 season.

Both Westphal and rookie Davis averaged career-highs in scoring, averaging 25.2 and 24.2 points a game. The combined averaged of 49.4 points made for the league's highest-scoring duo on the season. Additionally, Westphal and Davis broke a franchise record of 45.9 points a game, a mark set by Connie Hawkins and Dick Van Arsdale during the 1969–70 season.

1979 NBA draft

The 1979 NBA draft was the 33rd annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on June 25, 1979, before the 1979–80 season. In this draft, 22 NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The first two picks in the draft belonged to the teams that finished last in each conference, with the order determined by a coin flip. The Los Angeles Lakers, who obtained the New Orleans Jazz' first-round pick in a trade, won the coin flip and were awarded the first overall pick, while the Chicago Bulls were awarded the second pick. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was eligible for selection. If a player left college early, he would not be eligible for selection until his college class graduated. Larry Bird would have been eligible to join this draft class because his "junior eligible" draft status from being taken by Boston in 1978 would expire the minute the 1979 draft began, but Bird and the Celtics agreed on a 5-year contract in time to avoid that. Before the draft, five college underclassmen were declared eligible for selection under the "hardship" rule. These players had applied and gave evidence of financial hardship to the league, which granted them the right to start earning their living by starting their professional careers earlier. Prior to the draft, the Jazz relocated from New Orleans to Salt Lake City and became the Utah Jazz. The draft consisted of 10 rounds comprising the selection of 202 players.

1980–81 Seattle SuperSonics season

The 1980–81 NBA season was the SuperSonics 14th season in the NBA.

1981 NBA draft

The 1981 NBA draft was the 35th annual draft of the National Basketball Association (NBA). The draft was held on June 9, 1981, before the 1981–82 season. The draft was broadcast in the United States on the USA Network. In this draft, 23 NBA teams took turns selecting amateur U.S. college basketball players and other eligible players, including international players. The first two picks in the draft belonged to the teams that finished last in each conference, with the order determined by a coin flip. The Dallas Mavericks won the coin flip and were awarded the first overall pick, while the Detroit Pistons were awarded the second pick. The remaining first-round picks and the subsequent rounds were assigned to teams in reverse order of their win–loss record in the previous season. A player who had finished his four-year college eligibility was automatically eligible for selection. Before the draft, five college underclassmen announced that they would leave college early and would be eligible for selection. The draft consisted of 10 rounds comprising the selection of 223 players.

The Dallas Mavericks used their first pick to draft 1980 Naismith College Player of the Year Mark Aguirre from DePaul University. Aguirre, who had just finished his junior season in college, became the second underclassman to be drafted first overall, after Magic Johnson in 1979. The Detroit Pistons used the second overall pick to draft Isiah Thomas, a sophomore guard from Indiana University. Thomas had just won the 1981 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Championship with Indiana and was named as the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. The New Jersey Nets used the third pick to draft another underclassman, Buck Williams, from the University of Maryland. Williams went on to win the Rookie of the Year Award and was also selected to the All-Star Game in his rookie season. This draft marked the first time that the first three selections were college underclassmen. Danny Ainge, the 1981 Wooden College Player of the Year, was selected in the second round with the 31st pick by the Boston Celtics. Ainge had been playing professional baseball since 1979 with the Toronto Blue Jays in the Major League Baseball (MLB) while also playing college basketball at Brigham Young University. He reportedly preferred to continue his baseball career, but the Celtics successfully persuaded him to play basketball instead. He is one of only twelve athletes who have played in both the NBA and MLB.

California Mr. Basketball

Each year the California Mr. Basketball award is given to the person chosen as the best high school boys basketball player in the U.S. state of California. Many have gone on to play in the NBA.

Voting is done in a points system. Each voter selects first, second, and third place votes. A player receives five points for each first-place vote, three points for each second-place vote, and one point for a third-place vote. The player who garners the most points receives the award. The California Mr. Basketball award is the second oldest such award in the nation; only Indiana Mr. Basketball, which was first awarded in 1939, predates it.

List of National Basketball Association players (A)

This is a list of National Basketball Association players whose last names begin with A.

The list also includes players from the American National Basketball League (NBL), the Basketball Association of America (BAA), and the original American Basketball Association (ABA). All of these leagues contributed to the formation of the present-day NBA.

Individuals who played in the NBL prior to its 1949 merger with the BAA are listed in italics, as they are not traditionally listed in the NBA's official player registers.

Manzanita, Oregon

Manzanita is a coastal city in Tillamook County, Oregon, United States. It is located on U.S. Route 101 about 25 miles (40 km) south of Seaside and 25 miles (40 km) north of Tillamook. The population was 598 at the 2010 census.

Nate Thurmond

Nathaniel Thurmond (July 25, 1941 – July 16, 2016) was an American basketball player who spent the majority of his 14-year career in the National Basketball Association (NBA) with the Golden State Warriors. He played the center and power forward positions. Thurmond was a seven-time All-Star and the first player in NBA history to record an official quadruple-double. In 1965, he grabbed 42 rebounds in a game; only Wilt Chamberlain and Bill Russell recorded more rebounds in an NBA game. Thurmond was named both a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History.Known to fans as "Nate the Great", Thurmond has had his No. 42 jersey retired by both the Golden State Warriors and the Cleveland Cavaliers.

Oklahoma City Thunder all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who played in at least in one game for the Seattle SuperSonics (1967–2008) or Oklahoma City Thunder (2008–present) National Basketball Association (NBA) franchise.

Philadelphia 76ers all-time roster

The following is a list of players, both past and current, who appeared at least in one game for the Philadelphia 76ers NBA franchise.

Players in bold denote current players on the 76ers' roster.

Last updated through July 30, 2018.

Santa Clara Broncos men's basketball

The Santa Clara Broncos men's basketball team represents Santa Clara University in NCAA Division I basketball competition. The team plays home games at the Leavey Center in Santa Clara, California and have been members of the West Coast Conference since its formation in 1952. The team is currently coached by Herb Sendek, who had previously been the head coach at NC State and Arizona State. Sendek was hired on March 29, 2016 Santa Clara has a long history of basketball success, having appeared in 11 NCAA Tournaments and 4 National Invitational Tournaments and producing a number of both collegiate All-Americans and NBA players. Recently, The 2010–11 team won the 2011 CollegeInsider.com Tournament and the 2012–13 team won the 2013 College Basketball Invitational. They are currently the only team to have won a CBI and a CIT.

West Coast Conference

The West Coast Conference (WCC) is a collegiate athletic conference affiliated in NCAA Division I consisting of ten member schools across the states of California, Oregon, Utah and Washington.

All of the current members are private, faith-based institutions. Seven members are Catholic Church affiliates, with four of these schools being Jesuit institutions. Pepperdine is an affiliate of the Churches of Christ. Brigham Young University is an affiliate of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS). The conference's newest member, the University of the Pacific (which re-joined in 2013 after a 42-year absence), is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, although it has been financially independent of the church since 1969.

West Coast Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

The West Coast Conference (WCC) Men's Basketball Player of the Year is a basketball award given to the most outstanding men's basketball player in the West Coast Conference. The award was first given following the conference's inaugural 1952–53 season, when it was known as the California Basketball Association. The only season in which the award was not presented was the conference's second season of 1953–54. There have been four ties in the award's history, most recently in 2006–07 between Sean Denison of Santa Clara and Derek Raivio of Gonzaga. There have also been 13 repeat winners, but only one—Bill Cartwright of San Francisco—has been Player of the Year three times.

Four schools in the West Coast Conference have dominated the total awards distribution. Before 2000, Pepperdine, San Francisco and Santa Clara had earned the bulk of the awards. Since then, Gonzaga has claimed a near-monopoly on it. In the 16 seasons from 2000–01 to the present, coinciding with the Bulldogs' rise to national prominence, Gonzaga players have won the award outright 11 times and shared the award once. Gonzaga now claims the most winners with 15, while each of the three other schools are tied for the second most with 11 winners apiece. The next closest school, Saint Mary's, has eight. One current member has yet to have a winner (Portland).

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