Demographics of Edmonton

According to the 2011 census, the City of Edmonton had a population of 812,201 residents, compared to 3,645,257 for all of Alberta, Canada.[24] The total population of the Edmonton census metropolitan area (CMA) was 1,159,869, making it the sixth-largest CMA in Canada,[25] while Statistics Canada estimated the CMA's 2011 population to be 1,196,342.[26] In 2014, a municipal census indicated the city had a population of 877,926.[27]

Federal census
population history
YearPop.±%
19012,626—    
190611,167+325.2%
191124,900+123.0%
191653,846+116.2%
192158,821+9.2%
192665,163+10.8%
193179,197+21.5%
193685,774+8.3%
194193,817+9.4%
1946113,116+20.6%
1951159,631+41.1%
1956226,002+41.6%
1961281,027+24.3%
1966376,925+34.1%
1971438,152+16.2%
1976461,361+5.3%
1981532,246+15.4%
1986573,982+7.8%
1991616,741+7.4%
1996616,306−0.1%
2001666,104+8.1%
2006730,372+9.6%
2011812,201+11.2%
2016932,546+14.8%
Source: Statistics Canada
[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]
[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23]

Growth and density

In the five years between 2006 and 2011, the population of the City of Edmonton grew by 11.2%, compared with an increase of 12.1% for the Edmonton CMA and 10.8% for Alberta as a whole. The population density of the City of Edmonton averaged 1,186.8 km2 (458.2 sq mi), compared with an average of 5.7 km2 (2.2 sq mi) for Alberta altogether.[24]

Age and gender

In mid-2006, 11.9% of Edmonton's population were of retirement age (65 and over for males and females) compared with 13.7% in Canada.[28] The median age was 35.3 years of age, compared to 37.6 years of age for all of Canada. Also, according to the 2006 census, 50.5% of the population within the City of Edmonton were female, while 49.5% were male. Children under five accounted for approximately 5.6% of the resident population of Edmonton. This compares with 6.2% in Alberta, and almost 5.2% for Canada overall.[28]

Ethnic origin

In 2016, people of Canadian origin make up the largest ethnic cluster in Edmonton.[29] Since 2011, visible minorities accounted for over 30% of the population, while more than 5% of Edmontonians were considered Aboriginal.

Population by ethnicity, 2016
Ethnic origin[30] Population Percent
Canadian 159,070 17.41%
English 153,740 16.83%
Scottish 126,100 13.80%
German 124,170 13.59%
Irish 113,795 12.46%
Ukrainian 98,820 10.82%
French 85,565 9.37%
Chinese 67,970 7.44%
East Indian 67,935 7.44%
Filipino 57,050 6.24%

Ethnic breakdown of Edmonton (2016)

  European (56.5%)
  South Asian (9.5%)
  Chinese (6.3%)
  Filipino (5.9%)
  Black (5.9%)
  Southeast Asian (1.8%)
  Latin American (1.9%)
  Arab (2.6%)
  Other (3.2%)
  Indigenous (6.4%)

Visible minorities and Aboriginals

Visible minority and Aboriginal population[31][32][33][34]
Population group Population (2016) % of total population (2016) Population (2011) % of total population (2011) Population (2006) % of total population (2006)
European 524,270 57.4% 514,935 64.7% 518,625 71.8%
Visible minority group South Asian 86,550 9.5% 57,500 7.2% 38,225 5.3%
Chinese 57,715 6.3% 49,660 6.2% 45,305 6.3%
Black 54,285 5.9% 30,355 3.8% 19,020 2.6%
Filipino 53,980 5.9% 36,565 4.6% 18,245 2.5%
Latin American 16,980 1.9% 13,330 1.7% 8,650 1.2%
Arab 23,970 2.6% 13,800 1.7% 11,205 1.6%
Southeast Asian 16,305 1.8% 15,480 1.9% 10,635 1.5%
West Asian 6,390 0.7% 6,610 0.8% 2,690 0.4%
Korean 7,025 0.8% 4,565 0.6% 3,440 0.5%
Japanese 1,940 0.2% 2,080 0.3% 1,845 0.3%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 3,655 0.4% 2,150 0.3% 1,255 0.2%
Multiple visible minorities 10,255 1.1% 6,665 0.8% 4,940 0.7%
Total visible minority population 339,035 37.1% 238,755 30% 165,465 22.9%
Aboriginal group First Nations 22,840 2.5% 18,860 2.4% 15,980 2.2%
Métis 25,440 2.8% 21,160 2.7% 20,690 2.9%
Inuit 715 0.1% 695 0.1% 495 0.1%
Aboriginal, n.i.e. 515 0.1% 540 0.1% 625 0.1%
Multiple Aboriginal identities 765 0.1% 735 0.1% 375 0.1%
Total Aboriginal population 50,280 5.5% 41,985 5.3% 38,170 5.3%
Total population 913,525 100% 795,675 100% 722,260 100%

Religion

The 2011 National Household Survey identified 55.8% of Edmontonians as Christian, while 31.1% of residents were identified as having no religion.[35]

Religion in Edmonton (2011)

  No Religion (31.1%)
  Christian (55.8%)
  Muslim (5.5%)
  Sikh (2.5%)
  Buddhist (2.1%)
  Hindu (1.9%)
  Jewish (0.4%)
  Other (0.6%)
  Indigenous Spirituality (0.2%)
Religion (2011) 1 Denomination Congregation Proportion 2
Christian 444,560 55.8%
Catholic 206,030 25.9%
United Church 39,405 5.0%
Anglican Church 23,935 3.0%
Lutheran 20,720 2.6%
Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox 19,200 2.4%
Baptist 15,150 1.9%
Pentecostal 14,360 1.8%
Presbyterian 5,955 0.7%
Other Christian 99,775 12.5%
Muslim 43,865 5.5%
Sikh 19,555 2.5%
Buddhist 16,840 2.1%
Hindu 14,865 1.9%
Jewish 3,445 0.4%
Other Religions 4,435 0.6%
Aboriginal spirituality 1,240 0.2%
No religious affiliation 247,150 31.1%
Total 795,675 100%
^1 Statistics Canada. 2013. Alberta (Code 48) (table). National Household Survey (NHS) Profile. 2011 National Household Survey. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 99-004-XWE. Ottawa. Released September 11, 2013. [35]
^2 All percentages are rounded to nearest 0.1%.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Table IX: Population of cities, towns and incorporated villages in 1906 and 1901 as classed in 1906". Census of the Northwest Provinces, 1906. Sessional Paper No. 17a. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1907. p. 100.
  2. ^ "Table I: Area and Population of Canada by Provinces, Districts and Subdistricts in 1911 and Population in 1901". Census of Canada, 1911. Volume I. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1912. pp. 2–39.
  3. ^ "Table I: Population of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta by Districts, Townships, Cities, Towns, and Incorporated Villages in 1916, 1911, 1906, and 1901". Census of Prairie Provinces, 1916. Population and Agriculture. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1918. pp. 77–140.
  4. ^ "Table 8: Population by districts and sub-districts according to the Redistribution Act of 1914 and the amending act of 1915, compared for the census years 1921, 1911 and 1901". Census of Canada, 1921. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1922. pp. 169–215.
  5. ^ "Table 7: Population of cities, towns and villages for the province of Alberta in census years 1901–26, as classed in 1926". Census of Prairie Provinces, 1926. Census of Alberta, 1926. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1927. pp. 565–567.
  6. ^ "Table 12: Population of Canada by provinces, counties or census divisions and subdivisions, 1871–1931". Census of Canada, 1931. Ottawa: Government of Canada. 1932. pp. 98–102.
  7. ^ "Table 4: Population in incorporated cities, towns and villages, 1901–1936". Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1936. Volume I: Population and Agriculture. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1938. pp. 833–836.
  8. ^ "Table 10: Population by census subdivisions, 1871–1941". Eighth Census of Canada, 1941. Volume II: Population by Local Subdivisions. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1944. pp. 134–141.
  9. ^ "Table 6: Population by census subdivisions, 1926–1946". Census of the Prairie Provinces, 1946. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1949. pp. 401–414.
  10. ^ "Table 6: Population by census subdivisions, 1871–1951". Ninth Census of Canada, 1951. Volume I: Population, General Characteristics. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1953. p. 6.73–6.83.
  11. ^ "Table 6: Population by sex, for census subdivisions, 1956 and 1951". Census of Canada, 1956. Population, Counties and Subdivisions. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1957. p. 6.50–6.53.
  12. ^ "Table 6: Population by census subdivisions, 1901–1961". 1961 Census of Canada. Series 1.1: Historical, 1901–1961. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1963. p. 6.77–6.83.
  13. ^ "Population by specified age groups and sex, for census subdivisions, 1966". Census of Canada, 1966. Population, Specified Age Groups and Sex for Counties and Census Subdivisions, 1966. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1968. p. 6.50–6.53.
  14. ^ "Table 2: Population of Census Subdivisions, 1921–1971". 1971 Census of Canada. Volume I: Population, Census Subdivisions (Historical). Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1973. p. 2.102–2.111.
  15. ^ "Table 3: Population for census divisions and subdivisions, 1971 and 1976". 1976 Census of Canada. Census Divisions and Subdivisions, Western Provinces and the Territories. Volume I: Population, Geographic Distributions. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1977. p. 3.40–3.43.
  16. ^ "Table 4: Population and Total Occupied Dwellings, for Census Divisions and Subdivisions, 1976 and 1981". 1981 Census of Canada. Volume II: Provincial series, Population, Geographic distributions (Alberta). Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1982. p. 4.1–4.10. ISBN 0-660-51095-2.
  17. ^ "Table 2: Census Divisions and Subdivisions – Population and Occupied Private Dwellings, 1981 and 1986". Census Canada 1986. Population and Dwelling Counts – Provinces and Territories (Alberta). Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1987. p. 2.1–2.10. ISBN 0-660-53463-0.
  18. ^ "Table 2: Population and Dwelling Counts, for Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions, 1986 and 1991 – 100% Data". 91 Census. Population and Dwelling Counts – Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1992. pp. 100–108. ISBN 0-660-57115-3.
  19. ^ "Table 10: Population and Dwelling Counts, for Census Divisions, Census Subdivisions (Municipalities) and Designated Places, 1991 and 1996 Censuses – 100% Data". 96 Census. A National Overview – Population and Dwelling Counts. Ottawa: Statistics Canada. 1997. pp. 136–146. ISBN 0-660-59283-5.
  20. ^ "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Divisions, 2001 and 1996 Censuses – 100% Data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  21. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. January 6, 2010. Retrieved April 1, 2012.
  22. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2012. Retrieved February 8, 2012.
  23. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2016 and 2011 censuses – 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. February 8, 2017. Retrieved February 8, 2017.
  24. ^ a b "Census Profile". Stasistics Canada. Retrieved 23 October 2012.
  25. ^ "Census Profile". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 23 October 2012.
  26. ^ "Annual Demographic Estimates: Subprovincial Areas, 2006 to 2011" (PDF). Statistics Canada. March 2012. Retrieved 2012-11-14.
  27. ^ "2014 Municipal Census". City of Edmonton. Retrieved 2014-09-09.
  28. ^ a b "2006 Community Profiles – Edmonton, Alberta (City)". Statistics Canada. 2010-12-06. Retrieved 2011-08-15.
  29. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census, Ethnic Origin, Edmonton, Alberta".
  30. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census, Ethnic Origin, Edmonton, Alberta".
  31. ^ [1], Aboriginal Population Profile from the 2006 Census, Statistics Canada - Census Subdivision
  32. ^ [2], Community Profiles from the 2006 Census, Statistics Canada - Census Subdivision
  33. ^ [3], National Household Survey (NHS) Profile, 2011
  34. ^ "Census Profile, 2016 Census: Edmonton, City [Census subdivision], Alberta and Division No. 11, Census division [Census division], Alberta – Visible minority". Statistics Canada. April 24, 2018. Retrieved January 6, 2019.
  35. ^ a b "NHS Profile, 2011". Statistics Canada. Government of Canada. Retrieved 2 June 2016.

External links

Demographics of Alberta

Alberta has experienced a relatively high rate of growth in recent years, due in large part to its economy. Between 2003 and 2004, the province saw high birthrates (on par with some larger provinces such as British Columbia), relatively high immigration, and a high rate of interprovincial migration when compared to other provinces. Approximately 81% of the population live in urban areas and only about 19% live in rural areas. The Calgary–Edmonton Corridor is the most urbanized area in Alberta and is one of Canada's four most urban regions. Many of Alberta's cities and towns have also experienced high rates of growth in recent history. From a population of 73,022 in 1901, Alberta has grown to 3,645,257 in 2011 and in the process has gone from less than 1.5% of Canada's population to 10.9%. As of July 1, 2018, Alberta's population represented 11.6% of Canada's total population of 37,058,856 making it the fourth most populated province in Canada. According to the 2018 third quarter report, Alberta's population increased by 23,096 to 4,330,206, the largest increase since the 2014 economic downturn.

Demographics of Calgary

In the 2011 Census, the City of Calgary had a population of 1,096,833 residents, representing 30% of the 3,645,257 residents in all of Alberta, and 3% compared to a population of 33,476,688 in all of Canada. The total population of the Calgary census metropolitan area (CMA) was 1,214,839. Calgary is the largest city in Alberta, and the third-largest municipality and fourth-largest metropolitan area in Canada, as of 2016.

Outline of Alberta

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Alberta:

Alberta – province of Canada. It had a population of 3,645,257 in 2011, making it the most populous of Canada's three prairie provinces. Alberta and its neighbour, Saskatchewan, were established as provinces on September 1, 1905. Alberta is located in western Canada, bounded by the provinces of British Columbia to the west and Saskatchewan to the east, the Northwest Territories to the north, and the U.S. state of Montana to the south. Alberta is one of three Canadian provinces and territories to border only a single U.S. state and is also one of only two provinces that are landlocked.

Religion in Edmonton

Religion in Edmonton consists of the diverse religious traditions of the people who live in Edmonton, the capital of Alberta.

As of the 2011 National Household Survey, 55.8% of Edmonton residents identified themselves as Christian with 25.9% of the total being Catholic. 12.5% belong to other Christian denominations, 5.5% are Muslim, 2.6% are Sikh, 2.1% are Buddhist, and 31.1% have no religious affiliation. One of Alberta's three Bahá'í Centres is located in Edmonton; the other two centres are situated in Sylvan Lake, Alberta and Athabasca, Alberta. The first mosque established in Canada-the Al-Rashid Mosque, founded by Abdullah Yusuf Ali—is situated in Edmonton. Edmonton has an Ahmadiyya mosque, named Baitul Hadi Mosque. Edmonton also hosts a Maronite Catholic church, on 76th Avenue/98th Street, with services in English on Saturdays and Arabic on Sundays. The Lebanese community also has a Druze Community Centre on the north side of the city. The Edmonton Alberta Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was dedicated on December 11, 1999. The Hindu Community in Edmonton is served by the Hindu Society of Alberta (North Indian Temple) and the Maha Ganapathy Society of Alberta (South Indian Temple). The Sikh community in Edmonton is served by four Gurudawaras. The Jewish Community in Edmonton is served by Jewish Federation of Edmonton. The region is served by five synagogues. Edmonton is also home to two of Alberta's four Unitarian Universalist congregations—the Unitarian Church of Edmonton and the Westwood Unitarian Congregation; the other two are located in Calgary and Lethbridge.

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