Dell Publishing

Dell Publishing, an American publisher of books, magazines and comic books, was founded in 1921 by George T. Delacorte Jr. with $10,000, two employees and one magazine title, I Confess, and soon began turning out dozens of pulp magazines, which included penny-a-word detective stories, articles about the movies, and romance books (or "smoochies" as they were known in the slang of the day).

During the 1920s, 1930s and 1940s, Dell was one of the largest publishers of magazines, including pulp magazines. Their line of humor magazines included 1000 Jokes, launched in 1938. From 1929 to 1974, they published comics under the Dell Comics line, the bulk of which (1938–68) was done in partnership with Western Publishing. In 1943, Dell entered into paperback book publishing with Dell Paperbacks. They also used the book imprints of Dial Press, Delacorte Books, Delacorte Press, Yearling Books, and Laurel Leaf Library.

Dell Publishing
Parent companyRandom House
Founded1921
FounderGeorge T. Delacorte Jr.
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationNew York City
Publication typesBooks
ImprintsDial, Delacorte, Laurel Leaf, Yearling
Official websitebantam-dell.atrandom.com

Paperbacks

Dell's earliest venture into paperback publishing began because of its close association with Western Publishing. William Lyles wrote, "Dell needed paper, which Western had in 1942, and because Western by this time needed printing work, which Dell could supply in the form of its new paperback line. So Dell Books was born, created by Delacorte of Dell and Lloyd E. Smith of Western."[1]

Dell began publishing paperbacks in 1942 at a time when mass-market paperbacks were a relatively new idea for the United States market—its principal competitor, Pocket Books, had only been publishing since 1939. An examination of paperback books available at this time shows no consensus on standardization of any feature; each early company was attempting to distinguish itself from its competitors. Lyles commented, "Dell achieved more variety than any of its early competitors. It did so, at first, with an instantly identifiable format of vibrant airbrushed covers for its predominantly genre fiction, varying 'eye-in-keyhole' logos, maps on the back covers, lists of the books' characters, and 'tantalizer-pages'. The design was merchandising genius; it successfully attracted buyers, it sold books."[1]

The first four books did not feature maps on the back cover; this began with Dell #5, Four Frightened Women by George Harmon Coxe. (A later re-issue of Dell #4, The American Gun Mystery by Ellery Queen, added a map.) The map was meant as an aid to the reader, to show the location of the principal activity of the novel. Some were incredibly detailed; others somewhat stylized and abstract. The books were almost immediately known as "mapbacks", and that nomenclature has lasted among collectors to this day.[2] The maps were "delicate and detailed".[3]

The novels in the mapback series were primarily mysteries/detective fiction but ran the gamut from romances (Self-Made Woman by Faith Baldwin, #163) to science fiction (The First Men in the Moon by H.G. Wells, #201), war books (I Was A Nazi Flyer by Gottfried Leske, #21 and Eisenhower Was My Boss by Kay Summersby, #286), many Westerns (Gunsmoke and Trail Dust by Bliss Lomax, #271), joke books (Liberty Laughs, Cavanah & Weir, #38) and even crossword puzzles (Second Dell Book of Crossword Puzzles, ed. Kathleen Rafferty, #278, one of the rarest titles today). There were a few movie tie-in editions (The Harvey Girls by Samuel Hopkins Adams, #130, and Rope as by Alfred Hitchcock, #262) and the occasional attempt at more artistic non-genre fiction (To A God Unknown by John Steinbeck, #407). Novels which are today long forgotten, by largely unknown authors (Death Wears A White Gardenia, by Zelda Popkin, #13) are in the same series as valuable original paperback editions of famous authors (A Man Called Spade, by Dashiell Hammett, #90). "The back cover map was very popular with readers and remains popular with collectors... the Dell "mapbacks" are among the most well-known vintage paperbacks."[2]

In the early 1950s, as series numbering reached the 400s, Dell began updating the appearance of its books. In 1951, the back cover maps began to be gradually replaced with conventional text and "blurb" covers.[2] Some later, more stylized maps were the product of Milton Glaser and Push Pin Studios. These innovations were brought in by editor-in-chief Frank Taylor. He introduced classics in paperback form under the umbrella imprint "Laurel Editions" which included Henry James and a poetry series edited by the distinguished poet Richard Wilbur.

Dell Ten Cent Books

At about this time, Dell launched two short-lived experiments which are also considered very collectible, Dell First Editions and Dell Ten Cent Books. The Ten Cent Books, 36 in all, were thin, paperback-sized editions containing a single short story told in only 64 pages (advertised as "too short for popular reprint at a higher price"), such as Robert A. Heinlein's Universe (1951).

Dell First Editions included novels by John D. MacDonald, Fredric Brown, Jim Thompson, Elmore Leonard and Charles Williams.

Comic strip reprints

In 1947, Dell published two unnumbered paperbacks based on newspaper comic strips, Blondie and Dagwood in Footlight Folly and Dick Tracy and the Woo Woo Sisters. Both are popular with collectors today.[2]

Dell was also the publisher between 1982 and 1987 of the series Twilight: Where Darkness Begins.

Dell Publishing no longer exists as an independent entity. They were bought out and are part of the Bantam Dell Publishing Group of Random House, which also uses some of Dell's other imprints. Dell Magazines was sold in 1997, and it still exists as a major publisher of puzzle magazines, also publishing science fiction, mystery and horoscope magazines.

Imprints

  • Dial Press
  • Delacorte Books or Delacorte Press
  • Yearling Books
  • Laurel Leaf Library

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Putting Dell on the Map, William H. Lyles, Greenwood Press, 1983, ISBN 0-313-23667-4
  2. ^ a b c d Collectable Paperback Books, ed. Jeff Canja, Glenmoor Publishing, 2002, ISBN 0-967363-95-0
  3. ^ Hancer's Price Guide to Paperback Books, Third Edition, ed. Kevin Hancer, Wallace-Homestead, 1990, ISBN 0-87069-536-3

External links

A, A Novel

a, A Novel is a 1968 book by the American artist Andy Warhol published by Grove Press. It is a nearly word-for-word transcription of tapes recorded by Warhol and Ondine over a two-year period in 1965–1967.

A Daughter's a Daughter

A Daughter's a Daughter is a novel written by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by Heinemann on 24 November 1952. Initially unpublished in the US, it was later issued as a paperback by Dell Publishing in September 1963. It was the fifth of six novels Christie wrote under the nom-de-plume Mary Westmacott. Initially a play written by Christie in the late 1930s, the plot tells of a daughter's opposition to her mother's plan to remarry.

Christie tried to interest Peter Saunders, later the producer of The Mousetrap, in the play in 1950. He suggested amendments to update some of the references, which were now twenty years old, and tried the play out at the Theatre Royal, Bath where it opened on 9 July 1956 and ran for one week and eight performances. It was billed under the Westmacott name but the true identity of the author slipped out resulting in good attendance figures. Saunders however felt it would not survive in the West End and Christie didn't pursue the matter further.Following Christie's death, the copyright for the play was owned by her daughter, Rosalind Hicks, who was unenthusiastic about the play as it was believed that the main character was based on her. Following Hicks' death in 2004, a new production of the play, starring Jenny Seagrove and Honeysuckle Weeks and produced by Bill Kenwright, was to open in London's West End on 14 December 2009. Kenwright described the play as "brutal and incredibly honest" and "It's a good enough play to stand up without the Christie brand. It's quite a tough play. It is a substantial night at the theatre."

Arbordale Publishing

Arbordale Publishing is an independent children's book publishing company located in Mount Pleasant, SC.

Dell Comics

Dell Comics was the comic book publishing arm of Dell Publishing, which got its start in pulp magazines. It published comics from 1929 to 1974. At its peak, it was the most prominent and successful American company in the medium. In 1953 Dell claimed to be the world's largest comics publisher, selling 26 million copies each month.

Dell Magazines

Dell Magazines was a company founded by George T. Delacorte Jr. in 1921 as part of his Dell Publishing Co. Dell is today known for its many puzzle magazines, as well as fiction magazines such as Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Asimov's Science Fiction, and Analog Science Fiction and Fact. It was sold in March 1996 by Dell's successor company to Crosstown Publications, with headquarters in Norwalk, Connecticut, under the same ownership as Penny Publications, LLC, which publishes Penny Press puzzle magazines. Though the name "Dell Magazines" is still used on some of its magazines.

The first puzzle magazine Dell published was Dell Crossword Puzzles, in 1931, and since then it has printed magazines containing word searches, math and logic puzzles, and other diversions.

Dial Press

The Dial Press was a publishing house founded in 1923 by Lincoln MacVeagh.

Dial Press shared a building with The Dial and Scofield Thayer worked with both. The first imprint was issued in 1924.Authors included Elizabeth Bowen, W. R. Burnett and Glenway Wescott, Frank Yerby, James Baldwin, Roy Campbell, Susan Berman, Herbert Gold, Thomas Berger, Vance Bourjaily, Judith Rossner, and Norman Mailer.

In 1963, Dell Publishing Company acquired 60% of the Dial Press stock but the Press remained an independent subsidiary. It was jointly owned by Richard Baron and Dell Publishing; E. L. Doctorow was editor-in-chief. In 1969 the Dial Press became wholly owned by Dell Publishing Company. In 1976 Doubleday bought Dell Publishing and the children's division of Dial Press (Dial Books for Young Readers) was sold to E. P. Dutton. Dutton would be bought by New American Library, which in turn became a part of the Penguin Group, a division of Pearson PLC. Doubleday dissolved Dial Press in 1985. The adult imprint was revived by Carole Baron the publisher of Dell at the time part of Bantan/Doubleday/Dell under the leadership of Susan Kamil. It went on to gain awards and bestsellers. It was bought when BDD was sold to Random House. Penguin and Random House merged in 2013, forming Penguin Random House, with the main division part of Random House and the Young Readers division part of Penguin.

Judy Blume bibliography

This is a list of works by Judy Blume (b. 1938).

List of publishers of children's books

This is a list of publishers of children's books. The publishers may be independent, an imprint of a larger publisher, and may be currently operating or out of business.

Adarna House

American Girl

Annick Press

Anvil Publishing

Arbordale Publishing

Barefoot Books

Beaver's Pond Press

Bendon Publishing International

Big Guy Books

Bloomsbury

The Book House for Children

Candlewick Press

Capstone Publishers

Chronicle Books

Cuento de Luz

David Fickling Books

Dorling Kindersley

Dutton Children's Books

Eklavya foundation

Enslow Publishing

Figures In Motion

Gallimard Jeunesse

Gecko Press

Golden Books

Goops Unlimited

HarperCollins

Hogs Back Books

J. Lumsden and Son

Kids Can Press

Kim Dong Publishing House

Ladybird Books

Lee & Low Books

Mackinac Island Press

McLoughlin Brothers

Miles Kelly Publishing

Neal Porter Books

Nosy Crow

Orchard Books

Orion

Peace Hill Press

Prometheus Books

Purple House Press

Random House

Roaring Brook Press

Salariya Book Company

Scholastic

Simon & Schuster

Sylvan Dell Publishing

Tamarind Books

Tulika Publishers

Tu Books

Tundra Books

Usborne Publishing

Vishv Books

Man and His Symbols

Man and His Symbols is the last work undertaken by Carl Jung before his death in 1961. First published in 1964, it is divided into five parts, four of which were written by associates of Jung: Marie-Louise von Franz, Joseph L. Henderson, Aniela Jaffé, and Jolande Jacobi. The book, which contains numerous illustrations, seeks to provide a clear explanation of Jung's complex theories for a wide non-specialist readership.

Jung wrote Part 1, "Approaching the Unconscious," of the book in English.

The last year of his life was devoted almost entirely to this book, and when he died in June 1961, his own section was complete (he finished it, in fact, only some 10 days before his final illness) and his colleagues' chapters had all been approved by him in draft. . . . The chapter that bears his name is his work and (apart from some fairly extensive editing to improve its intelligibility to the general reader) nobody else's. It was written, incidentally, in English. The remaining chapters were written by the various authors to Jung's direction and under his supervision.

John Freeman, editor, page viii of the Introduction, Dell Publishing, 1968

A German-language edition of the book, Der Mensch und seine Symbole, has been published by Patmos Verlag. The illustrations included in this edition are in color.

Message from Nam

Message From Nam is a romantic novel, written by Danielle Steel and published by Dell Publishing in October 1990. It is Steel's 26th novel.

Mixed Blessings (novel)

Mixed Blessings is a romance novel written by Danielle Steel. The plot follows three different couples, who have no correlation to each other trying to make ethical decisions about modern day lives and family life. The book was published by Dell Publishing in October 1993. It is Steel's 31st novel.

Now and Forever (novel)

Now and Forever is a romance novel, written by Danielle Steel and published on 1978 by Dell Publishing. It is Steel's third novel.

Sunset in St. Tropez

Sunset in St. Tropez is a novel by Danielle Steel, published by Dell Publishing on June 3, 2003. The book is Steel's fifty-fifth best selling novel. The plot follows tales of friendship concerning three couples, who have been friends all their lives. However, when they go on holiday together to St. Tropez, they discover untold secrets and revelations concerning one another.

The Burden

The Burden is a novel written by Agatha Christie and first published in the UK by Heinemann on 12 November 1956. Initially not published in the US, it was later issued as a paperback by Dell Publishing in September 1963. It was the last of six novels Christie wrote under the nom-de-plume Mary Westmacott.

The Funnies

The Funnies was the name of two American publications from Dell Publishing, the first of these a seminal 1920s precursor of comic books, and the second a standard 1930s comic book.

The Last Arrow

The Last Arrow is a 1997 historical novel by Canadian author Marsha Canham, the third instalment of her "Medieval" trilogy inspired by the Robin Hood legend set in 13th-century England. The novel was published by Dell Publishing in 1997 as a sequel to Canham's 1994 story In the Shadow of Midnight. It received generally positive reviews from book critics.

Canham became inspired to write a new interpretation of the Robin Hood legend after experiencing a dream. She considered having several different characters represent the famous outlaw before deciding on Lord Robert Wardieu, one of the main characters featured in The Last Arrow (and the son of the hero in the first instalment Through a Dark Mist).

The Pelican Brief

The Pelican Brief is a legal-suspense thriller written by John Grisham in 1992. It is his third novel after A Time to Kill and The Firm. The hardcover edition was published by Doubleday in that same year. Two paperback editions were published, both by Dell Publishing in 1993. A film adaptation was released in 1993 starring Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington.

Thurston House (novel)

Thurston House is a romance novel by Danielle Steel. The book was first published on August 4, 1983, by Dell Publishing Company. The plot follows Jeremiah, a self-made, wealthy businessman who is looking for a lady in his life; he meets Camille, a younger female whom he had intentions to raise a great family with. For his growing family, Jeremiah builds Thurston House, which becomes one of the most symbolic mansions of San Francisco. It is Steel's fifteenth novel.

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