Del Shofner

Delbert Martin Shofner (born December 11, 1934) is a former American football wide receiver who played for eleven seasons with the Los Angeles Rams and the New York Giants from 1957 to 1967 in the National Football League (NFL).

Shofner was a five-time consensus All-Pro and Pro Bowler in 1958, 1959, and from 1961 to 1963. He led the NFL in receiving yards in 1958 with a total of 1,097 and finished second in that category in both 1959 and 1961 with totals of 936 and 1,125. In 1962, he finished second in receiving touchdowns with 12. Shofner's 1963 receiving yards total of 1,181 was his career-best and the third highest in the NFL that season.

Injuries and illness caused a decline in his effectiveness in 1964 and thereafter and he eventually was supplanted as the starting split end in the middle of the 1965 season. He retired after the 1967 NFL season.

In 2005, he was named to the Professional Football Researchers Association Hall of Very Good in the association's third HOVG class.[1]

Shofner played college football at Baylor University. He was also a punter early in his professional football career.

In addition to football, Shofner played basketball, baseball, and was a sprinter while at Baylor.

Shofner helped lead the Baylor Bears to a 13-7 victory over Tennessee in the 1957 Sugar Bowl and was voted the game's Most Valuable Player.[2]

Del Shofner
refer to caption
Shofner in 1965
No. 29, 85
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:December 11, 1934 (age 84)
Center, Texas
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:186 lb (84 kg)
Career information
College:Baylor
NFL Draft:1957 / Round: 1 / Pick: 11
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ "Hall of Very Good". Retrieved July 14, 2016.
  2. ^ from Loftis, Jack. 2003. "Jetton's Gift to BU: Shofner and Bradshaw." The 'B' Line. May 29.
1954 Baylor Bears football team

The 1954 Baylor Bears football team represented Baylor University in the 1954 college football season. The team finished with a record of 7–4 and lost the Gator Bowl to Auburn University, 13–33. Players L. G. Dupre (halfback) and James Ray Smith (tackle) played in the North–South All-Star Game; Smith, Billy Hooper (quarterback), Del Shofner (halfback) and Henry Gremminger (end) were selected as All-Conference players.

1954 Gator Bowl (December)

The 1954 Gator Bowl (December) was a college football postseason bowl game that featured the Baylor Bears and the Auburn Tigers.

1958 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), New York Daily News (NYDN), The Sporting News (SN), and United Press International (UPI) selected All-Pro teams comprising their selections of the best players at each position in the National Football League (NFL) during the 1958 NFL season.

1958 NFL season

The 1958 NFL season was the 39th regular season of the National Football League.

The Baltimore Colts defeated the New York Giants, 23–17, in the first sudden-death overtime in an NFL Championship Game. The game became known to American football fans as "The Greatest Game Ever Played."

1961 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), Pro Football Illustrated (PFI), New York Daily News (NYDN), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and Sporting News (SN) were among selectors of All-Pros for the 1961 National Football League season.

1961 New York Giants season

The 1961 New York Giants season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League. After relinquishing the NFL East title the previous season, the Giants reclaimed the title with a 10–3–1 record, only to lose to the Vince Lombardi-coached Green Bay Packers in the NFL Championship Game in Wisconsin.

1962 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1962. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1962 New York Giants season

The 1962 New York Giants season was the franchise's 38th season in the National Football League.

Giants quarterback Y. A. Tittle had a breakout season in 1962. Said Cold Hard Football Facts, "It's safe to call Tittle a late bloomer. He enjoyed various degrees of success in his first 14 seasons with three teams in two different pro football leagues. But then in 1962, at the age of 36 and under second-year head coach Allie Sherman, Tittle exploded for a record 33 TD passes to lead the Giants to a 12–2 record."

1963 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press National Football League's All-Pro Team in 1963.

Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1963 NFL Championship Game

The 1963 National Football League Championship Game was the 31st annual championship game, played on December 29 at Wrigley Field in Chicago, Illinois. The game pitted the visiting New York Giants (11–3) of the Eastern Conference against the Chicago Bears (11–1–2) of the Western Conference.Originally, NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle asked Bears owner/coach George Halas to move the game to Soldier Field for its higher seating capacity and lights, as the game could extend into multiple overtime periods. (Wrigley Field was not lighted until 25 years later, in 1988.) Soldier Field was the home field of the Chicago Cardinals in 1959, and became the home of the Bears in 1971.

When Halas refused, Rozelle moved the game's starting time up an hour to 12:05 p.m. CST for increased daylight, similar to 1960 at Franklin Field. The championship game was played in temperatures under 10 °F (−12 °C).The Giants were in their third consecutive championship game and fifth in the last six seasons. They lost to the Baltimore Colts in 1958 and 1959 and the Green Bay Packers in 1961 and 1962. The Bears were in their first championship game since a loss to the Giants in 1956 at Yankee Stadium, and had last won in 1946, over the Giants at the Polo Grounds.

This was the fifth and final NFL championship game at Wrigley Field, which hosted the first in 1933, as well as 1937, 1941, and 1943. The Bears won four, with the only loss in 1937.

Tickets were $12.50, $10, and $6. NBC paid the league $926,000 for the broadcast rights.

1963 New York Giants season

The 1963 New York Giants season was the franchise's 39th season in the National Football League. The Giants won their third consecutive NFL Eastern Conference title with an 11–3 record, their sixth in eight years, but again lost the NFL championship game. This loss was to the Chicago Bears, 14–10 at Wrigley Field, in the Giants' final post-season appearance until 1981.

Giants quarterback Y. A. Tittle produced one of the greatest passing seasons in NFL history. Tittle had had a breakout season the previous year, but according to Cold Hard Football Facts, "[h]e was even better in 1963, breaking his own record set the year before with 36 TD passes while also leading the league in completion percentage, yards per attempt and passer rating. Tittle's G-Men scored a league-leading 32.0 [points-per-game] and he lifted his team to an epic title-game showdown with the Bears, who possessed what was easily the league's best defense in 1963 (10.3 [points-per-game])."

1964 New York Giants season

The 1964 New York Giants season was the franchise's 40th season in the National Football League. The Giants won two games and lost ten, with two other games ending in a tie.

As a result, the Giants plummeted from NFL Eastern Conference Champions the previous season to last place, for their first losing season since 1953. The Giants were not to return to the postseason until 1981.

1965 New York Giants season

The 1965 New York Giants season was the franchise's 41st season in the National Football League. The Giants were led by fifth-year head coach Allie Sherman and finished with a 7–7 record, which placed them in a tie for second in the Eastern Conference with the Dallas Cowboys, four games behind the Cleveland Browns. The Cowboys won both meetings with the Giants and gained the berth as the conference runner-up in the third place Playoff Bowl in Miami.

1967 New York Giants season

The 1967 New York Giants season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League. The Giants improved from 1–12–1 the previous season to 7–7, and finished in second place in the NFL Eastern Conference/Century Division.

Bill Wade

William James "Bill" Wade (October 4, 1930 – March 9, 2016) was an American football quarterback who played professionally in the National Football League (NFL). He is considered one of the greatest athletes in Nashville and Vanderbilt University history. Wade is a member of the Tennessee Sports Hall of Fame. He is best known for being the starting quarterback on the Chicago Bears' 1963 NFL championship team.

Wade played for Vanderbilt University. He was named the Southeastern Conference's (SEC) Most Valuable Player and a second-team All-American. He was named MVP of the 1951 North–South Shrine Game in Miami. Wade also played in the Senior Bowl of 1952 and was selected to play in the College All-Star Game in Chicago.

He was the first player selected in the 1952 NFL draft, by the Los Angeles Rams.

Quarterbacking the Rams for seven seasons, Wade's best year personally was 1958, when he led the NFL in passing yards with 2,875. He was traded to the Bears in 1961 with teammates Del Shofner and John Guzik for two players and a draft pick. Wade topped the league in 1962 in pass completions and attempts, and threw for 466 yards on Nov 11 in Dallas, second in franchise history to Johnny Lujack (468) . He was the first Bear to record four games with 300+ passing yards in a season. In 1963, he led Chicago to the 1963 NFL Championship Game, scoring both Bears touchdowns on two 5-yard drives after turnovers in a 14–10 victory over the New York Giants in a game played in freezing weather conditions at Wrigley Field.

Wade was named to the Vanderbilt Athletics Hall of Fame as part of its inaugural class.Following eye surgery for glaucoma, Wade became legally blind. In an interview with Mike Downey of the Chicago Tribune on January 30, 2007, days before the Bears played in Super Bowl XLI in Miami Gardens, Florida, Wade said from his Nashville home, "I could get there for the game, but I can't see it." He added: "I've got a Bears cap on right now." He died on March 9, 2016 in Nashville.

Center, Texas

Center is a city in Shelby County, Texas. The population was 5,193 at the 2010 U.S. Census. It is the county seat of Shelby County. It was named for its location near the center of Shelby County, not its location in Texas; it is near the Louisiana border.

List of National Football League annual receiving yards leaders

In American football, passing, along with running (also referred to as rushing), is one of the two main methods of advancing the ball down the field. Passes are typically attempted by the quarterback, but any offensive player can attempt a pass provided they are behind the line of scrimmage. To qualify as a passing play, the ball must have initially moved forward after leaving the hands of the passer; if the ball initially moved laterally or backwards, the play would instead be considered a running play. A player who catches a forward pass is a receiver, and the number of receiving yards each player has recorded in each season is a recorded stat in football games. In addition to the overall National Football League (NFL) receiving champion, league record books recognize statistics from the American Football League (AFL), which operated from 1960 to 1969 before being absorbed into the NFL in 1970, Although league record books do not recognize stats from the All-America Football Conference, another league that merged with the NFL, these statistics are recognized by the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The NFL did not begin keeping official records until the 1932 season. The average the yards the leader has gained has increased over time – since the adoption of the 14-game season in 1961, all but one season saw the receiving leader record over 1,000 yards. No player has ever finished with over 2,000 receiving yards in a season; the current record is 1,964 yards, set by Calvin Johnson during the 2012 season. Wes Chandler, who led the league with 1,032 yards in the strike-shortened 1982 season, averaged 129 yards receiving per game, an NFL record.Don Hutson led the league in receiving yards seven times, the most of any player; Jerry Rice is second with six. Hutson also recorded the most consecutive seasons leading the league in receiving, doing so for five seasons from 1941 to 1945, while Jerry Rice ranks second with three consecutive league-leading seasons from 1993 to 1995. A Green Bay Packers player has led the league in receiving yards eleven times, the most in the NFL; the Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams rank second with nine league-leading seasons. The most recent receiving yards leader was Julio Jones of the Atlanta Falcons, who recorded 1,677 receiving yards over the 2018 season.

National Football League 1960s All-Decade Team

This is a list of National Football League (NFL) players who had outstanding performances throughout the 1960s and have been compiled together into this fantasy group. The team was selected by voters of the Pro Football Hall of Fame at the end of the decade.

Shofner

Shofner is the surname of the following people:

Austin Shofner (1916–1999), United States Marine Corps officer

Del Shofner (born 1934), American football wide receiver

Jim Shofner (born 1935), American football player and coach

Strick Shofner (1919–1998), American major league baseball player

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