Debs Garms

Debs C. Garms (June 26, 1907 – December 16, 1984) was a professional baseball player for 12 seasons as an outfielder and third baseman for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Braves, Pittsburgh Pirates, and St. Louis Cardinals. Garms broke up Johnny Vander Meer's streak of hitless innings in 1938. He won the National League batting title in 1940, hitting .355 for the Pirates despite having played in only 103 games and garnering 358 at bats. Garms' batting title proved very controversial because of his limited playing time.[1] In 1941, he set a then-major league record for consecutive pinch hits with seven, which stood until Dave Philley broke it in 1958.

Debs Garms
Debs Garms 1940 Play Ball card.jpeg
Garms with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1940
Outfielder / Third baseman
Born: June 26, 1907
Bangs, Texas
Died: December 16, 1984 (aged 77)
Glen Rose, Texas
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 10, 1932, for the St. Louis Browns
Last MLB appearance
September 25, 1945, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Batting average.293
Home runs17
Runs batted in328
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Born in Bangs, Texas, Garms was the eighth of 10 children, and was named after Eugene Debs. Garms' older sister married Slim Harriss, a pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox in the 1920s.[1] Garms attended Howard Payne University, joining the track and baseball teams. One of Garms' games was attended by minor league manager Carl Williams, and soon after, Garms was signed to a minor league contract with the St. Louis Browns. After playing in the minor leagues for multiple years, Garms batted .344 in 1932 and was called up to the major league Browns.[1]

Career

In 1936, Garms was drafted by the Boston Bees from the Browns in the rule 5 draft. In 1938, Bees' manager Casey Stengel platooned Garms with Joe Stripp.[2] After three seasons with the Bees, Garms was purchased by the Pittsburgh Pirates. In 1940, his first year with the Pirates, Garms won the National League batting title despite serving as a platoon player, recording only 358 at-bats in 103 games.[2] Despite the fact that many complained at the low batting averages in 1940 compared to past years, most assumed that 400 at-bats were needed to be eligible for a batting title. In September 1940, league president Ford Frick stated, "The batting title is simply unofficial and never has been subject for league legislation." Frick's spokesman said, "he thought 100 games would be a sufficient prerequisite for the championship."

After the season, the league's decision to make Garms the champion remained controversial, particularly for Chicago Cubs fans, who believed that Stan Hack was the rightful winner.[1] In December 1941, Garms was purchased by the St. Louis Cardinals, with whom Garms played the last three seasons of his career after playing the 1942 season in the minor leagues.[3]

In 12 seasons and 1,010 games, Garms hit .293 (910 for 3111) with 438 runs scored, 141 doubles, 39 triples, 17 home runs, 328 RBI, 288 walks, .355 on-base percentage, and a .379 slugging percentage. He appeared in the 1943 World Series and 1944 World Series, and was hitless in seven at-bats.

After baseball

After Garms retired, he purchased a ranch in Glen Rose, Texas. Garms lived at the ranch until the 1950s, when the severe Texas drought forced him to sell the ranch and move into town in 1959, where he worked as foreman for a lime quarry operation, and eventually served on the school board for Glen Rose Independent School District. Garms was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in the 1980s, and died on December 16, 1984.[1] In 2004, Garms was inducted into the Texas Baseball Hall of Fame.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Erion, Greg. "Debs Garms". sabr.org. SABR. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  2. ^ a b Loomis, Tom (May 13, 1987). "Don't Blame Casey Stengel For Inventing Platoon System". Toledo Blade. p. 26. Retrieved February 3, 2014.
  3. ^ "Debs Garms Statistics and History". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved 12 June 2012.

External links

1907 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1907 throughout the world.

1932 St. Louis Browns season

The 1932 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 63 wins and 91 losses.

1933 St. Louis Browns season

The 1933 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 55 wins and 96 losses, 43½ games behind the AL Champion Washington Senators.

1934 St. Louis Browns season

The 1934 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 6th in the American League with a record of 67 wins and 85 losses.

1935 St. Louis Browns season

The 1935 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 65 wins and 87 losses.

1937 Boston Bees season

The 1937 Boston Bees season was the 67th season of the franchise. They finished the season with 79 wins and 73 losses.

1938 Boston Bees season

The 1938 Boston Bees season was the 68th season of the franchise.

1939 Boston Bees season

The 1939 Boston Bees season was the 69th season of the franchise.

1940 Major League Baseball season

The 1940 Major League Baseball season was a very good season for baseball where many stars had great years, the Cincinnati Reds won the world series against the Detroit Tigers and the following players won MVP in their respective divisions, Hank Greenberg of the Detroit Tigers and Frank McCormick of the Cincinnati Reds. The 1940 Major League Baseball season started on April 16th and was carried out until October 8th, 1940.

1941 Play Ball Cards

The Play Ball baseball card sets, issued by Gum Inc. from 1939 to 1941, are sets filled with various rookies, stars, and Hall of Famers. The 1941 set has a total of 72 cards. The more valuable cards in the set include Ted Williams ($1500), Joe DiMaggio ($2500), and the rookie Pee Wee Reese ($400–$600). Any Play Ball cards are relatively rare, and if highly graded the cards demand a premium. The 1941 Play Ball set is the only Play Ball set with color.

1943 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1943 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 62nd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 52nd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 105–49 during the season and finished 1st in the National League. In the World Series, they met the New York Yankees. They lost the series in 5 games.

1944 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1944 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 63rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 53rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 105–49 during the season and finished 1st in the National League. In the World Series, they met their town rivals, the St. Louis Browns. They won the series in 6 games.

1945 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1945 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 64th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 54th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 95–59 during the season and finished 2nd in the National League. The Cardinals set a Major League record which still stands, for the fewest double plays grounded into during a season, with only 75.

Abilene Aces

The Abilene Aces were a West Texas League baseball team based in Abilene, Texas, United States that played from 1928 to 1929. They reached the league finals in 1928, ultimately losing the playoff. Notable players include Debs Garms and Euel Moore.

Augusta Tigers

The Augusta Yankees were a South Atlantic League minor league baseball team based in Augusta, Georgia that played from 1962 to 1963. The team was managed by Ernie White in 1962 and Rube Walker in 1963. It played its home games at Jennings Stadium. Notable players include Pete Mikkelsen, Dooley Womack and Roger Repoz.The Augusta Tigers were a minor league baseball team that existed on-and-off from 1936 to 1958. Based in Augusta, Georgia, they played in the South Atlantic League from 1936 to 1942, from 1946 to 1952 and from 1955 to 1958. They were affiliated with the Detroit Tigers in 1936, from 1941 to 1942 and from 1955 to 1958. From 1937 to 1940 and from 1946 to 1949 they were affiliated with the New York Yankees. In 1950, they were affiliated with the Washington Senators. They played their home games at Jennings Stadium.The Augusta Wolves were a South Atlantic League (1930) and Palmetto League (1931) minor league baseball team based in Augusta, Georgia. The team played its home games at Jennings Stadium. Multiple notable players spent time with the team, including Debs Garms and Wally Moses.The Augusta Tygers were a minor league baseball team based in Augusta, Georgia, USA. They played in the South Atlantic League from 1922 to 1929. In 1926, under manager Johnny Nee, they were the league champions.They were named after Ty Cobb, who began his professional career in Augusta in 1904.They played their home games at Jennings Stadium.

The Augusta Georgians were a minor league baseball team that played from 1920 to 1921 in the South Atlantic League. Based in Augusta, Georgia, USA, they were managed by Dolly Stark in 1920 and by Emil Huhn in 1921. Under Stark, they went 55-68, and under Huhn they went 78-68.Notable players include Troy Agnew, Bud Davis, Doc Knowlson, Curt Walker, Doc Bass, Don Songer, and Stark himself.

Bangs, Texas

Bangs is a city located in Brown County in west-central Texas, in the United States. The population was 1,603 at the 2010 census.

Debs

Debs might refer to:

Surname:

Bandali Debs (born 1953), Australian convicted serial killer

Barbara Knowles Debs (born 1931), American art historian and former president of Manhattanville College

Ernest E. Debs (1904–2002), American politician

Eugene V. Debs (1855-1926), American union leader and presidential candidate of the Socialist Party of America

Felipe El Debs (born 1985), Brazilian chess GrandmasterGiven name:

Debs Garms (1907-1984), American Major League Baseball playerOther uses:

Debs, Minnesota, United States, a small town

D.E.B.S. (2003 film), a short, independent film about a squad of heroines

D.E.B.S. (2004 film), a feature-length film spawned by the short film

Debs School, Colorado, United States, a one-room schoolhouse on the National Register of Historic Places

Debs (ball), a formal ball for schools in Ireland

Platoon system

The platoon system in baseball or football is a method directing the situational substitution of players to create tactical advantage.

Topeka Owls

The Topeka Owls was the primary name of the minor league baseball franchise based in Topeka, Kansas, USA.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.