Daylami language

The Daylami language, also known as Daylamite, Deilami, Dailamite, or Deylami (Deilami: دیلمی, from the name of the Daylam region), is an extinct language that was one of the northwestern branch of the Iranian languages. It was spoken in northern Iran, specifically in the mountainous area in Gīlān, Mazandaran, and Ghazvin Provinces.

Parviz Natel Khanlari listed this language as one of Iranian dialects spoken between the 9th and 13th centuries. Istakhri, a medieval Iranian geographer, has written about this language, as did Al-Muqaddasi, a medieval Arab geographer, who wrote "they have an obscure language and they use the phoneme khe /x/ a lot."[2] Abū Esḥāq Ṣābī had a similar report on people in the Deylam highlands who spoke a distinct language.[3]

According to Wilfered Madelung, in the early Islamic period the language of the Deylamites was a northwestern Iranian language. One of the characteristics of this language was an added ī sound between consonants and ā (Lāhījān=Līāhījān, Amīrkā=Amīrkīā).[4]

Deilami
ديلمی
Native toIran
RegionSouth Caspian Sea, Alborz highlands
Era900–1300AD[1]
Persian alphabet
Language codes
ISO 639-3None (mis)
GlottologNone

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Mehdi Marashi, Mohammad Ali Jazayery, Persian studies in North America: studies in honor of Mohammad Ali Jazayery, Ibex Publishers, Inc., 1994, ISBN 0-936347-35-X, 9780936347356, p. 269
  2. ^ Mehdi Marashi, Mohammad Ali Jazayery, Persian studies in North America: studies in honor of Mohammad Ali Jazayery, Ibex Publishers, Inc., 1994, ISBN 0-936347-35-X, 9780936347356, p. 269
  3. ^ Wilferd Madelung. Abū Isḥāq al-Ṣābī on the Alids of Tabaristān and Gīlān. Journal of Near Eastern Studies, Vol. 26, No. 1 (Jan., 1967), pp. 17-57, University of Chicago Press
  4. ^ Wilferd Maelung, Deylamites Encyclopedia Iranica
Daylamites

The Daylamites or Dailamites (Middle Persian: Daylamīgān; Persian: دیلمیان‎ Deylamiyān) were an Iranian people inhabiting the Daylam—the mountainous regions of northern Iran on the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. They were employed as soldiers from the time of the Sasanian Empire, and long resisted the Muslim conquest of Persia and subsequent Islamization. In the 930s, the Daylamite Buyid dynasty emerged and managed to gain control over much of modern-day Iran, which it held until the coming of the Seljuq Turks in the mid-11th century.

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