David Wells

David Lee Wells (born May 20, 1963), nicknamed "Boomer", is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher. Wells was considered to be one of the game's better left-handed pitchers, especially during his years with the New York Yankees and the Toronto Blue Jays. He pitched the 15th perfect game in baseball history. He is tied only with Kenny Lofton for appearing in the post-season with six teams. Wells is currently a broadcaster on MLB on TBS and the host of The Cheap Seats on FOXSports.com.

David Wells
David Wells on July 16, 2007
Wells with the Padres in July 2007
Pitcher
Born: May 20, 1963 (age 56)
Torrance, California
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 30, 1987, for the Toronto Blue Jays
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 2007, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record239–157
Earned run average4.13
Strikeouts2,201
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Wells was born in Torrance, California.[1] His parents were never married and he was thus raised by his mother. Wells grew up with the belief that his father, David Pritt, was dead. However, at the age of 22, he learned that Pritt was alive and tracked him down to start a new relationship with him.

Growing up in the San Diego neighborhood of Ocean Beach[2] where he attended local public schools, Wells was dependent on his mother who worked numerous jobs to support him and his four siblings. He graduated from Point Loma High School, where he played baseball and basketball, in 1982 and was a self-described "gym rat" who spent most of his time at the Ocean Beach Recreation Center and Robb Field.[3] Wells was Point Loma High School’s star pitcher and threw a perfect game his senior year.[4]

Professional career

Toronto Blue Jays (1987–1992)

Wells debuted for the Toronto Blue Jays in 1987 as a reliever and did not secure a job as a full-time starter until he was 30 years old. During his six seasons with the Blue Jays, Wells compiled a 47–46 record and a 3.88 ERA altogether. Wells was part of the 1992 World Series winning team, the first time he got a championship ring. He was released by the Blue Jays during spring training on March 30, 1993.

Detroit Tigers (1993–1995)

A few days after he was released by the Blue Jays, Wells signed with the Detroit Tigers on April 3.[1] In 1993, Wells made 32 appearances (30 starts) with an 11-9 record and a 4.19 ERA. In 1994, a season that was cut short due to a lockout, Wells started 16 games, finishing 5-7 with a 3.96 ERA and 5 complete games. He emerged as a top-flight pitcher in 1995, when he was 32. After starting the year at 10–3 with a 3.04 ERA for the struggling last-place Tigers, Wells made his first All-Star Game appearance.[1]

Cincinnati Reds (1995)

On July 31, Wells was traded to the Cincinnati Reds for C. J. Nitkowski, Mark Lewis, and minor leaguer Dave Tuttle. With Cincinnati, Wells compiled a 6–5 record and a 3.59 ERA.[1]

Baltimore Orioles (1996)

After the 1995 season, Wells was traded to the Baltimore Orioles for Curtis Goodwin and minor leaguer Trovin Valdez.[1] In 1996, he pitched a then-career high 224 innings but finished with an 11–14 record and a 5.14 ERA.[1]

New York Yankees (1997–1998)

In 1997, Wells signed as a free agent with the New York Yankees, his favorite team because of a lifelong interest in baseball legend Babe Ruth. He asked for uniform number 3, Ruth's long-retired number, and was of course denied. He ended up taking 33 for the Yankees. On June 28, 1997, Wells took the mound wearing an authentic 1934 Babe Ruth hat, which he had bought for $35,000. Manager Joe Torre made Wells take it off after the first inning because it didn't conform to uniform standards. Wells then blew a 3–0 lead as the Cleveland Indians won 12–8. After posting a 16–10 mark in 1997, Wells pitched very well in the Yankees' record-setting 1998 season. He rang up an 18–4 record, finished fifth in the league in ERA (3.49), was third in voting for the Cy Young Award, and won a second World Series ring.

Perfect game

On May 17, 1998, Wells pitched the 15th perfect game in baseball history, when he blanked the Minnesota Twins, 4–0. Wells attended the same San Diego high school, Point Loma High School, as Don Larsen, whose perfect game for the Yankees in the 1956 World Series was the only perfect game or no-hitter ever thrown in postseason play until 2010, and was until then the only perfect game thrown by a Yankee. David Cone would add a third Yankee perfect game in 1999. Wells claimed that he threw the perfect game while being hung over.[5][6] Comedian Jimmy Fallon, who had partied with Wells the night before the game, has backed up this claim.[7]

On September 1, 1998, Wells came fairly close to recording a second perfect game. Pitching against the Oakland Athletics, he allowed no walks and only two hits, the first of which came with two outs in the seventh inning when Jason Giambi fought off an 0–2 count and singled.[8]

Second stint with the Toronto Blue Jays (1999–2000)

After the season, Wells returned to the Blue Jays as part of a trade for Roger Clemens, along with Homer Bush and Graeme Lloyd. He continued to win north of the border, with records of 17–10 and 20–8 over the next two years.

During this stint with the Blue Jays, Wells managed to appear on the cover of Sports Illustrated just prior to the 2000 All Star Game.[9] Though Wells said it was an honour to be on the cover, he blasted the story itself, "The David Wells Diet: Chips, Beer and American League batters" written by Jeff Pearlman, saying all Pearlman did was talk about how fat he was and not about his accomplishments.[9]

Chicago White Sox (2001)

Wells along with fellow pitcher Matt DeWitt were traded to the Chicago White Sox, in a deal that was quickly mired in controversy. The primary player being traded by the White Sox, starting pitcher Mike Sirotka, was injured at the time of the deal, and he never pitched in the major leagues again. Toronto's general manager, Gord Ash, had not made the deal contingent on the results of a medical examination, however, and MLB ruled in favor of the White Sox. The Blue Jays thus received only Kevin Beirne, Brian Simmons, and minor leaguer Mike Williams, and the mistake ultimately cost Ash his job.

The deal did not turn out particularly well for the White Sox, either, as Wells struggled with back problems in 2001 and pitched only 100⅔ innings. Wells went 5–7 with a 4.47 ERA during his year with the White Sox.

Second stint with the New York Yankees (2002–2003)

After a short season with the White Sox, Wells returned to the Yankees, a deal that was again immersed in controversy as he had already reached an oral agreement to join the Arizona Diamondbacks.[10] Despite having lost some velocity from his fastball, he retained his excellent curveball and his control, and posted an outstanding 19–7 record in 2002.

Wells was the subject of some controversy prior to the 2003 season, when his autobiography Perfect I'm Not: Boomer on Beer, Brawls, Backaches and Baseball, was published. The book upset the Yankees' management, and Wells was fined $100,000 by the team for disparaging comments which appeared in it.[11] One of them included himself having a hangover when he pitched his perfect game.[11][12] Among the other controversial statements were claims that he strengthened his pitching arm as a youth by throwing rocks at homeless people[12] and that his minor league team, the Kinston Blue Jays, had segregated stands in 1983 despite ample evidence to the contrary. Amusingly, Wells claimed to have been misquoted in the book, which was presumably penned by a ghost writer. The problems didn't carry over to the field, however. Wells posted a 15–7 record and helped the Yankees win another pennant.[1]

On September 28, 2003, the final day of the regular season, Wells earned the 200th win of his career in a game managed by Clemens, who had won his 300th game earlier in the season and was thought to be retiring from baseball (Clemens ended up delaying his retirement). Regular Yankees manager Joe Torre let Clemens manage the final game of the regular season, and Clemens pulled Wells from the game in the eighth inning.[13]

He was also criticized by Yankee fans for not being able to pitch during Game 5 of the 2003 World Series. He started the game, but left during the first inning because of a bad backache, which caused Torre to use his bullpen to finish the game.[14] The Yankees ended up losing the game and the series to the Florida Marlins in six games.

San Diego Padres (2004)

On January 1, 2004, Wells was signed as a free agent by the San Diego Padres to a one-year contract. Wells posted a 12–8 record with a 3.73 ERA to start off his second stint in the National League.

Boston Red Sox (2005–2006)

On December 11, 2004, Wells signed a two-year deal with the Boston Red Sox and took the uniform number 3, in honor of Babe Ruth. Getting off to a bad start, many fans questioned the decision of general manager Theo Epstein, but after coming off of the DL and getting rocked in his first start back in Oakland — and changing his uniform number from 3 to 16 – David Wells became the same dominating pitcher he was in the past. He went on to post a 15–7 record, with a 4.45 ERA. Wells pitched much better than his ERA may show, but had a few very poor outings, which caused his ERA to "balloon." After the 2005 season, Wells requested a trade back to the West Coast, but he eventually withdrew that request and resigned himself to one last year pitching for the Red Sox.

David Wells pitches wp
Wells pitching for the Red Sox in 2006

Wells began the 2006 season on the disabled list, as he was still recovering from surgery performed on his right knee. After pitching one game on April 12, he was again placed on the 15-day disabled list. He announced that if his knee did not improve he would retire. Wells came off the disabled list on May 26, to make his second start of the year against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays.

Second stint with the San Diego Padres (2006–2007)

On August 31, 2006, with the Red Sox postseason chances fading, Wells' wish of finishing his career playing for a West Coast team and a playoff contender was granted when he was traded back to the Padres for top catching prospect George Kottaras.

Following the 2006 season, Wells filed for free agency. For players who are already planning on retiring, this is a customary move in case one changes his mind. Wells' agent had stated the pitcher will keep his options open but his physical condition will play a large part in making the final decision whether or not to return for another season.[15] Eventually, Wells decided to stay with the Padres, agreeing in principle on a one-year deal worth $3 million in base salary with a possible $4 million more in incentives.

On March 18, 2007, the media revealed that Wells has been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. This form of diabetes is more closely associated with lifestyle factors, such as diet, but the condition of people with a genetic disposition for diabetes can be exacerbated with chronic high blood sugar, as insulin resistance can be an adaptation of insulin in the wake of too-high blood sugar over time.[16]

On August 8, the Padres announced they would cut ties with Wells when Chris Young was ready to come off the disabled list.[17]

Los Angeles Dodgers (2007)

On August 23, 2007, Wells was signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers. His first start with the Dodgers was on August 26 against the New York Mets. He pitched five innings and allowed two earned runs. Wells also reached first base on a bunt single, scored a run, and earned the victory. He was the oldest pitcher to start a game for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

On September 13, 2007, against his former team, the San Diego Padres, Wells had his first multi-hit game of his 21-year career at the age of 44. He hit a single and a double off former teammate Greg Maddux. Wells finished the season with the Dodgers going 4–1 with a 5.12 ERA. Wells filed for free agency after the 2007 season.

Old Timers Day and retirement

On August 2, 2008, Wells took part in the 62nd Annual Old Timers Day at Yankee Stadium, where he said that he was not going to officially retire, but admitted that his pitching career was probably over.[18]

Post-retirement activities

Personal life

Wells lives in San Diego with his wife and two sons.[2] He has a tattoo of Babe Ruth.[19]

Broadcasting

TBS Analyst David Wells
Wells with TBS

Beginning in 2009, Wells began working for MLB on TBS doing regular & post-season coverage. In 2011, Wells became host of The Cheap Seats on FOXSports.com. In 2019, Wells began providing color commentary for the YES Network.

Interviews, biographies, and autobiographies

In 2010, David Wells was interviewed by Jane Mitchell for the television show One on One. In addition to David's story in his own words, the interview featured Kevin Towers, Trevor Hoffman, Josh Barfield, Chris Young, Mariano Rivera, Derek Jeter, Clay Hensley, family, and friends, all sharing their personal experiences and thoughts about David.[20]

Coaching

Wells served as a baseball assistant coach at his alma mater Point Loma High School for several years. The high school announced on June 17, 2014 that Wells will be the head baseball coach there, starting with the 2014–2015 school year. The team's home field was named David Wells Field in 2010.[21][22] In 2014, David Wells Field went through a $2-million renovation which was underwritten by the San Diego Unified School District and David Wells.[23]

Career bests

  • Wins in a Season: 20, with Toronto Blue Jays in 2000
  • Strikeouts in a Season: 169, with Toronto Blue Jays in 2000
  • Best Cy Young Result: 3rd, with New York Yankees in 1998
  • Strikeouts in One Game: 16 with New York Yankees, against Oakland Athletics, July 30, 1997
  • Innings Pitched in One Season: 231.2, with Toronto Blue Jays in 1999
  • Best Single Season ERA as a Starting Pitcher: 3.14, with Toronto Blue Jays in 1990
  • Fewest Walks Per 9 Innings in a Season: .85, with New York Yankees in 2003

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "David Wells Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports-Reference.com. Retrieved March 22, 2017.
  2. ^ a b WRITER, Chris Jenkins STAFF. "Wells stays true to himself".
  3. ^ "Famous OBcean and Major League Pitcher David Wells Honored". obrag.org.
  4. ^ "Wells, David"Current Biography Yearbook. The H.W. Wilson Company. 2004. P.570
  5. ^ Mark Feinsand (March 1, 2003). "Book 'em, David: Wells explains". MLB.com. Retrieved October 2, 2009.
  6. ^ "Wells said he threw perfect game while 'half drunk'".
  7. ^ Late Night with Seth Meyers (April 26, 2018), Jimmy Fallon Reminisces on Pitching an SNL Sketch to Mick Jagger, retrieved April 26, 2018
  8. ^ "Oakland Athletics at New York Yankees Box Score, September 1, 1998 - Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  9. ^ a b Larry Millson (July 6, 2000). "Wells latest victim of 'writer'". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved August 8, 2017.
  10. ^ Rubin, Adam (January 11, 2002). "With Wells, Boss Beefs Up Rotation Deal Over Burgers". Daily News.
  11. ^ a b Curry, Jack (March 10, 2003). "BASEBALL; Yankees And Wells Hope Fine Ends Story". The New York Times.
  12. ^ a b Baxter, Kevin (August 31, 2007). "The Big Easy". Los Angeles Times.
  13. ^ "The Hour - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  14. ^ "David Wells calls Joe Torre 'such a tool'".
  15. ^ "Wells keeps options open; will declare for free agency". ESPN.com. November 2, 2006.
  16. ^ "Padres' Wells has diabetes but vows to 'beat it'". ESPN.com. March 19, 2007.
  17. ^ "Career over? 'Boomer' Wells, Pads set to cut ties". ESPN.com. August 8, 2007.
  18. ^ "David Wells, SP, Retired Players".
  19. ^ http://offthebench.nbcsports.com/2011/09/02/david-wells-babe-ruth-tattoo-is-kind-of-amazing/
  20. ^ Mitchell, Jane (2010). "One on One – My Journey with Hall of Famers, Fan Favorites and Rising Stars". Retrieved from http://www.JaneMitchellOneOnOne.com.
  21. ^ Hopkins, Scott (June 19, 2014). "MLB All-Star David Wells to helm PLHS baseball". Peninsula Beacon.
  22. ^ "Point Loma Field Named for David Wells, Former Yankee, Blue Jay Star, Gets Big Facelift - Times of San Diego". July 1, 2014.
  23. ^ Culver, Heather. "Ex-MLB Player David "Boomer" Wells Dedicates Namesake Baseball Field". NBC San Diego. Retrieved January 19, 2015.

External links

1998 American League Championship Series

The 1998 American League Championship Series (ALCS), the second round of the 1998 American League playoffs, was played between the East Division champion New York Yankees and the Central Division champion Cleveland Indians.

The Yankees defeated the Indians four games to two and went on to sweep the National League champion San Diego Padres in the 1998 World Series to win their twenty-fourth World Series championship. New York, who won 114 games during the regular season, recorded their only two losses of the 1998 postseason in this series.

1998 Minnesota Twins season

Like many Twins teams of its half-decade, the 1998 Minnesota Twins neither impressed nor contended. The team finished with a 70-92 record, with subpar batting and pitching. The season was not without its bright spots, as individual players had solid seasons and Hall of Fame designated hitter Paul Molitor announced his retirement at the end of the season. Tom Kelly's team had plenty of lowlights, most notably David Wells' perfect game against the team on May 17 at Yankee Stadium.

2003 New York Yankees season

The New York Yankees' 2003 season was the 101st season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 101-61 finishing 6 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the playoffs, they defeated the Red Sox in 7 games in the ALCS, winning the pennant on Aaron Boone's dramatic 11th-inning home run. The Yankees advanced to the World Series, losing in a dramatic 6 game series to the Florida Marlins. It would be their second World Series loss in three years and last appearance in a World Series until 2009.

David Cone's perfect game

On July 18, 1999, David Cone of the New York Yankees pitched the 16th perfect game in Major League Baseball (MLB) history and the third in team history, and the first no-hit game in regular season interleague play. Pitching against the Montreal Expos at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx in front of 41,930 fans in attendance, Cone retired all 27 batters that he faced. The game took 2 hours and 16 minutes, from 2:05 PM ET to 4:54 PM ET. The game was interrupted by a 33-minute rain delay in the bottom of the third inning in the middle of an at-bat for Tino Martinez. As part of the day's "Yogi Berra Day" festivities honoring the Yankees' former catcher, before the game, former Yankees pitcher Don Larsen threw the ceremonial first pitch to Berra; the two comprised the battery for Larsen's perfect game in 1956.

Cone's perfect game was the 247th no-hitter in MLB history, and 11th, and to date last no-hitter in Yankees history. The previous perfect game in both MLB and Yankee history was 14 months prior on May 17, 1998, when David Wells pitched a perfect game against the Minnesota Twins at Yankee Stadium; Wells' perfect game was also the most recent no-hitter in franchise history at the time. Cone's perfect game gave the Yankees the record for the franchise with most perfect games, breaking a two-perfect game tie with the Cleveland Indians. Since Cone's perfect game, the Oakland Athletics, Philadelphia Phillies, and Chicago White Sox have recorded their second perfect games, with the White Sox tying the Yankees with a third perfect game in 2012. To date, Cone's perfect game is the only one achieved in regular season interleague play.

David Wells' perfect game

On May 17, 1998, David Wells of the New York Yankees pitched the 15th perfect game in Major League Baseball history and the second in team history. Pitching against the Minnesota Twins at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx in front of 49,820 fans in attendance, Wells retired all 27 batters he faced. The game took 2 hours and 40 minutes to complete, from 1:36 PM ET to 4:16 PM ET. Wells claimed in a 2001 interview with Bryant Gumbel on HBO's Real Sports that he threw the perfect game while being hung over. Jimmy Fallon claimed in a 2018 interview with Seth Meyers that he and Wells had attended a Saturday Night Live after-party until 5:30 A.M. ET the morning of the game. In an interview, David Wells also mentioned having partied with Jimmy Fallon and Seth Meyers the night before. However, there was no new episode of Saturday Night Live the previous night, as the season finale had aired the week prior.Wells' perfect game was the 245th no-hitter in MLB history and the tenth no-hitter in Yankees history. It was the first regular-season perfect game pitched by a Yankee; the franchise's previous perfect game was thrown by Don Larsen during the 1956 World Series. By coincidence, Wells graduated from the same high school as Larsen - Point Loma High School in San Diego, California. The previous perfect game in MLB history was nearly four years prior, when Kenny Rogers of the Texas Rangers pitched a perfect game against the California Angels at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington on July 28, 1994.

Wells' perfect game was the first Yankee no-hitter since Dwight Gooden's against the Seattle Mariners in May 1996. Wells' performance tied the record for franchises with most perfect games. At the time, the Cleveland Indians were the only other team to have two perfect games; David Cone added a third perfect game to Yankees history, breaking the record in July 1999.

Three months later, on September 1, Wells took a perfect game into the seventh inning in a game against the Oakland Athletics, but he gave up a two-out single to Jason Giambi to end his bid for an unprecedented second perfect game. Wells ended up with a two-hit shutout as the Yankees won the game, 7-0.

David Wells (admiral)

Rear Admiral David Charles Wells, (19 November 1918 – 27 September 1983) was a senior commander in the Royal Australian Navy, who commanded ANZUK in Singapore from its formation in November 1971 until 1973.

David Wells (medium)

David Wells (born 8 June 1960) is a Scottish medium and astrologer. He has been featured as the main medium on Living TV's paranormal documentary series Most Haunted as well as its spin-off Most Haunted Live!.

David Wells (politician)

David Mark Wells (born February 28, 1962) is a Canadian senator from Newfoundland and Labrador. He was appointed to the Senate on January 25, 2013. Wells served as deputy CEO of the Canada–Newfoundland and Labrador Offshore Petroleum Board.

Jonathan Wells (intelligent design advocate)

John Corrigan "Jonathan" Wells (born 1942) is an American biologist, author, and advocate of the pseudoscientific argument of intelligent design. Wells joined the Unification Church in 1974, and subsequently wrote that the teachings of church founder Sun Myung Moon, his own studies at the Unification Theological Seminary and his prayers convinced him to devote his life to "destroying Darwinism." The term Darwinism is often used by intelligent design proponents and other creationists to refer to the scientific consensus on evolution. He gained a PhD in religious studies at Yale University in 1986, then became Director of the Unification Church’s inter-religious outreach organization in New York City. In 1989, he studied at the University of California, Berkeley, where he earned a PhD in molecular and cellular biology in 1994. He became a member of several scientific associations and has published in academic journals.

In his book Icons of Evolution: Science or Myth? (2000), Wells argues that a number of examples used to illustrate biology textbooks were grossly exaggerated, distorted truth, or were patently false. Wells said that this shows that evolution conflicts with the evidence, and so argued against its teaching in public education. Some reviewers of Icons of Evolution have said that Wells misquoted experts cited as sources and took minor issues out of context, basing his argument on a flawed syllogism. but Wells has responded insisting those accusations are untrue. Wells's views on evolution have been rejected by the scientific community.

List of Major League Baseball perfect games

Over the 144 years of Major League Baseball history, and over 218,400 games played, there have been 23 official perfect games by the current definition. No pitcher has ever thrown more than one. The perfect game thrown by Don Larsen in game 5 of the 1956 World Series is the only postseason perfect game in major league history and one of only two postseason no-hitters. The first two major league perfect games, and the only two of the premodern era, were thrown in 1880, five days apart. The most recent perfect game was thrown on August 15, 2012, by Félix Hernández of the Seattle Mariners. There were three perfect games in 2012; the only other year of the modern era in which as many as two were thrown was 2010. By contrast, there have been spans of 23 and 33 consecutive seasons in which not a single perfect game was thrown. Though two perfect-game bids have gone into extra innings, no extra-inning game has ever been completed to perfection.

The first two pitchers to accomplish the feat did so under rules that differed in many important respects from those of today's game: in 1880, for example, only underhand pitching—from a flat, marked-out box 45 feet from home plate—was allowed, it took eight balls to draw a walk, and a batter was not awarded first base if hit by a pitch. Lee Richmond, a left-handed pitcher for the Worcester Ruby Legs, threw the first perfect game. He played professional baseball for six years and pitched full-time for only three, finishing with a losing record. The second perfect game was thrown by John Montgomery Ward for the Providence Grays. Ward, a decent pitcher who became an excellent position player, went on to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Though convention has it that the modern era of Major League Baseball begins in 1900, the essential rules of the modern game were in place by the 1893 season. That year the pitching distance was moved back to 60 feet, 6 inches, where it remains, and the pitcher's box was replaced by a rubber slab against which the pitcher was required to place his rear foot. Two other crucial rules changes had been made in recent years: In 1887, the rule awarding a hit batsman first base was instituted in the National League (this had been the rule in the American Association since 1884: first by the umpire's judgment of the impact; as of the following year, virtually automatically). In 1889, the number of balls required for a walk was reduced to four. Thus, from 1893 on, pitchers sought perfection in a game whose most important rules are the same as today, with two significant exceptions: counting a foul ball as a first or second strike, enforced by the National League as of 1901 and by the American League two years later, and the use of the designated hitter in American League games since the 1973 season.During baseball's modern era, 21 pitchers have thrown perfect games. Most were accomplished major leaguers. Seven have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: Cy Young, Addie Joss, Jim Bunning, Sandy Koufax, Catfish Hunter, Roy Halladay, and Randy Johnson. David Cone won the Cy Young once and was named to five All-Star teams. Félix Hernández is likewise a one-time Cy Young winner, as well as a six-time All-Star. Four other perfect-game throwers, Dennis Martínez, Kenny Rogers, David Wells and Mark Buehrle, each won over 200 major league games. Matt Cain, though he ended with a 104–118 record, was a three-time All-Star, played a pivotal role on two World Series–winning teams, and twice finished top ten in Cy Young voting. For a few, the perfect game was the highlight of an otherwise unremarkable career. Mike Witt and Tom Browning were solid major league pitchers; Browning was a one-time All-Star with a career record of 123–90, while Witt was a two-time All-Star, going 117–116. Larsen, Charlie Robertson, and Len Barker were journeyman pitchers—each finished his major-league career with a losing record; Barker made one All-Star team, Larsen and Robertson none. Dallas Braden retired with a 26–36 record after five seasons due to a shoulder injury. Philip Humber's perfect game was the only complete game he ever recorded, and his major league career, in which he went 16–23, ended the year after he threw it.

List of New York Yankees no-hitters

The New York Yankees are a Major League Baseball franchise based in the New York City borough of The Bronx. Also known in their early years as the "Baltimore Orioles" (1901–02) and the "New York Highlanders" (1903–12), the Yankees have had ten pitchers throw eleven no-hitters in franchise history. A no-hitter is officially recognized by Major League Baseball only "...when a pitcher (or pitchers) allows no hits during the entire course of a game, which consists of at least nine innings. In a no-hit game, a batter may reach base via a walk, an error, a hit by pitch, a passed ball or wild pitch on strike three, or catcher's interference". No-hitters of less than nine complete innings were previously recognized by the league as official; however, several rule alterations in 1991 changed the rule to its current form. A no-hitter is rare enough that the San Diego Padres have never had a pitcher accomplish the feat. Three perfect games, a special subcategory of no-hitter, have been pitched in Yankees history. As defined by Major League Baseball, "in a perfect game, no batter reaches any base during the course of the game." This feat was achieved by Don Larsen in 1956, David Wells in 1998, and David Cone in 1999. Wells later claimed he was a "little hung-over" while throwing his perfect game.Ironically, given the Yankees' celebrated history, none of the eleven pitchers who tossed no-hitters for the franchise is in the Baseball Hall of Fame.

George Mogridge threw the first no-hitter in Yankees history, beating their rival Boston Red Sox 2–1, their only no-hitter in which the opposition scored. Their most recent no-hitter was David Cone's perfect game in 1999, the seventh Yankees no-hitter thrown by a right-handed pitcher and their third perfect game. The Yankees' first perfect game was also thrown by a right-handed pitcher, Don Larsen, and came in Game 5 of the 1956 World Series. Larsen's perfect game was the only no-hitter in MLB postseason play until Roy Halladay of the Philadelphia Phillies pitched a no-hitter in Game 1 of the 2010 National League Division Series. Coincidentally, Cone's perfect game came on "Yogi Berra Day" at Yankee Stadium. Berra had caught Larsen's perfect game and both he and Larsen were in the stands for the game. Of the eleven no-hitters pitched by Yankees players, three each have been won by the scores 4–0 and 2–0, more common than any other result. The largest margin of victory in a Yankees no-hitter was 13 runs, in a 13–0 win by Monte Pearson.

Andy Hawkins lost a game on July 1, 1990 to the Chicago White Sox while on the road by the score of 4–0 without allowing a hit. Because the White Sox were winning entering the ninth inning at home, they did not bat, and thus Hawkins pitched only 8 innings, but the game was considered a no-hitter at the time. However, following rules changes in 1991, the game is no longer counted as a no-hitter. Additionally, Tom L. Hughes held the Cleveland Indians without a hit through the first nine innings of a game on August 6, 1910 but the game went into extra innings and he lost the no-hitter in the tenth inning and ultimately lost the game 5–0.The longest interval between Yankees no-hitters was between the game pitched by Larsen on October 8, 1956 and Dave Righetti's no hitter on July 4, 1983, encompassing 26 years, 8 months, and 26 days. The shortest gap between such games fell between Allie Reynolds' two no-hitters in 1951, a gap of just 2 months and 16 days from July 12 till September 28. Reynolds is the only Yankees pitcher to throw multiple no-hitters in his career, and one of only six pitchers in Major League history to throw multiple no-hitters in a season along with Max Scherzer in 2015, Roy Halladay in 2010, Nolan Ryan in 1973, Virgil Trucks in 1952, and Johnny Vander Meer in 1938. The Red Sox and the Cleveland Indians have been no-hit by the Yankees more than any other franchise, each doing so three times. Notably, Reynolds' two no-hit victims in 1951 were the Red Sox and the Indians.

The umpire is also an integral part of any no-hitter. The task of the umpire in a baseball game is to make any decision "which involves judgment, such as, but not limited to, whether a batted ball is fair or foul, whether a pitch is a strike or a ball, or whether a runner is safe or out... [the umpire's judgment on such matters] is final." Part of the duties of the umpire making calls at home plate includes defining the strike zone, which "is defined as that area over homeplate (sic) the upper limit of which is a horizontal line at the midpoint between the top of the shoulders and the top of the uniform pants, and the lower level is a line at the hollow beneath the kneecap." These calls define every baseball game and are therefore integral to the completion of any no-hitter. No umpire has called multiple Yankee no-hitters. Bill Dinneen, the umpire who called Sad Sam Jones' 1923 no-hitter, is the only person in MLB history to both pitch (for the Red Sox in 1905) and umpire (five total, including Jones') a no-hitter. The plate umpire for Larsen's perfect game, Babe Pinelli, apocryphally "retired" after that game, but that is mere legend; in reality, since Larsen's perfecto was only Game 5 of the seven-game Series, Pinelli didn't officially retire until two days later, concluding his distinguished umpiring career at second base during Game 7, not at home plate during Game 5.

List of numbers

This is a list of articles about numbers. Due to the infinitude of many sets of numbers, this list will invariably be incomplete. Hence, only particularly notable numbers will be included. Numbers may be included in the list based on their mathematical, historical or cultural notability, but all numbers have qualities which could arguably make them notable. Even the least "interesting" number is paradoxically interesting for that very property. This is known as the interesting number paradox.

The definition of what is classed as a number is rather diffuse and based on historical distinctions. For example the pair of numbers (3,4) is commonly regarded as a number when it is in the form of a complex number (3+4i), but not when it is in the form of a vector (3,4). This list will also be categorised with the standard convention of types of numbers.

This list focuses on numbers as mathematical objects and is not a list of numerals, which are linguistic devices: nouns, adjectives, or adverbs that designate numbers. The distinction is drawn between the number five (an abstract object equal to 2+3), and the numeral five (the noun referring to the number).

Paul O'Neill (baseball)

Paul Andrew O'Neill (born February 25, 1963) is a retired right fielder and Major League Baseball player, and current lead game analyst and color commentator for the New York Yankees on the YES Network. In his career, he won five World Series championships while playing for the Cincinnati Reds (1985–1992) and New York Yankees (1993–2001). In a 17-year career, O'Neill compiled 281 home runs, 1,269 runs batted in, 2,107 hits, and a lifetime batting average of .288. O'Neill won the American League batting title in 1994 with a .359 average and was a five-time All-Star in 1991, 1994, 1995, 1997 and 1998.O'Neill is the only player to have played on the winning team in three perfect games. He was in right field for the Reds for Tom Browning's perfect game in 1988. He caught the final out (a fly ball) in the Yankees' David Wells' perfect game in 1998, and he made a diving catch in right field and doubled to help the Yankees win David Cone's perfect game in 1999.After his retirement as a baseball player, O'Neill became a broadcaster on the YES Network.

Randy Wells

Randy David Wells (born August 28, 1982) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher.

The Cheap Seats (TV series)

The Cheap Seats was a television show on FOX Sports that mostly consisted of interviews with pro baseball players at home via Skype. It debuted during the 2010 Major League Baseball season with Chris Rose as its host, becoming best known for the many appearances by San Francisco Giants closer Brian Wilson, including the first on-camera showing of "The Machine". The host for 2011 was former pitcher David Wells.

The Penguin Dictionary of Curious and Interesting Numbers

The Penguin Dictionary of Curious and Interesting Numbers is a reference book for recreational mathematics and elementary number theory written by David Wells. The first edition was published in paperback by Penguin Books in 1986 in the UK, and a revised edition appeared in 1997 (ISBN 0-14-026149-4).

Tom Browning's perfect game

On September 16, 1988, Tom Browning of the Cincinnati Reds pitched the 12th perfect game in Major League Baseball history, blanking the Los Angeles Dodgers 1–0 at Riverfront Stadium. Browning threw 72 of his 100 pitches for strikes and did not run the count to three balls on a single Dodger hitter. He recorded seven strikeouts, the last of which was to the game's final batter, pinch-hitter Tracy Woodson. A two-hour, 27 minute rain delay forced the game to start at approximately 10 PM local time. The rain delay lasted longer than the game itself, played in a brisk one hour, 51 minutes.

The game's lone run came in the sixth inning. Batting against Tim Belcher, himself working on a no-hitter, Barry Larkin doubled and advanced to third on Chris Sabo's infield single; an error by Jeff Hamilton on the play enabled Larkin to score.

Browning, who became the first left-handed pitcher to pitch a perfect game since Sandy Koufax in 1965 (see Sandy Koufax's perfect game), had had another no-hitter broken up earlier in the season, against the San Diego Padres at Jack Murphy Stadium on June 6. A Tony Gwynn single with one out in the ninth foiled this bid and would be the only hit Browning allowed in defeating the Padres 12–0.

The Dodgers would go on to win the World Series—the only time, to date, that a team has won a World Series after having a perfect game pitched against it during the season. (Only one other team has since earned a postseason berth after having a perfect game pitched against it during the season: the 2010 Tampa Bay Rays, who were on the losing end of Dallas Braden's perfect game on May 9, went on to win the American League East title.) Kirk Gibson, whose walk-off home run in Game 1 of that Series helped the Dodgers defeat the Oakland Athletics 4 games to 1, was ejected by home plate umpire Jim Quick after striking out in the seventh inning of the perfect game.

The perfect game was the first of a record three Paul O'Neill would play in as a member of the winning team. As a New York Yankee, he would be on the winning end of David Wells' and David Cone's in 1998 and 1999 respectively.

On July 4 of the following season, Browning narrowly missed becoming the first pitcher to throw two perfect games. Against the Philadelphia Phillies at Veterans Stadium, his Reds leading 2–0, he retired the first 24 batters he faced before Dickie Thon broke up the bid with a leadoff double. After striking out Steve Lake, Browning gave up a single to Steve Jeltz to score Thon. John Franco then relieved Browning and got Len Dykstra to hit into a game-ending double play.

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Kenny Rogers
Perfect game pitcher
May 17, 1998
Succeeded by
David Cone
Preceded by
Francisco Córdova & Ricardo Rincón
No-hitter pitcher
May 17, 1998
Succeeded by
José Jiménez
Preceded by
Randy Johnson
Pedro Martínez
American League All-Star Game Starting pitcher
1998
2000
Succeeded by
Pedro Martínez
Roger Clemens
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