David R. Palmer

David R. Palmer (born 1941) is an American science fiction author. His works have been nominated three times for Hugo Awards. He writes as David R. Palmer.

David R. Palmer
Born1941 (age 77–78)[1]
Northern Chicago suburbs[1]
OccupationScience fiction novelist
ResidenceFlorida
NationalityUnited States
GenreScience Fiction
Notable awards1985 Compton Crook Award
Years active1981 – present

Biography

Palmer was born at Chicago[2] and studied at Highland Park High School.[3] He is married and lives in Florida,[4] where he had worked as a court reporter.

Writing career

Palmer's first novel, Emergence, won the Compton Crook Award in 1985.[5] It arose from a novella by the same title featured in the January 1981, issue of Analog. This was followed by the February 1983, Analog publication of the Seeking novella, which ultimately became part two of the novel. Thereafter the Emergence novella appeared in an anthology called Analog's Children of the Future. Both novellas also won reader's choice awards from Analog. Both were nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Novella in their respective years, and the novel for Best Novel in 1985.

A sequel to Emergence, Tracking, was serialized in three parts, beginning in the July/August 2008 issue of Analog. Tracking was continued in the September issue and concluded in the October issue of the magazine.

His second novel, Threshold (ISBN 0-553-24878-2), was published as the first book in the To Halt Armageddon trilogy[6] in 1985. The "About the Author" section of Threshold states that David is "currently working on the sequel to Threshold, also to be published by Bantam",[2] to be called Spēcial Education,[7] although it has not been published to date. He stated in the afterword to the 1990 edition of Emergence that any future writing would depend upon his finances.[8] Palmer has another completed but unpublished novel, Schrödinger's Frisbee, which is not related to either of his first two novels.

Wormhole Press has been indicated as a possible publisher for the new novels and for a reprinting of both Emergence and Threshold.[9] The author had stated on Facebook (19 Dec 2014) that cover illustrations were in production and following that Wormhole Press will move into hardcover and e-book publication.

After his works being out of print and hard to find for over a decade, Palmer later made arrangements with Eric Flint's Ring of Fire Press in 2018 to have his works reprinted starting with the reissue of Emergence in June 2018.[1]

Bibliography

Novels

  • Emergence (1984), 978-1948818063 (2018 reprint)
  • Threshold (1985), 978-1948818193 (2018 reprint)
  • Spēcial Education, (To Halt Armageddon: No. 2) forthcoming, Ring of Fire Press

Short fiction

  • "Tracking - part 1". Analog. 128 (7&8). July–August 2008.
  • "Tracking - part 2". Analog. 128 (9): 90–133. September 2008.
  • "Tracking - part 3". Analog. 128 (10): 86–133. October 2008.

References

  1. ^ a b c "David R. Palmer". Eric Flint's Ring of Fire Press.
  2. ^ a b Palmer, David R. (1985). "About the Author". Threshold. Bantam Spectra. ISBN 0-553-24878-2.
  3. ^ Michael Addison. "Highland Park High School Class Of 1959, Highland Park, IL". Hphs1959.com. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  4. ^ "Internet Book List :: Author Information: David R. Palmer". Iblist.com. Retrieved 2013-10-21.
  5. ^ "Compton Crook Award Winners". Baltimore Science Fiction Society. Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  6. ^ Palmer, David R. (November 1990) [1984]. Emergence (Signature Special ed.). Bantam Spectra. p. 297. ISBN 0-553-25519-3. Threshold (Book I of the To Halt Armageddon trilogy)
  7. ^ Palmer, David R. (November 1990) [1984]. Emergence (Signature Special ed.). Bantam Spectra. p. 297. ISBN 0-553-25519-3. I'm almost five years overdue on Book II, Spēcial Education
  8. ^ Palmer, David R. (November 1990) [1984]. Emergence (Signature Special ed.). Bantam Spectra. p. 297. ISBN 0-553-25519-3.
  9. ^ "April 2008 Amazon.com comment on Emergence by David R. Palmer". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2013-10-21.

External links

Analog's Children of the Future

Analog's Children of the Future is the third in a series of anthologies of science fiction stories drawn from Analog magazine and edited by then-current Analog editor Stanley Schmidt. It was first published in paperback by Davis Publications and hardcover by The Dial Press in December 1982.The book collects ten short pieces first published in Analog and its predecessor title Astounding, together with an introduction by Schmidt.

Balticon

Balticon is the Maryland Regional science fiction convention, sponsored by the Baltimore Science Fiction Society (BSFS). It has been held annually since 1966. The name "Balticon" is trademarked by BSFS.

Compton Crook Award

The Compton Crook Award is presented to the best first English language novel of the year in the field of Science Fiction, Fantasy, or Horror by the members of the Baltimore Science Fiction Society, Inc, at their annual Baltimore-area science fiction convention, Balticon, held on Memorial Day weekend in the Baltimore, Maryland area. Awards have been presented since 1983. The award is also known as the Compton Crook/Stephen Tall Award.BSFS has presented “The Compton Crook Award” each Balticon SM (since 1983) for “... the best first novel in the genre published during the previous year ...”. The list of eligible books is published in the monthly newsletter so all club members will have a chance to read and vote. The winning author is invited to Balticon (BSFS pays transportation and lodging to attend two years), and presented with the cash award set at $1,000.00 post 2005. Compton Crook, who used the nom de plume Stephen Tall, died in 1981. He was a long-time Baltimore resident, Towson University professor, and science fiction author.

Emergence (disambiguation)

Emergence is the process of complex pattern formation from more basic constituent parts.

Emergence (novel)

Emergence is a science fiction novel by American writer David R. Palmer. It first appeared as a novella published in Analog Science Fiction in 1981; the same magazine also published Part II, "Seeking", in 1983. The completed novel then was published by Bantam in 1984. The plot follows a precocious 11-year-old orphan girl, living in a post-apocalyptic United States. It had three printings through July 1985, and was republished in 1990 as a "Signature Special Edition" with a few minor edits and a new afterword by the author.

Emergence was Palmer's first published novel. It was developed from a pair of Hugo and Nebula award nominated novellas originally published in Analog magazine. The novel itself was nominated for a Hugo Award, a pair of Locus awards (for first novel and science fiction novel), was a finalist for a Philip K. Dick Award, and won the Compton Crook Award.Palmer's sequel to Emergence, entitled Tracking, was serialized in Analog in 2008. Wormhole Press was short-listed to release Tracking and re-release Emergence as both paperbacks and in hardcover, but by October 2010 the publisher appeared to be out of business. After the novel being out of print and hard to find for over a decade, Palmer made arrangements with Eric Flint's Ring of Fire Press in 2018 to have his works reprinted.

Fix-up

A fix-up (or fixup) is a novel created from several short fiction stories that may or may not have been initially related or previously published. The stories may be edited for consistency, and sometimes new connecting material, such as a frame story or other interstitial narration, is written for the new work. The term was coined by the science fiction writer A. E. van Vogt, who published several fix-ups of his own, including The Voyage of the Space Beagle, but the practice (if not the term) exists outside of science fiction. The use of the term in science fiction criticism was popularised by the first (1979) edition of the Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, edited by Peter Nicholls, which credited Van Vogt with the creation of the term.

The name comes from the modifications that the author needs to make in the original texts to make them fit together as though they were a novel. Foreshadowing of events from the later stories may be jammed into an early chapter of the fix-up, and character development may be interleaved throughout the book. Contradictions and inconsistencies between episodes are usually worked out.

Some fix-ups in their final form are more of a short story cycle or composite novel rather than a traditional novel with a single main plotline. Examples are Ray Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles and Isaac Asimov's I, Robot, both of which read as a series of short stories which may share plot threads and characters but which still act as self-contained stories. By contrast, van Vogt's The Weapon Shops of Isher is structured like a continuous novel although it incorporates material from three previous Van Vogt short stories.

Fix-ups became an accepted practice in American publishing during the 1950s, when science fiction and fantasy—once published primarily in magazines—began appearing increasingly in book form. Large book publishers like Doubleday and Simon & Schuster entered the market, greatly increasing demand for fiction. Authors created new manuscripts from old stories to sell to publishers. Algis Budrys in 1965 described fixups as a consequence of the lack of good supply during the "bad years for quality" of the mid-1950s, although citing The Martian Chronicles and Clifford D. Simak's City as among exceptions.

Highland Park High School (Highland Park, Illinois)

Highland Park High School (HPHS) is a public four-year high school located in Highland Park, Illinois, a North Shore suburb of Chicago, Illinois, in the United States. It is part of Township High School District 113. Prior to the 1949–50 school year, the school was known as Deerfield-Shields High School.

Hugo Award for Best Novel

The Hugo Award for Best Novel is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novel award is available for works of fiction of 40,000 words or more; awards are also given out in the short story, novelette, and novella categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".The Hugo Award for Best Novel has been awarded annually by the World Science Fiction Society since 1953, except in 1954 and 1957. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for 50, 75, or 100 years prior. Retro Hugos may only be awarded for years in which a World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, was hosted, but no awards were originally given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been given for novels for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The novels on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of stories that can be nominated. The 1953, 1955, and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up novels, but since 1959 all final candidates have been recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held in August or early September, and are held in a different city around the world each year.During the 70 nomination years, 145 authors have had works nominated; 48 of these have won, including co-authors, ties, and Retro Hugos. One translator has been noted along with the author whose works he translated. Robert A. Heinlein has received the most Hugos for Best Novel as well as the most nominations, with six wins (including two Retro Hugos) and twelve nominations. Lois McMaster Bujold has received four Hugos on ten nominations; the only other authors to win more than twice are Isaac Asimov (including one Retro Hugo), N. K. Jemisin, Connie Willis, and Vernor Vinge, who have each won three times. Nine other authors have won the award twice. The next-most nominations by a winning author are held by Robert J. Sawyer and Larry Niven, who have been nominated nine and eight times, respectively, and each have only won once, while Robert Silverberg has the greatest number of nominations without winning at nine. Three authors have won the award in consecutive years: Orson Scott Card (1986, 1987), Lois McMaster Bujold (1991, 1992), and N. K. Jemisin (2016, 2017, and 2018).

Hugo Award for Best Novella

The Hugo Award for Best Novella is one of the Hugo Awards given each year for science fiction or fantasy stories published or translated into English during the previous calendar year. The novella award is available for works of fiction of between 17,500 and 40,000 words; awards are also given out in the short story, novelette and novel categories. The Hugo Awards have been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing".The Hugo Award for Best Novella has been awarded annually since 1968. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. Retro Hugos may only be awarded for years in which a World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, was hosted, but no awards were originally given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been given for novellas for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by the supporting and attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. These novellas on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of stories that can be nominated. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year. Members are permitted to vote "no award", if they feel that none of the nominees is deserving of the award that year, and in the case that "no award" takes the majority the Hugo is not given in that category. This happened in the Best Novella category in 2015.During the 57 nomination years, 161 authors have had works nominated; 41 of these have won, including coauthors and Retro Hugos. Connie Willis has received the most Hugos for Best Novella at four, and at eight is tied for the most nominations with Robert Silverberg. Willis and Charles Stross at three out of four nominations are the only authors to have won more than twice, while thirteen other authors have won the award twice. Nancy Kress has earned seven nominations and Robert A. Heinlein, George R. R. Martin, Kim Stanley Robinson, and Lucius Shepard six, and are the only authors besides Willis and Silverberg to get more than four. Robinson has the highest number of nominations without winning.

John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer

The John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer is an award given annually to the best new writer whose first professional work of science fiction or fantasy was published within the two previous calendar years. The prize is named in honor of science fiction editor and writer John W. Campbell, whose science fiction writing and role as editor of Analog Science Fiction and Fact made him one of the most influential editors in the early history of science fiction. The award is sponsored by Dell Magazines, which publishes Analog. The nomination and selection process is administered by the World Science Fiction Society (WSFS) represented by the current Worldcon committee, and the award is presented at the Hugo Award ceremony at the Worldcon, although it is not itself a Hugo Award. All nominees receive a pin, while the winner receives a plaque. Beginning in 2005, the award has also included a tiara; created at the behest of 2004 winner Jay Lake and 2005 winner Elizabeth Bear, the tiara is passed from each year's winner to the next.Members of the current and previous Worldcon are eligible to nominate new writers for the Campbell Award under the same procedures as the Hugo Awards. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, at which point a shortlist is made of the five most-nominated writers, with additional nominees possible in the case of ties. Voting on the ballot of five nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Writers become eligible once they have a work published anywhere in the world which was sold for more than a nominal amount. While final decisions on eligibility are decided by the WSFS, the given criteria for an author to be eligible are specifically defined as someone who has had a written work in a publication which had more than 10,000 readers and which paid the writer at least 3 cents per word and a total of at least 50 US dollars.Works by winners and nominees of the Campbell Award were collected in the New Voices series of anthologies, edited by George R. R. Martin, which had five volumes covering the awards from 1973 through 1977 and which were published between 1977 and 1984. Campbell nominees and winners, such as Michael A. Burstein, who was nominated in 1996 and won in 1997, have commented that the largest effect of winning or being nominated for a Campbell is not on sales but instead that it gives credibility with established authors and publishers. Criticism has been raised about the Campbell that due to the eligibility requirements it honors writers who become well-known quickly, rather than necessarily the best or most influential authors from a historical perspective.Over the 46 years the award has been active, 195 writers have been nominated. Of these, 47 authors have won, including one tie. There have been 51 writers who were nominated twice, 17 of whom won the award in their second nomination.

List of science fiction novels

This is a list of science fiction novels, novel series, and collections of linked short stories. It includes modern novels, as well as novels written before the term "science fiction" was in common use. This list includes novels not marketed as SF but still considered to be substantially science fiction in content by some critics, such as Nineteen Eighty Four. As such, it is an inclusive list, not an exclusive list based on other factors such as level of notability or literary quality. Books are listed in alphabetical order by title, ignoring the leading articles "A", "An", and "The". Novel series are alphabetical by author-designated name or, if there is none, the title of the first novel in the series or some other reasonable designation.

Long baseline acoustic positioning system

A long baseline (LBL) acoustic positioning system is one of three broad classes of underwater acoustic positioning systems that are used to track underwater vehicles and divers. The other two classes are ultra short baseline systems (USBL) and short baseline systems (SBL). LBL systems are unique in that they use networks of sea-floor mounted baseline transponders as reference points for navigation. These are generally deployed around the perimeter of a work site. The LBL technique results in very high positioning accuracy and position stability that is independent of water depth. It is generally better than 1-meter and can reach a few centimeters accuracy. LBL systems are generally employed for precision underwater survey work where the accuracy or position stability of ship-based (SBL, USBL) positioning systems does not suffice.

Philip K. Dick Award

The Philip K. Dick Award is a science fiction award given annually at Norwescon and sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society and (since 2005) the Philip K. Dick Trust. Named after science fiction and fantasy writer Philip K. Dick, it has been awarded since 1983, the year after his death. It is awarded to the best original paperback published each year in the US.The award was founded by Thomas Disch with assistance from David G. Hartwell, Paul S. Williams, and Charles N. Brown. As of 2016, it is administered by Gordon Van Gelder. Past administrators include Algis Budrys, David G. Hartwell, and David Alexander Smith.

Surface energy

Surface free energy or interfacial free energy, quantifies the disruption of intermolecular bonds that occurs when a surface is created. In the physics of solids, surfaces must be intrinsically less energetically favorable than the bulk of a material (the molecules on the surface have more energy compared with the molecules in the bulk of the material), otherwise there would be a driving force for surfaces to be created, removing the bulk of the material (see sublimation). The surface energy may therefore be defined as the excess energy at the surface of a material compared to the bulk, or it is the work required to build an area of a particular surface. Another way to view the surface energy is to relate it to the work required to cut a bulk sample, creating two surfaces.

Cutting a solid body into pieces disrupts its bonds, and therefore increases free energy. If the cutting is done reversibly, then conservation of energy means that the energy consumed by the cutting process will be equal to the energy inherent in the two new surfaces created. The unit surface energy of a material would therefore be half of its energy of cohesion, all other things being equal; in practice, this is true only for a surface freshly prepared in vacuum. Surfaces often change their form away from the simple "cleaved bond" model just implied above. They are found to be highly dynamic regions, which readily rearrange or react, so that energy is often reduced by such processes as passivation or adsorption.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 11

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #11 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by Terry Carr, the eleventh volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Pocket Books in July 1982, and in hardcover by Gollancz in the same year.

The book collects seventeen novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction, notes and concluding essays by Carr and Charles N. Brown. The stories were previously published in 1981 in the magazines Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Omni, and Science Fiction Digest, the collection A Rhapsody in Amber, and the anthologies Universe 11 and New Dimensions 12.

Threshold (Palmer novel)

Threshold is a science fiction novel by American writer David R. Palmer, published by Bantam Spectra in December 1985. It was his second book published, following Emergence, and was intended to be the first book of the To Halt Armageddon trilogy.

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.