David Normington

Sir David John Normington, GCB (born 18 October 1951)[1] is a retired British civil servant. He served as the Permanent Secretary of the Department for Education and Skills from 2001 to 2005, and then of the Home Office until 2011. From 2011 until 2016 he served as both the First Civil Service Commissioner and the Commissioner for Public Appointments for the British government.[2]

David Normington - Permanent Secretary
David Normington

Career

A graduate of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, Sir David's career began in the Department of Employment. There he was responsible variously for the previous Government’s programme of trade union reform, for measures to reduce unemployment, and for youth training. He was Principal Private Secretary to Tom King, Secretary of State for Employment in 1983 and 1984. He was also responsible for co-ordinating the efforts of central Government to regenerate the seven most deprived London boroughs.

In 1995, when the Department of Employment and Department of Education merged, he played a central role in the creation of the new Department for Education and Employment (DfEE). From there he moved on to become DfEE’s Director-General for Strategy and Analytical Services and for the International Division in the run-up to the UK Presidency of the European Union. In 1998, Normington became the Director-General for Schools, bringing together responsibility for all schools policy and operations. He became Permanent Secretary in 2001 where he served for five years until joining the Home Office as its Permanent Secretary in January 2006.[3] His performance at the Home Office was strongly criticised by Home Secretary John Reid, who described the department as "Not fit for purpose".[4]

He has been called "something more akin to James Bond than a top civil servant,[5] and his nickname in his previous appointment as permanent secretary at the Department for Education and Skills was ‘the smiling assassin’[6] He is also described as ‘extremely charming’, ‘civilised and urbane’ – and a ‘tough nut'.[5] One of Normington's lasting legacies in the DfES was his decision to reduce the Department's workforce by approximately a third, made in 2003. This decision came in advance of the subsequent budget announcing a large reduction of the civil service as a whole, leading some to speculate that Normington had made his own cuts early in an attempt to curry favour. He applied for the job of Cabinet Secretary but was beaten by Sir Gus O'Donnell, due to concerns that his appointment would dangerously damage Civil Service morale.[7]

Normington was appointed a Commander of the Order of the Bath (CB) in the 2000 New Year Honours,[8] promoted to Knight Commander of the same Order (KCB) in the 2005 New Year Honours,[9] and promoted again to Knight Grand Cross of that Order (GCB) in the 2011 New Year Honours.[10] In 2010 it was announced that he would retire from the Civil Service and become the First Civil Service Commissioner and Commissioner for Public Appointments, the first time the two roles had been combined.

The arrest of opposition MP Damian Green

He was responsible for initiating the investigation that ended with the police arresting shadow immigration minister Damian Green, allegedly because Green told the press that the government had given licenses to illegal workers, that an illegal worker was employed in the Houses of Parliament, and two more documents.[11]

The complaint was dismissed by the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), [12] after MP's concluded "that growing frustration in both the Home Office and the Cabinet Office may have led officials to give an exaggerated impression of the damage done by the leaks that could reasonably be presumed to have emanated from the Home Office" .[13]

Scam Alert

Illegitimate and unauthorised attempts have allegedly been made to exploit Sir David Normington's reputation by improperly using his name to sponsor or lend credibility to entry clearance and visa applications by foreign nationals seeking to come to the United Kingdom. [14]

References

  1. ^ "Birthdays". The Guardian. Guardian News & Media. 18 October 2014. p. 57.
  2. ^ "dual Civil Service Commissioner and Commissioner for Public Appointments". UK Cabinet Office. 21 December 2010. Retrieved 3 March 2011.
  3. ^ Stevenson, Alexander (2013). The Public Sector: Managing The Unmanageable. ISBN 978-0-7494-6777-7.
  4. ^ "Immigration system unfit - Reid". BBC News. 23 May 2006.
  5. ^ a b McHale, Maria (22 September 2005). "The names Normington, by Maria McHale". Retrieved 11 September 2015.
  6. ^ Prince, Rosa (28 November 2008). "Sir David Normington: A profile". The Daily Telegraph. London.
  7. ^ McHale, Maria (23 September 2005). "Public Finance Magazine". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 1 April 2006.
  8. ^ "No. 55710". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 1999. p. 3.
  9. ^ "No. 57509". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 2004. p. 2.
  10. ^ "No. 59647". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 December 2010. p. 2.
  11. ^ "Cross-party fury over MP's arrest". BBC News. 28 November 2008. Retrieved 16 April 2009.
  12. ^ "In full: CPS Green statement". BBC News. 16 April 2009. Retrieved 16 April 2009.
  13. ^ "Leaks 'exaggerated' in MP arrest". BBC News. 16 April 2009. Retrieved 16 April 2009.
  14. ^ "Visa application scam exposed". Home Office UK Border Agency. 15 September 2011. Archived from the original on 24 November 2011. Retrieved 2011-09-23.
Government offices
Preceded by
Sir Michael Bichard
Permanent Secretary of the
Department for Education and Skills

2001–2005
Succeeded by
Sir David Bell
Preceded by
Sir John Gieve
Permanent Secretary of the
Home Office

2005–2011
Succeeded by
Dame Helen Ghosh
Preceded by
Dame Janet Paraskeva
First Civil Service Commissioner
1 April 2011 – 1 April 2016
Succeeded by
Kathryn Bishop (interim)
Preceded by
Dame Janet Gaymer
Commissioner for Public Appointments
1 April 2011 – 1 April 2016
Succeeded by
Peter Riddell
2011 New Year Honours

The New Year Honours 2011 were announced on 31 December 2010 in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, The Cook Islands Grenada, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, Saint Christopher and Nevis, to celebrate the year passed and mark the beginning of 2011

The recipients of honours are displayed as they were styled before their new honour and arranged by the country (in order of independence) whose ministers advised The Queen on the appointments, then by honour with grades i.e. Knight/Dame Grand Cross, Knight/Dame Commander etc. and then divisions i.e. Civil, Diplomatic and Military as appropriate.

Civil Service Commission (United Kingdom)

The Civil Service Commission regulates recruitment to the United Kingdom Civil Service, providing assurance that appointments are on merit after fair and open competition, and hears appeals under the Civil Service Code. The Commission is independent of Government and the Civil Service.

The Civil Service Commission was established by Gladstone through an order in council on 21 May 1855 following publication of the Northcote–Trevelyan Report by Charles Trevelyan and Stafford Northcote that advocated the decoupling of appointments of senior civil servants from ministers to insure the impartiality of the Civil Service.Following a report of the Committee on Standards in Public Life, "Defining the Boundaries within the Executive: Ministers, special advisers and the permanent Civil Service" in 2003, the appointment of the First Civil Service Commissioner is made by Government after consultation with the leaders of the main opposition parties. They are then appointed by the Queen under Royal Prerogative. The First Civil Service Commissioner is appointed for a fixed term of five years, although another Commissioner may act as an interim First Commissioner when necessary.

Commissioner for Public Appointments

The Commissioner for Public Appointments is a British public servant, appointed by The Queen, whose primary role is to provide independent assurance that ministerial public appointments across the United Kingdom by HM Government Ministers (and devolved appointments by Welsh Government Ministers) are made in accordance with the Principles of Public Appointments and the Cabinet Office's Governance Code on Public Appointments. The Commissioner issues an annual report and a statistical bulletin each year.

There are similar bodies for two other jurisdictions of the United Kingdom – the Commissioner for Ethical Standards in Public Life in Scotland and the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments for Northern Ireland.

As of April 2016, the current Commissioner for Public Appointments is Peter Riddell.

David Bell (university administrator)

Sir David Robert Bell KCB (born March 1959 in Glasgow) is a public policy analyst who is Vice-Chancellor and Chief Executive of the University of Sunderland. He was previously Vice-Chancellor of the University of Reading for 6 years. Prior to that, he was Permanent Secretary at the Department for Education and its predecessor departments from 3 January 2006 until 2012. Before that he was Chief Inspector of Schools at the Office for Standards in Education from 2002.

Department for Education and Skills (United Kingdom)

The Department for Education and Skills (DfES) was a United Kingdom government department between 2001 and 2007, responsible for the education system (including higher education and adult learning) as well as children's services in England.

The department was led by Secretary of State for Education and Skills.

The DfES had offices at four main locations: London (both at the Sanctuary Buildings and Caxton House), Sheffield (Moorfoot), Darlington (Mowden Hall), and Runcorn (Castle View House). The DfES was also represented in regional Government Offices.

The DfES had jurisdiction only in England as education was the responsibility of the Scottish Government, Welsh Assembly Government and the Northern Ireland Assembly.

On 28 June 2007, the DfES was split up into the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and the Department for Innovation, Universities and Skills. The DCSF was later reorganised as the Department for Education in 2010.

First Civil Service Commissioner

The First Civil Service Commissioner heads the Office of Civil Service Commissioners, which ensures that the Civil Service in the United Kingdom is effective and impartial and that appointments are made on merit, and hears appeals under the Civil Service Code.

The post was created in 1855 following publication of the Northcote–Trevelyan Report by Charles Trevelyan and Stafford Northcote that advocated the decoupling of appointments of senior civil servants from ministers to insure the impartiality of the Civil Service. Following a report of the Committee on Standards in Public Life, "Defining the Boundaries within the Executive: Ministers, special advisers and the permanent Civil Service" in 2003, the appointment of the First Civil Service Commissioner is made by Government after consultation with the leaders of the main opposition parties. They are then appointed by the Queen under Royal Prerogative.

Helen Ghosh

Dame Helen Frances Ghosh, DCB (/ɡəʊst/; GOST; born 21 February 1956) is a British civil servant who has been Master of Balliol College, Oxford since 2018. She was formerly Director-General of the National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, following her career as British civil servant, where until November 2012 was Permanent Secretary at the Home Office and was previously at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) until the end of 2010. On appointment at DEFRA, she was the only female permanent secretary to head a major department of the British Government. From April 2018, she is Master of Balliol College, Oxford.

Ian Watmore

Ian Charles Watmore (born 5 July 1958) is a British management consultant and former senior civil servant under three prime ministers, serving from October 2016 as the First Civil Service Commissioner.

John Gieve

Sir Edward John Watson Gieve, KCB (born 20 February 1950) is a former British civil servant, who served as Deputy Governor for Financial Stability of the Bank of England and an ex officio member of the Monetary Policy Committee from 2006 to 2009.

List of Corpus Christi College, Oxford people

This is a list of notable people affiliated with Corpus Christi College, University of Oxford, England. It includes former students, current and former academics and fellows. This list of alumni consists almost entirely of men, because women were not allowed to study at the college from its foundation in 1517 until 1979.

List of permanent under secretaries of state of the Home Office

This is a list of permanent under secretaries of state of the Home Office of the United Kingdom.

Sir Philip Rutnam 2017-present

Sir Mark Sedwill 2013– 2017

Helen Kilpatrick 2012–2013 (acting)

Dame Helen Ghosh 2011–2012

Sir David Normington 2006–2010

Sir John Gieve 2002–2006

Sir David Omand 1997–2002

Sir Richard Wilson 1994–1997

Sir Clive Whitmore 1988–1994

Sir Brian Cubbon 1979–1988

Sir Robert Armstrong 1977–1979

Sir Arthur Peterson 1972–1977

Sir Philip Allen 1966–1972

Sir Charles Cunningham 1957–1966

Sir Frank Newsam 1948–1957

Sir Alexander Maxwell 1938–1948

Sir Russell Scott 1932–1938

Sir John Anderson 1922–1932

Sir Edward Troup 1908–1922

Sir Mackenzie Dalzell Chalmers 1903–1908

Sir Kenelm Digby 1895–1903

Sir Godfrey Lushington 1885–1895#

Hon Sir Adolphus Liddell 1867–1885

Horatio Waddington 1848–1867

Samuel March Phillips 1827–1848

Henry Hobhouse 1817–27

John Beckett [later Sir John Beckett, Bart.] 1806–1817

John King 1792

Scrope Barnard 1789

Michael Bichard, Baron Bichard

Michael George Bichard, Baron Bichard, KCB, (born 31 January 1947) is a former public servant in the United Kingdom, first in local and then as a civil servant in central government. He was Director of the Institute for Government, currently serves as one of its first fellows, and was Chair of the Design Council. He was a created a crossbench life peer on 24 March 2010. He is an advisor to The Key Support Services Limited, which provide leadership and management support to school leaders and governors. He became Chair of the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) in 2013.

Normington

Normington may refer to:

Wynn Normington Hugh-Jones (born 1923), former British diplomat, administrator and Liberal Party official

David Normington, the First Civil Service Commissioner and Commissioner for Public Appointments for the British government

Grant Normington (born 1990), English footballer who is currently playing for Non-League side Hall Road Rangers

John Normington (1937–2007), English actor who appeared widely on British television from the 1960s until the year of his death

October 18

October 18 is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 74 days remain until the end of the year.

Order of the Bath

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath (formerly the Most Honourable Military Order of the Bath) is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for appointing a knight, which involved bathing (as a symbol of purification) as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as "Knights of the Bath". George I "erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order". He did not (as is commonly believed) revive the Order of the Bath, since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.The Order consists of the Sovereign (currently Queen Elizabeth II), the Great Master (currently Charles, Prince of Wales, and three Classes of members:

Knight Grand Cross (GCB) or Dame Grand Cross (GCB)

Knight Commander (KCB) or Dame Commander (DCB)

Companion (CB)Members belong to either the Civil or the Military Division. Prior to 1815, the order had only a single class, Knight Companion (KB), which no longer exists. Recipients of the Order are now usually senior military officers or senior civil servants. Commonwealth citizens who are not subjects of the Queen and foreign nationals may be made Honorary Members.The Order of the Bath is the fourth-most senior of the British Orders of Chivalry, after The Most Noble Order of the Garter, The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle, and The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick (dormant).

Peter Riddell

The Rt Hon Peter John Robert Riddell CBE (born 14 October 1948) is a British journalist, author. He is currently serving as the British government's Commissioner for Public Appointments, and is the out-going director of the Institute for Government.

Police Federation of England and Wales

The Police Federation of England and Wales (PFEW) is the statutory staff association for police Constables, Sergeants, Inspectors and Chief Inspectors in the 43 territorial police forces in England and Wales. Under UK labour law, the police are prohibited from joining ordinary trade unions to defend pay and working conditions, by the Police Act 1996, because of the view that a police strike would pose an exceptional public safety risk. The PFEW was originally established by the Police Act 1919 as an alternative system, which would serve to represent staff, and where disputes could be resolved through arbitration so long as the government (as employer) continued to bargain in good faith.

There were approximately 124,000 members in 2014. Members can elect not to pay subscriptions and thereby not receive the legal representation and other benefits that paying members receive, but they still continue officially to be members of the Federation. In reality only a very few officers have ever decided not to pay their full subscription dues. Superintendents and Chief superintendents are represented by a separate staff association, the Police Superintendents' Association of England and Wales (PSA), while the most senior officers are members of the Chief Police Officers Staff Association (CPOSA).

Sara Nathan (broadcaster)

Sara Catherine Nathan (born 16 February 1956) is a former British broadcaster who now sits on the boards of a number of public bodies.

Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department

This article lists past and present Under-Secretaries of State serving the Home Secretary of the United Kingdom.

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