David Hurley

General David John Hurley, AC, DSC, FTSE (born 26 August 1953) is a former senior officer in the Australian Army and the 27th Governor-General of Australia, in office since 1 July 2019. He was previously the 38th Governor of New South Wales, serving from 2014 to 2019.

In a 42-year military career, Hurley deployed on Operation Solace in Somalia in 1993, commanded the 1st Brigade (1999–2000), was the inaugural Chief of Capability Development Group (2003–2007) and Chief of Joint Operations (2007–2008), and served as Vice Chief of the Defence Force (2008–2011). His career culminated with his appointment as Chief of the Defence Force on 4 July 2011, in succession to Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston.[1] Hurley retired from the army in June 2014, and succeeded Dame Marie Bashir as Governor of New South Wales on 2 October 2014.


David Hurley

David Hurley official photo
27th Governor-General of Australia
Assumed office
1 July 2019
MonarchElizabeth II
Prime MinisterScott Morrison
Preceded bySir Peter Cosgrove
38th Governor of New South Wales
In office
2 October 2014 – 1 May 2019
MonarchElizabeth II
PremierMike Baird
Gladys Berejiklian
LieutenantTom Bathurst
Preceded byDame Marie Bashir
Succeeded byMargaret Beazley
Personal details
Born26 August 1953 (age 65)
Wollongong, New South Wales
NationalityAustralian
Spouse(s)
Linda McMartin (m. 1977)
Children3
Military service
AllegianceAustralia
Branch/serviceAustralian Army
Years of service1972–2014
RankGeneral
CommandsChief of the Defence Force (2011–2014)
Vice Chief of the Defence Force (2008–2011)
Chief of Joint Operations (2007–2008)
Chief of Capability Development Group (2003–2007)
Land Commander Australia (2002–2003)
1st Brigade (1999–2000)
1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (1991–1993)
Battles/warsOperation Solace
AwardsCompanion of the Order of Australia
Distinguished Service Cross
Knight of the Order of Saint John

Early life and education

David and Linda Hurley portrait
Hurley, with his wife Linda

David John Hurley was born on 26 August 1953 in Wollongong, New South Wales, to Norma and James Hurley.[2] His father was an Illawarra steelworker and his mother worked in a grocery store. Hurley grew up in Port Kembla and attended Port Kembla High School, where he completed his Higher School Certificate in 1971. He subsequently graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon with a Bachelor of Arts and Graduate Diploma in Defence Studies.[3]

Hurley is married to Linda (née McMartin), and has three children.[4]

Military career

Hurley entered the Royal Military College, Duntroon, as an officer cadet in January 1972.[5] On graduating from Duntroon in December 1975, he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Royal Australian Infantry Corps. His initial posting was to the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (1RAR). Promoted to captain, he was appointed adjutant of the Sydney University Regiment before becoming regimental adjutant of the Royal Australian Regiment. He went on exchange to the 1st Battalion, Irish Guards, a British Army unit, before serving with 5th/7th Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment.[4]

Promoted to lieutenant colonel, Hurley was posted as the Senior Career Adviser (Armour, Artillery, Engineers and Infantry) in the Office of the Military Secretary in 1990, appointed SO1 (Operations) Headquarters 2nd Division in early 1991, and in November 1991 assumed command of 1RAR, which he led during Operation Solace in Somalia in 1993. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross for his service during this deployment.[6] In 1994 he became SO1 (Operations), Headquarters 1st Division.[7]

Following promotion to colonel, Hurley was appointed Chief of Staff, Headquarters 1st Division in June 1994, attended the United States Army War College from 1996 to 1997, became Military Secretary to Chief of Army, and was posted to Australian Defence Headquarters as Director of Preparedness and Mobilisation in December 1997.[8] As a brigadier, he assumed command of the 1st Brigade in Darwin in January 1999. During this period he oversaw the brigade's transition to a higher degree of operational readiness and its support to Australian–led operations in East Timor. He went on to be Director General Land Development within Capability Systems in January 2001.[7]

Hurley was promoted to major general in 2001 and served as Head Capability Systems Division from July 2001, and as Land Commander Australia from December 2002.[7] Promoted to lieutenant general, he assumed the new appointment of Chief of Capability Development Group in December 2003, went on to take the newly separated appointment of Chief of Joint Operations in September 2007, and became Vice Chief of the Defence Force in July 2008.[9]

Hurley was promoted to general and succeeded Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston as Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) on 4 July 2011.[1] In January 2012 Hurley completed 40 years service to the Australian Defence Force,[5] and on 20 January while in Paris, he was presented with the insignia for Officer of the Legion of Honour by the French CDF.[10] In February, he was presented with a fifth clasp to the Defence Force Service Medal in recognition of his 40 years of service.[5] Hurley retired from the Australian Army on 30 June 2014, and was succeeded as CDF by Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin.[11]

Lieutenant General David Morrison, the 2016 Australian of the Year, credited Hurley with the phrase "the standard you walk past is the standard you accept" in his anti-misogyny speech, which became "one of the most quoted phrases" of Morrison's speech.[12]

Vice-regal appointments

David Hurley swearing-in
Hurley at his swearing-in ceremony as the 27th Governor-General of Australia

On 5 June 2014, New South Wales Premier Mike Baird announced that Hurley would replace Dame Marie Bashir as Governor of New South Wales: he was sworn in on 2 October 2014 after Bashir's term as governor had expired.[13] On 17 March 2015, he was invested as a Knight of the Order of St John (a British honour) by the Lord Prior of the Order, Neil Conn, at a ceremony at Government House, Sydney.[14]

On 16 December 2018, Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced that Hurley would become the next Governor-General of Australia commencing on 1 July 2019.[15][16][17] Margaret Beazley was designated as his replacement as Governor of New South Wales.[18] Hurley was sworn in as the 27th Governor-General at Parliament House, Canberra, on 1 July 2019. His first words were spoken in the language of the local Aboriginal people.[19]

Hurley is an Honorary Patron of the ACT Veterans Rugby Club and Patron of Transport Heritage NSW.[20][21]

Titles, styles and honours

Titles

Hurley's style and title in full from 1 July 2019 is: His Excellency General The Honourable David John Hurley, Principal Companion and Chancellor of the Order of Australia, Distinguished Service Cross, Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia.

Honours and awards

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon
DSC (Australia) ribbon

Order of Australia (Military) ribbon
DSC (Australia) ribbon

Order of St John (UK) ribbon
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon
Australian Service Medal ribbon
DFSM with Fed Star

Order of St John (UK) ribbon
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon
Australian Service Medal ribbon
DFSM with Fed Star

Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon
Order of Military Service (BAT)

Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon
Order of Military Service (BAT)

Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya
Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon
Order of the Crown of Thailand - Medal (Thailand) ribbon
Decoration of Merit

Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya
Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon
Order of the Crown of Thailand - Medal (Thailand) ribbon
Decoration of Merit
Order of Australia (Military) ribbon.png Companion of the Order of Australia (AC) 26 January 2010[22]
Officer of the Order of Australia (AO) 26 January 2004[23]
DSC (Australia) ribbon.png Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) 26 November 1993[6]
Order of St John (UK) ribbon.png Knight of Justice of the Order of St John 30 July 2019[14]
Australian Active Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Active Service Medal with SOMALIA clasp[24]
Australian Service Medal ribbon.png Australian Service Medal [24]
DFSM with Fed Star.png Defence Force Service Medal with the Federation Star 40–44 years service[5]
Australian Defence Medal (Australia) ribbon.png Australian Defence Medal [24]
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg Officer of the Legion of Honour (France) 20 January 2012[10][25]
US Legion of Merit Commander ribbon.png Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States) 10 May 2012[26]
Order of Military Service (BAT).gif Knight Grand Commander of the Order of Military Service (Malaysia) 2012[27]
Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya.jpg Defence Meritorious Service Star – 1st Class[28] (Indonesia) 19 November 2012[25][29][30]
Darjah Utama Bakti Cemerlang (Tentera) ribbon.png Distinguished Service Order (Singapore) 13 February 2013[25][31]
Order of the Crown of Thailand - Medal (Thailand) ribbon.svg Gold Medal of the Order of the Crown of Thailand (Thailand) June 2014[25]
Decoration of Merit.jpg Gold Decoration of Merit (Netherlands) June 2014[25]
Badges

Honorary degrees

Honorary appointments

References

  1. ^ a b Massola, James (1 June 2011). "David Hurley is made new defence force chief as part of sweeping renewal of top brass". The Australian. News Limited. Retrieved 9 June 2011.
  2. ^ "The Governor-General's biography". Office of the Governor-General. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  3. ^ "General David Hurley". Lowy Institute. Retrieved 30 July 2018.
  4. ^ a b "General David Hurley, AC, DSC". Biography. Department of Defence, Australian Government. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d Army News, February 2012, www.defence.gov.au
  6. ^ a b It's an Honour – Distinguished Service Cross (Australian) – 26 November 1993
  7. ^ a b c Defence Keynote Address to SimTecT2006 Archived 21 March 2012 at the Wayback Machine, LTGEN General David Hurley, 29 May 2006, Melbourne Convention Centre, www.siaa.asn.au
  8. ^ List of Witnesses at Public Hearings, Parliament House Canberra, 16 April 1998, www.aph.gov.au
  9. ^ Hackett Centenary Lectures, King's College London, 12 November 2010, www.kcl.ac.uk
  10. ^ a b "French Embassy in Australia – Officer of the Legion of Honour – 20 January 2012".
  11. ^ "Chief of Defence Force change of command". Defence Media Release. Department of Defence. Archived from the original on 11 August 2014. Retrieved 30 June 2014.
  12. ^ Aubusson, Kate (2 February 2016). "David Morrison defends Australian of the Year honour on Q&A". The Age. Retrieved 2 February 2016.
  13. ^ "General Hurley named as NSW Governor". Sky News. 5 June 2014. Archived from the original on 6 June 2014. Retrieved 5 June 2014.
  14. ^ a b "Governor's Program – 17 March 2015". Governor of New South Wales. 17 March 2015. Retrieved 20 March 2015.
  15. ^ "Scott Morrison picks former general David Hurley to be Australia's next governor-general". Sydney Morning Herald. 16 December 2018. Retrieved 15 December 2018.
  16. ^ "Australia's New Governor-General". Prime Minister of Australia. 16 December 2018. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  17. ^ Karp, Paul; Cox, Lisa (16 December 2018). "David Hurley named next governor general of Australia as Labor blasts timing". The Guardian. Retrieved 16 December 2018.
  18. ^ Berejiklian, Gladys (13 January 2019). "Appointment of The Honourable Justice Margaret Beazley QC AO as Governor" (Press release). Government of New South Wales. Retrieved 2 March 2019.
  19. ^ Remeikis, Amy (1 July 2019). "General David Hurley sworn in as Australia's 27th governor general – politics live". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  20. ^ "Patronage Listing". Governor of New South Wales. Retrieved 20 June 2018.
  21. ^ "ACT Veterans Rugby". Archived from the original on 23 June 2014.
  22. ^ It's an Honour – Companion of the Order of Australia – 26 January 2010
    Citation: For eminent service to the Australian Defence Force as Chief of Capability Development Group, Chief of Joint Operations and Vice Chief of the Defence Force.
  23. ^ It's an Honour – Officer of the Order of Australia – 26 January 2004
    Citation: For distinguished service, leadership and management to the Australian Defence Force in senior command and staff appointments.
  24. ^ a b c Official High Resolution Photo, July 2011, www.defence.gov.au
  25. ^ a b c d e Raymond Griggs (24 June 2014). "David Hurley last night promoted VADM Tim Barrett who will next week succeed me as CN Australia". Retrieved 25 June 2014.
  26. ^ "General David Hurley AC DSC". University of Wollongong. Retrieved 2 August 2018.
  27. ^ ABC News, General Hurley 'pleased' accusations against General Campbell were withdrawn retrieved 16 December 2018
  28. ^ Bintang Yudha Dharma Utama is also translated as "The Grand Meritorious Military Order – 1st Class" – Chief of Defence Force receives Indonesia's highest military award, AsiaOne, 2 May 2012
  29. ^ Defence News – Defence Meritorious Service Star – 19 November 2012
  30. ^ The ribbon displayed is for Bintang Yudha Dharma Nararya (Defence Meritorious Service Star – 3rd Class). The ribbon for the Bintang Yudha Dharma Utama (Defence Meritorious Service Star – 1st Class) is the same, but with the addition of two central narrow red stripes. Bintang Yudha Dharma, Sekretariat Negara Republik Indonesia Official Website, www.setneg.go.id
  31. ^ Top military award conferred on Australian Chief of the Defence Force – Top military award conferred on Australian Chief of the Defence Force, Australian High Commission, Singapore, 13 February 2013
  32. ^ "Honorary Doctorate Recipients – General David Hurley AC DSC". University of Wollongong. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  33. ^ Offner, Steve (11 December 2015). "Houston, Hurley receive honorary doctorates". University of New South Wales. UNSW Newsroom. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  34. ^ "AUTUMN GRADUATION SEASON COMMENCES WITH HONORARY DOCTORATE AWARDED". Newsroom. Macquarie University. 18 April 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  35. ^ "Vice-regal Program – Tuesday, 30 January 2018". Governor of New South Wales. Office of the Governor. 30 January 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  36. ^ a b "Patronage Listing". Governor of New South Wales. Office of the Governor. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  37. ^ "Vice-regal Program – Thursday, 2 March 2017". Governor of New South Wales. Office of the Governor. 2 March 2017. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  38. ^ "Understanding the Most Venerable Order of St John" (PDF). Governor of New South Wales. Governor of New South Wales. 12 December 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  39. ^ "Understanding the Most Venerable Order of St John" (PDF). St John South Australia. St John South Australia. 12 December 2014. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  40. ^ "Review the Attestation Parade for Class 323". Saint John South Australia. Saint John South Australia. 2012. Retrieved 24 August 2018.
  41. ^ "25 NEW ATSE FELLOWS INCLUDE SEVEN WOMEN". ATSE. Australian Academy of Technology and Engineering. 26 October 2016. Retrieved 7 March 2018.

External links

Military offices
Preceded by
Major General Peter Abigail
Land Commander Australia
2002–2003
Succeeded by
Major General Ken Gillespie
New title Chief Capability Development Group
2003–2007
Succeeded by
Vice Admiral Matt Tripovich
New title
Separated from the roles of VCDF
Chief of Joint Operations
2007–2008
Succeeded by
Lieutenant General Mark Evans
Preceded by
Lieutenant General Ken Gillespie
Vice Chief of the Defence Force
2008–2011
Succeeded by
Air Marshal Mark Binskin
Preceded by
Air Chief Marshal Angus Houston
Chief of the Defence Force
2011–2014
Succeeded by
Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin
Government offices
Preceded by
Dame Marie Bashir
Governor of New South Wales
2014–2019
Succeeded by
Margaret Beazley
Preceded by
Sir Peter Cosgrove
Governor-General of Australia
2019–present
Incumbent
2019 in Australia

The following lists events that happened during 2019 in Australia.

46th Parliament of Australia

The 46th Parliament of Australia is a meeting of the legislative branch of the Australian federal government, composed of the Australian Senate and the Australian House of Representatives. The parliament was opened on 2 July 2019.

Astra (band)

Astra is a rock band from San Diego, California. Their sound is in the style of the 1970s progressive rock and psychedelic rock, and includes a variety of synthesizers, mellotron and long jams.

Chief of Joint Operations (Australia)

The Chief of Joint Operations (CJOPS) is a three-star role within the Australian Defence Force (ADF), responsible the Joint Operations Command and joint operational deployments, such as United Nations peacekeeping and joint task groups. Until 2007, the Vice Chief of the Defence Force (VCDF) was double hatted, additionally exercising the responsibilities of CJOPS. However, in September 2007 the Minister of Defence, Brendan Nelson announced the formation of a separate CJOPS position based at the Headquarters Joint Operations Command (HQJOC) at Bungendore, New South Wales.

Chief of the Defence Force (Australia)

The Chief of the Defence Force (CDF) is the professional head of the Australian Defence Force (ADF) and the most senior uniformed military adviser to the Minister for Defence. The current Chief of the Defence Force is General Angus Campbell, who took office on 6 July 2018.

David Hurley (singer)

David Hurley (born August 1962) is a British countertenor who sang with The King's Singers from 1990 to 2016. Hurley became a mainstay in the British countertenor scene shortly after becoming a King's Singer. Hurley sang countertenor with the likes of Alastair Hume, Nigel Short, Robin Tyson and Timothy Wayne-Wright. As well as with these countertenors, he sang with Bob Chilcott, Paul Phoenix, Julian Gregory, Bruce Russell, Philip Lawson, Chris Bruerton, Christopher Gabbitas, Gabriel Crouch, Stephen Connolly and Jonathan Howard.

Hurley recorded, along with Tyson, Phoenix, Lawson, Gabbitas and Connolly, the 40-part piece Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis (2006), as well as the Grammy Award winning album "Simple Gifts" (2008).

Duncan Spender

Duncan Peter James Spender (born 18 June 1975) is an Australian politician, who was a founding member of the Liberal Democratic Party in 2001. In March 2019, he was appointed to the Australian Senate, replacing LDP senator David Leyonhjelm who resigned to contest the Legislative Council at the 2019 New South Wales state election.

Before his appointment, Spender worked as Leyonhjelm's chief of staff and senior adviser, and as the party's treasurer. As the Parliament of New South Wales was dissolved for the election, Spender's appointment was made by the Governor, David Hurley, with the appointment to be endorsed by the parliament in its next session. This occurred on 8 May 2019.Spender's seat was for a term that ended on 30 June 2019. He sat in the Senate for just two days, and Senate Estimates for two days. He was a candidate at the 2019 Australian federal election, but did not get elected.Spender was born in Brisbane. He is the son of former Federal Court (and Industrial Court) judge, Jeffrey Spender.

First Berejiklian ministry

The First Berejiklian ministry was the 96th ministry of the Government of New South Wales, and was led by Gladys Berejiklian, the state's 45th Premier.

The Liberal–National coalition ministry was formed on 23 January 2017, immediately following the resignation of the previous Premier, Mike Baird. Berejiklian and Nationals leader, John Barilaro, were sworn in at Government House, Sydney by Governor David Hurley on the same day.On 29 January, Premier Berejiklian announced a reorganisation of the ministry, with the full ministry sworn in by the Governor on 30 January 2017.The ministry covered the period from 23 January 2017 until 23 March 2019 when the 2019 state election was held, resulting in the re-election of the Coalition; with Berejiklian as leader and the Second Berejiklian ministry being formed.

Governor-General of Australia

The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of the Australian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. As the Queen is concurrently the monarch of 15 other Commonwealth realms, and resides in the United Kingdom, she, on the advice of her prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out constitutional duties within the Commonwealth of Australia. The governor-general has formal presidency over the Federal Executive Council and is commander-in-chief of the Australian Defence Force. The functions of the governor-general include appointing ministers, judges, and ambassadors; giving royal assent to legislation passed by parliament; issuing writs for election; and bestowing Australian honours.In general, the governor-general observes the conventions of the Westminster system and responsible government, maintaining a political neutrality, and has almost always acted only on the advice of the prime minister or other ministers or, in certain cases, parliament. The governor-general also has a ceremonial role: hosting events at either of the two official residences—Government House in the capital, Canberra, and Admiralty House in Sydney—and travelling throughout Australia to open conferences, attend services and commemorations, and generally provide encouragement to individuals and groups who are contributing to their communities. When travelling abroad, the governor-general is seen as the representative of Australia, and the Queen of Australia. The governor-general is supported by a staff (of 80 in 2018) headed by the Official Secretary to the Governor-General of Australia.

A governor-general is not appointed for a specific term, but is generally expected to serve for five years subject to a possible short extension. Since 1 July 2019, the governor-general has been General David Hurley.From Federation in 1901 until 1965, 11 out of the 15 governors-general were British aristocrats; they included four barons, three viscounts, three earls, and one royal duke. Since then, all but one of the governors-general have been Australian-born; the exception, Sir Ninian Stephen, arrived in Australia as a teenager. Only one governor-general, Dame Quentin Bryce (2008–2014), has been a woman.

Governor of New South Wales

The Governor of New South Wales is the viceregal representative of the Australian monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, in the state of New South Wales. In an analogous way to the Governor-General of Australia at the national level, the Governors of the Australian states perform constitutional and ceremonial functions at the state level. The governor is appointed by the queen on the advice of the premier of New South Wales, for an unfixed period of time—known as serving At Her Majesty's pleasure—though five years is the norm. The current governor is retired judge Margaret Beazley, who succeeded David Hurley on 2 May 2019.

The office has its origin in the 18th-century colonial governors of New South Wales upon its settlement in 1788, and is the oldest continuous institution in Australia. The present incarnation of the position emerged with the Federation of Australia and the New South Wales Constitution Act 1902, which defined the viceregal office as the governor acting by and with the advice of the Executive Council of New South Wales. However, the post still ultimately represented the government of the United Kingdom until, after continually decreasing involvement by the British government, the passage in 1942 of the Statute of Westminster Adoption Act 1942 (see Statute of Westminster) and the Australia Act 1986, after which the governor became the direct, personal representative of the uniquely Australian sovereign.

John Hurley and Ronnie Wilkins

John David Hurley (April 18, 1941 – August 16, 1986) and Ronald Stephen Wilkins (born October 8, 1941) were American musicians and songwriting partners responsible for writing the hit songs "Love of the Common People" and "Son of a Preacher Man". Hurley also recorded three albums in the 1970s.

List of governors-general of Australia

The Governor-General of Australia is the head of the executive branch of the federal government, serving as the representative of the Australian monarch (currently Elizabeth II). The position came into being with the adoption of the new national constitution on 1 January 1901, and has been held by 26 people since then. Governors-general have no fixed term, but have usually served for around five years.

Margaret Beazley

Margaret Joan Beazley, (born 23 July 1951) is an Australian jurist who is the 39th and current Governor of New South Wales, serving since 2 May 2019. She was the president of the New South Wales Court of Appeal, the first woman to hold the office, from 2013 until February 2019.

Marie Bashir

Dame Marie Roslyn Bashir, (born 1 December 1930) is the former and second longest-serving Governor of New South Wales. Born in Narrandera, New South Wales, Bashir graduated from the University of Sydney in 1956 and held various medical positions, with a particular emphasis in psychiatry. In 1993 Bashir was appointed the Clinical Director of Mental Health Services for the Central Sydney Area Health Service, a position she held until appointed governor on 1 March 2001. She has also served as the Chancellor of the University of Sydney (2007–2012).

Bashir retired on 1 October 2014, and was succeeded as governor by General David Hurley.

Peter Cosgrove

General Sir Peter John Cosgrove, (born 28 July 1947) is a retired senior Australian Army officer who served as the 26th Governor-General of Australia, in office from 2014 to 2019.

A graduate of the Royal Military College, Duntroon, Cosgrove fought in the Vietnam War, receiving the Military Cross in 1971. From 1983 to 1984, he was commander of the 1st Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment, and he later served as commander of the 6th Brigade and the 1st Division. Cosgrove rose to prominence in 1999, when he served as commander of the International Force for East Timor (INTERFET), which oversaw the peacekeeping mission in East Timor during its transition to independence.

Cosgrove was Australia's Chief of Army from 2000 to 2002, and then Chief of the Defence Force from 2002 to 2005, receiving corresponding promotions to lieutenant general and general. Cosgrove retired from active service following the end of his term as Chief of the Defence Force, and subsequently served as leader of a taskforce helping to rebuild communities in Queensland after Cyclone Larry in 2006. In January 2014, Cosgrove was named to succeed Dame Quentin Bryce as Governor-General of Australia. He was sworn in on 28 March 2014, and made a Knight of the Order of Australia on the same date. Cosgrove retired as governor-general on 1 July 2019, and was succeeded by General David Hurley.

Robin Tyson

Robin Tyson is an English countertenor in opera, solo, and a cappella.

He sang in the Choir of King's College, Cambridge from 1989-1992. He is known for singing as a soloist with John Eliot Gardiner's Bach Cantata Pilgrimage in 2000. Tyson performed and recorded Francesco Cavalli's opera La Calisto at La Monnaie in Brussels, conducted by René Jacobs. He was a member of The King's Singers from 2001 to 2009, with whom he won a Grammy Award for the album Simple Gifts.

He started the music agency at Edition Peters in 2011. He is manager for Voces8, composer Ēriks Ešenvalds, Paul Phoenix and others.

Tyson joined the King's Singers as the second countertenor in 2001, in place of Nigel Short. He left in 2009 and was succeeded by Timothy Wayne-Wright. Tyson was part of the King's Singers production of Spem in Alium by Thomas Tallis, a 40-part piece. Unlike his only countertenor counterpart, David Hurley, Tyson used his falsetto voice to reach higher notes, while Hurley was able to sing some of his notes without falsetto. Tyson released, along with the Grammy winning Simple Gifts, From Byrd to the Beatles, a documentary covering the making of Spem in Alium, along with numerous other albums and singles.

Second Baird ministry

The Second Baird ministry was the 95th ministry of the Government of New South Wales, and was led by Mike Baird, the state's 44th Premier. It is the second and subsequent of two occasions when Baird served as Premier.

The Liberal–National coalition ministry was formed following the 2015 state election where the Baird government was re-elected.

Baird announced his ministry on 1 April 2015 and the ministry was sworn in on 2 April 2015 at Government House by the Governor of New South Wales David Hurley.The ministry ended upon the resignation by Baird as Premier, and the swearing in of Gladys Berejiklian as the Premier and John Barilaro as Deputy Premier on 23 January 2017. The residual of Berejiklian ministry took office with effect from 30 January 2017.

Second Berejiklian ministry

The Second Berejiklian ministry is the 97th ministry of the Government of New South Wales, and is led by Gladys Berejiklian, the state's 45th Premier. It is the second and subsequent of two occasions that Berejiklian served as Premier.

The Liberal–National coalition ministry was formed following the 2019 state election where the Berejikilian government was re-elected. The ministry was sworn in by the Governor David Hurley on 2 April 2019.

Stephen Loosley

Stephen Loosley AM FRSN (born 29 December 1952) was a New South Wales Labor Senator from 1990 to 1995.Loosley had served as National President of the ALP between 1991 and 1992.

Loosley is an expert on American politics and is a regular commentator on US elections in Australian media outlets.

In 2018 Stephen Loosely was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of New South Wales (Est 1821) and in January 2019 was gazetted as such by the then Governor,His Excellency the Honourable David Hurley AC DSC(Rtd) in the NSW Government Gazette.

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Chief of the Defence Force
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