David G. Hartwell

David Geddes Hartwell (July 10, 1941 – January 20, 2016) was an American critic, publisher, and editor of thousands of science fiction and fantasy novels. He was best known for work with Signet, Pocket, and Tor Books publishers. He was also noted as an award-winning editor of anthologies. The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction describes him as "perhaps the single most influential book editor of the past forty years in the American [science fiction] publishing world".[1]

David G. Hartwell
Hartwell the morning after winning the Hugo, 2006.
Hartwell the morning after winning the Hugo, 2006.
BornDavid Geddes Hartwell
July 10, 1941
Salem, Massachusetts, U.S.
DiedJanuary 20, 2016 (aged 74)
Plattsburgh, New York, U.S.
OccupationEditor, literary critic
GenreScience fiction, fantasy, horror
Spouse
Patricia Lee Wolcott
(m. 1969; div. 1992)

Kathryn Cramer (m. 1997)
Children4
Website
davidghartwell.com
David Hartwell 2008
David Hartwell, 2008

Early years

Hartwell was born in Salem, Massachusetts, and attended Williams College, where he graduated with a BA in 1963. He continued his studies at Colgate University for an MA in 1965, and at Columbia University where he graduated with a Ph.D. in Comparative Medieval Literature in 1973. By 1965 Hartwell was already working as editor and publisher of The Little Magazine (1965-1988), a small press literary magazine.[2]

Career

Hartwell worked for Signet (1971–73), Berkley Putnam (1973–78) and Pocket, where he founded the Timescape imprint (1980–85) and created the Pocket Books Star Trek publishing line. From 1984 until his death he worked for Tor Books,[3] where he spearheaded Tor's Canadian publishing initiative at CAN-CON in Ottawa, and was also influential in bringing many Australian writers to the US market. Since 1995, his title at Tor/Forge Books was "Senior Editor".[2]

In 1977, Hartwell edited the short-lived Cosmos magazine for the newly formed Baronet publishing. Cosmos is remembered as "a fine magazine, providing a good range of quality fiction" in an attractive package, but poor sales for the rest of the publisher's magazine line forced its cancellation after only four issues.[4]

In 1988, Hartwell founded The New York Review of Science Fiction, where he served as reviews editor. The magazine was published by Dragon Press, a small independent publisher and bookseller, first established by Hartwell in 1988 as a partnership. He later became the sole proprietor. Hartwell chaired the board of directors of the World Fantasy Convention and, with Gordon Van Gelder, was the administrator of the Philip K. Dick Award. Hartwell edited numerous anthologies, and published a number of critical essays on science fiction and fantasy.[2]

Hartwell was also a book review editor of rock music magazine Crawdaddy!, founded by Paul Williams (music journalist) in 1966, and published through the 1970s.[3]

Awards and other achievements

Hartwell edited two annual anthologies: Year's Best SF, started in 1996 and co-edited with Kathryn Cramer since 2002, and Year's Best Fantasy, co-edited with Cramer from 2001 through 2010. Both anthologies have consistently placed in the top 10 of the Locus annual reader poll in the category of Best Anthology. In 1988, he won the World Fantasy Award in the category Best Anthology for The Dark Descent.[5]

Hartwell was nominated for the Hugo Award forty-one times, nineteen in the category of Best Professional Editor and Best Editor Long Form, winning in 2006, 2008 and 2009, and twenty-two times as editor/publisher of The New York Review of Science Fiction. He has also placed in the top ten in the Locus poll for best editor for twenty-seven consecutive years, every year from the award category's inception to the present day.[6] He edited the best-novel Nebula Award-winners Timescape by Gregory Benford (published 1980), The Claw of the Conciliator by Gene Wolfe (published 1981), and No Enemy But Time by Michael Bishop (published 1982), the best-novel Hugo Award-winner Hominids by Robert J. Sawyer (published 2002), and the World Fantasy Award-winning novels The Shadow of the Torturer by Gene Wolfe (1981) and The Dragon Waiting by John M. Ford (1984).[6][7]

Hartwell was a Guest of Honor at the 67th World Science Fiction Convention in Montreal in 2009.[8]

He was posthumously awarded the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award in October 2016.[9]

Personal life

Hartwell was known for flamboyant fashion choices.[10] In 1969 he married Patricia Lee Wolcott. They had two children, but divorced in 1992. He married Kathryn Cramer in 1997, and they had two children. Hartwell lived in Pleasantville, New York.[7]

On January 19, 2016, Hartwell was hospitalized after suffering severe head trauma from a fall at home.[11] Cramer released a statement that the fall caused a "massive brain bleed from which he is not expected to recover".[12][13] He died the following day at a hospital in Plattsburgh, New York.[14][15]

Works

Books as writer

  • Age of Wonders: Exploring the World of Science Fiction (Walker & Co., 1985; ISBN 0-8027-0808-0), 205 pp.; paperback edition 1985, McGraw-Hill, 224 pp., ISBN 0-07-026963-7[16] Revised/expanded edition published by Tor, 1996, 319 pp., ISBN 0-312-86235-0.

Magazines edited

  • The Little Magazine (1965-1988), a small press literary magazine
  • Cosmos Magazine (1977), Baronet publishing.
  • The New York Review of Science Fiction (1988–2016) with Kathryn Cramer and Ariel Haméon and Kevin J. Maroney and Arthur D. Hlavaty and Matthew Appleton and others

Standalone anthologies

  • The Battle of the Monsters and Other Stories (1976) with L. W. Currey
  • The World Treasury of Science Fiction (1988)
  • Masterpieces of Fantasy and Enchantment (1988) with Kathryn Cramer
  • Spirits of Christmas (1989) with Kathryn Cramer
  • Christmas Stars (1993)
  • Christmas Forever (1993)
  • Christmas Magic (1994)
  • Northern Stars: The Anthology of Canadian Science Fiction (1994) with Glenn Grant
  • The Screaming Skull and Other Great American Ghost Stories (1994)
  • The Ascent of Wonder: The Evolution of Hard SF[17] (1994) with Kathryn Cramer
  • Masterpieces of Fantasy and Wonder (1994) with Kathryn Cramer
  • Visions of Wonder (1996) with Milton T. Wolf
  • The Science Fiction Century (1997)
  • Bodies of the Dead and Other Great American Ghost Stories (1997)
  • Northern Suns (1999) with Glenn Grant
  • Centaurus: The Best of Australian Science Fiction (1999) with Damien Broderick
  • The Hard SF Renaissance (2002) with Kathryn Cramer
  • The Science Fiction Century, Volume One (2006)
  • The Space Opera Renaissance (2006) with Kathryn Cramer (Tor Books)
  • The Sword & Sorcery Anthology (2012) with Jacob Weisman (Tachyon Publications)
  • Twenty-First Century Science Fiction (2013) with Patrick Nielsen Hayden (Tor Books)

Anthology series

See also

References

  1. ^ SF Encyclopedia
  2. ^ a b c "Hartwell, David G." Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  3. ^ a b Anders, Charlie Jane (January 20, 2016). "David G. Hartwell Kept Restoring Our Faith In Science Fiction". Gizmodo. Retrieved 24 January 2016.
  4. ^ Mike Ashley, Gateways to Forever, Liverpool University Press, 2007, pp.323-325. ISBN 978-1846310034
  5. ^ World Fantasy Convention. "Award Winners and Nominees". Archived from the original on 2010-12-01. Retrieved 4 Feb 2011.
  6. ^ a b Science Fiction Awards Database
  7. ^ a b "Interview with David Hartwell". LOCUS. September 2004. Archived from the original on 20 September 2008. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  8. ^ In Memoriam: David G. Hartwell (SFWA)
  9. ^ the 2016 World Fantasy Award Winners, Tor.com, October 30, 2016.
  10. ^ "David Hartwell's sartorial splendour 1941-2016". 20 January 2016. Retrieved 23 January 2016.
  11. ^ Til Death Did Us Part by Kathryn Cramer, January 21, 2015, Kathryn Cramer.com.
  12. ^ "Kathryn Cramer - Late this afternoon David had a massive... - Facebook".
  13. ^ Locus Publications. "Locus Online News » David Hartwell in Critical Condition".
  14. ^ "David G. Hartwell (1941-2016)". 20 Jan 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-01-21. Retrieved 20 Jan 2016.
  15. ^ Slotnik, Daniel E. (February 3, 2016). "David G. Hartwell, Literary-Minded Editor of Science Fiction, Dies at 74". The New York Times.
  16. ^ Age of Wonders [...] title listing at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database. ISFDB. Retrieved 2015-03-28.
  17. ^ THE ASCENT OF WONDER, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer Archived 2006-08-28 at the Wayback Machine

External links

Australian science fiction

Australia, unlike Europe, does not have a long history in the genre of science fiction. Nevil Shute's On the Beach, published in 1957, and filmed in 1959, was perhaps the first notable international success. Though not born in Australia, Shute spent his latter years there, and the book was set in Australia. It might have been worse had the imports of American pulp magazines not been restricted during WWII, forcing local writers into the field. Various compilation magazines began appearing in the 1960s and the field has continued to expand into some significance. Today Australia has a thriving SF/Fantasy genre with names recognised around the world. In 2013 a trilogy by Sydney-born Ben Peek was sold at auction to a UK publisher for a six-figure deal .

Edward E. Smith Memorial Award

The Edward E. Smith Memorial Award for Imaginative Fiction, or "Skylark", annually recognizes someone for lifetime contributions to science fiction, "both through work in the field and by exemplifying the personal qualities which made the late "Doc" Smith well-loved by those who knew him." It is presented by the New England Science Fiction Association at its annual convention, Boskone, to someone chosen by a vote of NESFA members. The trophy is a large lens mounted on a simple plinth.The award was inaugurated in 1966, the year after Smith's death. Fifty-one people have been honored in 49 years to 2015 (Hal Clement received the award twice, in 1969 and 1997).

Skylark recipients

Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Professional Editor is given each year for editors of magazines, novels, anthologies, or other works related to science fiction or fantasy. The award supplanted a previous award for professional magazine.

The award was first presented in 1973, and was given annually through 2006. Beginning in 2007, the award was split into two categories, that of Best Editor (Short Form) and Best Editor (Long Form). The Short Form award is for editors of anthologies, collections or magazines, while the Long Form award is for editors of novels. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, and in each case an award for professional editor was given.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention, or Worldcon, and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the six most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near Labor Day, and are held in a different city around the world each year. Members are permitted to vote "no award", if they feel that none of the nominees is deserving of the award that year, and in the case that "no award" takes the majority the Hugo is not given in that category. This happened in both the Short Form and Long Form categories in 2015.During the 52 nomination years, 64 editors have been nominated for the original Best Professional Editor, the Short Form, or the Long Form award, including Retro Hugos. Of these, Gardner Dozois has received the most awards, with 15 original awards out of 19 nominations for the original category and one for the Short Form. The only other editors to win more than three awards are Ben Bova, who won 6 of 8 nominations for the original award, Ellen Datlow, who won 7 of 17 nominations, split between the original and short form awards, and John W. Campbell, Jr. with 6 out of 6 nominations for the Retro Hugo awards. The two editors who have won three times are Edward L. Ferman with 3 out of 20 original nominations and Patrick Nielsen Hayden with 3 out of 3 Long Form nominations. Stanley Schmidt has received the most nominations, at 27 original and 7 Short Form, winning one Short Form.

Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine

The Hugo Awards are given every year by the World Science Fiction Society for the best science fiction or fantasy works and achievements of the previous year. The award is named after Hugo Gernsback, the founder of the pioneering science fiction magazine Amazing Stories, and was once officially known as the Science Fiction Achievement Award. The award has been described as "a fine showcase for speculative fiction" and "the best known literary award for science fiction writing". The Hugo Award for Best Semiprozine is given each year for semi-professionally-edited magazines related to science fiction or fantasy which had published four or more issues, with at least one issue appearing in the previous calendar year. Awards were once also given out for professional magazines in the professional magazine category, and are still awarded for fan magazines in the fanzine category.

The award was first presented in 1984, and has been given annually since. A "semiprozine" is defined for the award as a magazine in the field that is not professional but that (unlike a fanzine) either pays its contributors in something other than copies, or is (generally) available only for payment. In addition to the regular Hugo awards, beginning in 1996 Retrospective Hugo Awards, or "Retro Hugos", have been available to be awarded for years 50, 75, or 100 years prior in which no awards were given. To date, Retro Hugo awards have been awarded for 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1951, and 1954, but the category failed to receive enough to form a ballot each time.Hugo Award nominees and winners are chosen by supporting or attending members of the annual World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), and the presentation evening constitutes its central event. The selection process is defined in the World Science Fiction Society Constitution as instant-runoff voting with six nominees, except in the case of a tie. The works on the ballot are the most-nominated by members that year, with no limit on the number of works that can be nominated. The 1953 through 1956 and 1958 awards did not include any recognition of runner-up magazines, but since 1959 all six candidates were recorded. Initial nominations are made by members in January through March, while voting on the ballot of six nominations is performed roughly in April through July, subject to change depending on when that year's Worldcon is held. Prior to 2017, the final ballot was five works; it was changed that year to six, with each initial nominator limited to five nominations. Worldcons are generally held near the start of September, and are held in a different city around the world each year. At the 2008 business meeting, an amendment to the World Science Fiction Society's Constitution was passed which would remove this category. The vote to ratify this amendment was held the following year; the ratification failed and the category remained. Instead, a committee was formed to recommend improvements to the category and related categories.During the 35 nomination years, 36 magazines run by 105 editors have been nominated. Of these, only 8 magazines run by 23 editors have won. Locus won 22 times and was nominated every year until a rules change in 2012 made it ineligible for the category. Uncanny Magazine has won 3 times in a row, 2016–2018, while Science Fiction Chronicle, Clarkesworld Magazine, and Lightspeed are the only other magazines to win more than once, with 2 awards out of 18 nominations, 3 out of 4, and 2 out of 5, respectively, while Ansible has won 1 out of 7 nominations, Interzone has won 1 out of 28, and Weird Tales has won 1 out of its 3 nominations. As editor of Locus Charles N. Brown won 21 of 27 nominations, though he shared 5 of those awards with Kirsten Gong-Wong, 3 with Liza Groen Trombi and 2 with Jennifer A. Hall. Uncanny's awards were earned by a team of 5 people, Lynne M. Thomas, Michael Damian Thomas, Michi Trota, Erika Ensign, and Steven Schapansky. The sole editor for Chronicle's awards was Andrew I. Porter, while David Pringle earned Interzone's, and Ann VanderMeer and Stephen H. Segal were the editors for Weird Tales's victory. Lightspeed's wins were under John Joseph Adams, Rich Horton, and Stefan Rudnicki, with Wendy N. Wagner and Christie Yant added for the second win, while David Langford was the editor when Ansible was awarded. Clarkesworld Magazine's winning years were under Neil Clarke, Sean Wallace, and Kate Baker, with 2 of the three also under Cheryl Morgan and the other under Jason Heller. The New York Review of Science Fiction has received the most number of nominations without ever winning at 22, under the helm of David G. Hartwell, Kathryn Cramer, Kevin J. Maroney, and 8 other editors. The next highest number of nominations without winning is 7 for Speculations under Kent Brewster, Denise Lee, and Susan Fry.

Kathryn Cramer

Kathryn Elizabeth Cramer (born April 16, 1962) is an American science fiction writer, editor, and literary critic.

Philip K. Dick Award

The Philip K. Dick Award is a science fiction award given annually at Norwescon and sponsored by the Philadelphia Science Fiction Society and (since 2005) the Philip K. Dick Trust. Named after science fiction and fantasy writer Philip K. Dick, it has been awarded since 1983, the year after his death. It is awarded to the best original paperback published each year in the US.The award was founded by Thomas Disch with assistance from David G. Hartwell, Paul S. Williams, and Charles N. Brown. As of 2016, it is administered by Gordon Van Gelder. Past administrators include Algis Budrys, David G. Hartwell, and David Alexander Smith.

Readercon

Readercon is an annual science fiction convention, held every July in the Boston, Massachusetts area, in Burlington, Massachusetts. It was founded by Bob Colby and statistician Eric Van in the mid-1980s with the goal of focusing almost exclusively on science fiction/fantasy/slipstream/speculative fiction in the written form (on the rare occasion that there is a discussion held about non-written science fiction, it will have a tongue-in-cheek title such as "Our biannual media panel"). Past guests of honor have included authors such as Greer Gilman, Gene Wolfe, Octavia Butler, Samuel R. Delany, Karen Joy Fowler, Brian Aldiss, Nalo Hopkinson, Joe Haldeman, Caitlín R. Kiernan, Peter Straub, and China Miéville, and editors such as Ellen Datlow and David G. Hartwell. The convention also makes a point of honoring a deceased author as the Memorial Guest of Honor. In 2009, for instance, the guests of honor were the living writers Elizabeth Hand and Greer Gilman and the memorial guest of honor was Hope Mirrlees.Total attendance at the convention has been consistently around 850 for many years.From 2005 to 2011, Readercon was the official venue for presentation of the Rhysling Award. It has hosted the Shirley Jackson Awards since their founding in 2007.

Supernatural Horror in Literature

"Supernatural Horror in Literature" is a long essay by American writer H. P. Lovecraft, surveying the topic of horror fiction. It was written between November 1925 and May 1927 and revised during 1933–1934. It was first published in 1927 in the one-issue magazine The Recluse. More recently, it was included in the collection Dagon and Other Macabre Tales (1965).

Lovecraft examines the beginnings of weird fiction in the gothic novel (relying greatly on Edith Birkhead's 1921 survey The Tale of Terror) and traces its development through such writers as Ambrose Bierce, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Edgar Allan Poe (who merits his own chapter). Lovecraft names as the four "modern masters" of horror: Algernon Blackwood, Lord Dunsany, M. R. James, and Arthur Machen.

An H. P. Lovecraft Encyclopedia terms the work "HPL's most significant literary essay and one of the finest historical analyses of horror literature." Upon reading the essay, M. R. James proclaimed Lovecraft's style "most offensive". However,

Edmund Wilson, who was not an admirer of Lovecraft's fiction, praised the essay as a "really able piece of

work...he had read comprehensively in this field—he was strong on the Gothic novelists—and

writes about it with much intelligence". David G. Hartwell has called "Supernatural Horror in Literature", "the most important essay on horror literature".

Think Like a Dinosaur

"Think Like a Dinosaur" (1995) is a science fiction novelette written by James Patrick Kelly. Originally published in the June 1995 issue of Asimov's Science Fiction magazine, it was subsequently featured in:

Year's Best SF (1996, edited by David G. Hartwell)

The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirteenth Annual Collection (1996, edited by Gardner Dozois)

Nebula Awards 31 (1997, edited by Pamela Sargent)

Think Like a Dinosaur and Other Stories (1997, by James Patrick Kelley)

"Think Like a Dinosaur" episode of The Outer Limits (2001)

The Hard SF Renaissance (2002, edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer)The story won the 1996 Hugo Award for Best Novelette, the Asimov's Reader Poll Award, and the SF Chronicle Award. It was also nominated for the Locus Poll Award, the HOMer Award and the Nebula Award.

It was read by Michael O'Hare for Sci-Fi's Seeing Ear Theatre.

Timescape Books

Timescape Books was a science fiction line from Pocket Books operating from 1981 to 1985. Pocket Books is an imprint of Simon & Schuster

It was named after the Gregory Benford novel Timescape, which was not published by the Timescape imprint. The imprint was founded by David G. Hartwell. It published both original hardcover and reprinted mass market paperback novels. Many of the imprint's titles were nominees or winners of Hugo and Nebula awards, along with other major SF awards. It published more than 30 original hardcover works and over 100 paperback titles, but the imprint was not financially successful enough for the parent company at the time, as it was not producing major bestsellers.

Uhura's Song

Uhura's Song is a Star Trek: The Original Series novel written by Janet Kagan published in 1985. Kagan was asked to produce an outline by editor David G. Hartwell, after he read the manuscript of her novel Hellspark. She was unfamiliar with Star Trek and needed to research the series whilst writing Uhura's Song. She subsequently proposed two sequels, but they went unwritten as they featured original characters introduced in Uhura's Song.

Year's Best SF

Year's Best SF is a science fiction anthology series edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer. Hartwell started the series in 1996, and has been co-editing it with Cramer since 2002. It is published by HarperCollins under the Eos imprint. The creators of the books are not involved with the similarly titled Year's Best Science Fiction series.

Cramer and Hartwell also edit an annual collection of the Year's Best Fantasy.

Year's Best SF 10

Year's Best SF 10 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2005. It is the tenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 11

Year's Best SF 11 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2006. It is the eleventh in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 14

Year's Best SF 14 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2009. It is the fourteenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 15

Year's Best SF 15 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in June 2010. It is the fifteenth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 7

Year's Best SF 7 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2002. It is the seventh in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 8

Year's Best SF 8 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2003. It is the eighth in the Year's Best SF series.

Year's Best SF 9

Year's Best SF 9 is a science fiction anthology edited by David G. Hartwell and Kathryn Cramer that was published in 2004. It is the ninth in the Year's Best SF series.

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