David DeJesus

David Christopher DeJesus (/dəˈheɪsuːs/; born December 20, 1979) is an American former professional baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Kansas City Royals, Oakland Athletics, Chicago Cubs, Washington Nationals, Tampa Bay Rays and Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. DeJesus, who is of Puerto Rican descent, is currently an analyst for the Cubs with NBC Sports Chicago. His wife, Kim, is an actress.

David DeJesus
David DeJesus on April 16, 2014
DeJesus with the Tampa Bay Rays
Outfielder
Born: December 20, 1979 (age 39)
Brooklyn, New York
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 2, 2003, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
September 23, 2015, for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim
MLB statistics
Batting average.275
Home runs99
Runs batted in573
Teams

Career

DeJesus was raised in Manalapan Township, New Jersey,[1] and played high school baseball at Manalapan High School.[2] He was drafted out of high school by the New York Mets in the 43rd round of the 1997 Major League Baseball Draft. DeJesus did not sign with the Mets, opting instead to attend Rutgers University. Three years later, he was drafted in the fourth round of the 2000 Major League Baseball Draft by the Kansas City Royals.

Kansas City Royals

DeJesus made his Major League debut on September 2, 2003. After Carlos Beltrán was traded to the Houston Astros in 2004, DeJesus became the starting center fielder for the Royals. He finished sixth in the 2004 Rookie of the Year voting. On March 9, 2006, DeJesus signed a five-year, $13.8 million contract extension with the Royals through 2010, with a club option for the 2011 season.[3] On June 15, 2008, De Jesus hit the first grand slam of his career. This prompted the game caller to remark, "He smashed the living DeJesus out of that ball!"[4]

In 2010, DeJesus was in threat of being traded along with his fellow starting outfielders, Scott Podsednik and José Guillén, who were both traded. DeJesus, on the other hand, tore a tendon on his right thumb crashing into a fence in Yankee Stadium in July and had season ending surgery.[5] DeJesus was hoping to return to the team in September, but instead was moved to the 60-Day DL.[6] He finished the 2010 season batting .318 with 5 home runs and 37 RBIs in 352 at-bats.[7]

On October 2, 2010, the Royals picked up his $6 million club option for 2011.

Oakland Athletics

David DeJesus on June 8, 2011 (1)
DeJesus during his tenure with the Oakland Athletics in 2011

On November 11, 2010, DeJesus was traded to the Oakland Athletics for pitcher Vin Mazzaro and minor league pitcher Justin Marks.

Chicago Cubs

On November 30, 2011, DeJesus signed a two-year deal worth $10 million, to be the primary right fielder for the Chicago Cubs.[8]

In 2013, due to the signing of Nate Schierholtz, DeJesus moved to center field for the 2013 season.

Washington Nationals

On August 19, 2013, DeJesus was traded to the Washington Nationals for a player to be named later.[9] He appeared in three games for the Nationals, going 0-for-3.

Tampa Bay Rays

On August 23, the Nationals traded DeJesus to the Tampa Bay Rays for future considerations.[10] DeJesus got off to a hot start with the Rays culminating in a walk-off single in the 18th inning against the Baltimore Orioles scoring Desmond Jennings.[11]

On November 6, 2013, DeJesus re-signed [12] with the Rays, inking a two-year, $10.5 million deal. The Rays, without a true designated hitter, put DeJesus in that role in 2014, where he appeared the most. On June 19, DeJesus was placed on the disabled list with a left hand fracture on a check swing the previous day.[13] He was hitting .269 with 5 HR and 17 RBI in 62 games before the injury. He was leading the team with a .367 OBP and a .440 SLG.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

On July 28, 2015, DeJesus was traded to the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim for minor league pitcher Eduar Lopez.[14][15]

Retirement

On March 22, 2017 DeJesus announced his retirement. [1]

Personal life

DeJesus is married to former model and Amazing Race 23 contestant Kim DeJesus.[16] Together, they have a son named David Kingston DeJesus Jr. He goes by the name Kingston.

References

  1. ^ DeJesus: Baseball beginnings Archived March 4, 2008, at the Wayback Machine, Major League Baseball, October 28, 2003. Accessed February 20, 2008. "My name is David DeJesus. I was born in Brooklyn, New York and raised in Manalapan, New Jersey."
  2. ^ David DeJesus player profile, Kansas City Royals. Accessed July 19, 2007. "Full name is David Christopher DeJesus...graduated from Manalapan (N.J.) High in 1997"
  3. ^ Kaegel, Dick (March 9, 2006). "Notes: DeJesus inks long-term deal Contract runs gh 2010 with club option for 2011". MLB.com. Archived from the original on March 29, 2012. Retrieved December 19, 2008.
  4. ^ "De Jesús y Posada producen en grande" (in Spanish). Primera Hora. June 17, 2008. Retrieved June 17, 2008.
  5. ^ "Royals' DeJesus needs surgery; out 10 weeks". ESPN.com. July 23, 2010.
  6. ^ "David DeJesus". ESPN.com.
  7. ^ "David DeJesus 2010 Batting Gamelogs". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved November 2, 2017.
  8. ^ Muskat, Carrie (November 30, 2011). "Cubs sign DeJesus to play right field". MLB.com. Retrieved December 1, 2011.
  9. ^ Perry, Dayn (August 19, 2013). "Nationals acquire David DeJesus from Cubs". CBSSports.com.
  10. ^ "Rays acquire David DeJesus from Nationals".
  11. ^ http://tampabay.rays.mlb.com/mlb/gameday/index.jsp?gid=2013_09_20_balmlb_tbamlb_1&mode=recap_home&c_id=tb
  12. ^ "DeJesus, Rays agree to $10.5M, 2-year deal". ESPN.com. November 6, 2013.
  13. ^ Mooney, Roger (June 19, 2014). "Rays place DeJesus on DL". The Tampa Tribune.
  14. ^ Gonzalez, Alden (July 28, 2015). "Angels acquire outfielders DeJesus, Murphy". MLB.com. Retrieved July 28, 2015.
  15. ^ Angels [@Angels] (July 28, 2015). "Today the #Angels have acquired OF David DeJesus from the Tampa Bay Rays in exchange for RHP Eduar Lopez" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  16. ^ "MLB wives Nicky Getz, Kim DeJesus team up on The Amazing Race". MLB.com.

https://www.cbssports.com/mlb/players/playerpage/392080/david-dejesus

External links

1997 Major League Baseball draft

The 1997 First-Year Player Draft, Major League Baseball's annual amateur draft of high school and college baseball players, was held on June 2 and 3, 1997. A total of 1607 players were drafted over the course of 92 rounds.

2003 Kansas City Royals season

The 2003 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing third in the American League Central, with a record of 83 wins and 79 losses. It was the only winning season for the franchise between 1994 and 2013.

2003 was a hopeful and promising winning season ("We Believe" was the slogan) for the Royals, and the team spent 93 days in first place in the AL Central. But the team faded down the stretch, falling out of first place for the last time on August 31, and missed the playoffs.

2004 Kansas City Royals season

The 2004 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 58 wins and 104 losses. It was one of the most disappointing seasons in Royals' history. The team had been picked by many sporting magazines to win the AL Central following their third-place finish in 2003. Injuries of veteran acquisitions did the Royals in. Catcher Benito Santiago and outfielder Juan González both played very few games for the boys in blue. Mike Sweeney was also injured during the campaign. As a result, the Royals set a new record for most losses in franchise history.

2005 Kansas City Royals season

The 2005 Kansas City Royals season began on April 4 and ended October 2. The Royals competed and finished 5th in the American League Central with a record of 56 wins and 106 losses, 43 games behind first place Chicago White Sox. With 106 losses, the Royals set a record for the most losses in a single season in franchise history, and their third 100-loss season in 4 years. The 2005 Kansas City Royals were plagued by abysmal pitching and an anemic offense, and to date have one of the worst Major League Baseball season records of all-time.

2006 Kansas City Royals season

The 2006 Kansas City Royals season was the 38th season for the franchise, and their 36th at Kauffman Stadium. The Royals finishing 5th in the American League Central with a record of 62 wins and 100 losses and missed the playoffs for the 21st consecutive season.

2007 Kansas City Royals season

The 2007 Kansas City Royals season was the 39th season for the franchise, and their 37th at Kauffman Stadium. the season began with the team attempting to win the Central Division of the American League - a task not achieved since the division was formed in 1994.

In trying to improve on their 62–100 record in the 2006 season, the team avoided a fourth straight 100-loss season. Buddy Bell returned for his second and final full season as manager, while Dayton Moore began his first season as the team's general manager.

Anticipation surrounded the Royals' newfound approach to once again become a playoff contender with rebuilding the roster. Roster moves generated much interest in the Kansas City area, including the big-budget signing of starting pitcher Gil Meche, and the arrival of young, new talent—such as rookie third baseman Alex Gordon and designated hitter Billy Butler. The team's payroll for the 2007 season was increased to $67 million (22nd in the major leagues).

2011 Oakland Athletics season

The Oakland Athletics' 2011 season was the 44th for the franchise in the Bay Area, as well as the 111th in club history. The team was competing for the American League West Division title after a 4-year absence from playoff contention, with a payroll just above $77 million.

2013 Chicago Cubs season

The 2013 Chicago Cubs season was the 142nd season of the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 138th in the National League and the 98th at Wrigley Field. The Cubs finished fifth and last in the National League Central with a record of 66–96. The Cubs began the season on April 1 at the Pittsburgh Pirates and finished the season on September 29 at the St. Louis Cardinals.

The season marked the second year of the Cubs rebuild under President of Baseball Operations Theo Epstein and General Manager Jed Hoyer which would result in the Cubs breaking their 108-year World Series drought and lead the Cubs to the 2016 World Series championship.

The season was the last season with the Cubs for manager Dale Sveum as he was fired following the season. The season was also the last season with the Cubs for slugger Alfonso Soriano who would be traded at the trade deadline.During the season, the Cubs drafted future Rookie of the Year, MVP, and All Star Kris Bryant with the second overall pick of the 2013 Draft. The Cubs would also acquire other players that would play important roles during their 2016 World Series season: Héctor Rondón was selected from the 2012 rule 5 draft from the Cleveland Indians on December 6, 2011, Jake Arrieta and Pedro Strop were acquired via trade with the Baltimore Orioles on July 2, and Carl Edwards Jr. and Justin Grimm were acquired via trade with the Texas Rangers on July 22.

2013 Washington Nationals season

The 2013 Washington Nationals season was the Nationals' ninth season for the baseball franchise of Major League Baseball in the District of Columbia, the sixth season at Nationals Park, and the 45th since the original team was started in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

The Nationals finished the year 2nd place in the National League East division with an 86-76 record, but were unable to return to the postseason after their division-winning 2012 campaign. The 2013 season was also the last with manager Davey Johnson, who retired following the end of the season.

December 20

December 20 is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. There are 11 days remaining until the end of the year.

Eric Stamets

Eric James Stamets (born September 25, 1991) is an American professional baseball shortstop for the Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball (MLB).

List of Major League Baseball career hit by pitch leaders

In baseball, hit by pitch (HBP) is a situation in which a batter or his clothing or equipment (other than his bat) is struck directly by a pitch from the pitcher; the batter is called a hit batsman (HB). A hit batsman is awarded first base, provided that (in the plate umpire's judgment) he made an honest effort to avoid the pitch, although failure to do so is rarely called by an umpire. Being hit by a pitch is often caused by a batter standing too close to, or "crowding", home plate.

Below is the list of the top 100 Major League Baseball players who have been hit by a pitch the most during their MLB careers.

Hughie Jennings holds the Major League record for most hit by pitches, getting hit 287 times in his career. Craig Biggio (285), Tommy Tucker (272), Don Baylor (267), Jason Kendall (254), Ron Hunt (243), Dan McGann (230), and Chase Utley (204) are the only other players to be hit by 200 or more pitches during their careers.

Manalapan High School

Manalapan High School is a comprehensive four-year public high school located in Manalapan Township, New Jersey, United States, operating as part of the Freehold Regional High School District. The school serves students in ninth through twelfth grades from all of Englishtown and portions of Manalapan. The Freehold Regional High School District also serves students from Colts Neck Township, Farmingdale, Freehold Borough, Freehold Township, Howell Township and Marlboro Township. The school has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1975.Manalapan High School is home to the Science/Engineering Specialized Learning Center, or S&E, which is a program for students with an affinity for mathematical and scientific subjects. The program has anywhere between 10 and 40 students in each class and the curriculum consists of courses related to engineering, science and high level mathematics. The high school houses the Law Enforcement Public Safety Academy (LEPS), in which students undergo a course load learning about such fields as criminal justice, first responder procedures, evidence collection, first aid certifications, investigative procedures, civics, Homeland Security, fire science and safety, and emergency medical technicians. Manalapan also houses the Automotive Technical Academy, which helps students prepare for a career in the automotive service industry. Students learn about how engines and vehicles work, how to diagnose, and how to repair vehicles. Students also learn how to use equipment such as scan tools.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 1,939 students and 127.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 15.2:1. There were 130 students (6.7% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 37 (1.9% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.

Ryan Sweeney

Ryan Joseph Sweeney (born February 20, 1985) is an American former Major League Baseball outfielder. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Chicago White Sox, Oakland Athletics, Boston Red Sox and Chicago Cubs.

The Birdland Big Band

The Birdland Big Band is a 16-piece jazz orchestra that performs at the Birdland Jazz Club in New York City. The Birdland Big Band is led by saxophonist David DeJesus

DeJesus joined as saxophonist and leader in October 2017 and brought with him an emphasis on traditional swing and the blues. He hired drummer Chris Smith, bassist Doug Weiss, trumpeter Brandon Lee, and added a fourth trombonist in Ron Wilkins. These musicians joined Glenn Drewes, Tony Lustig, John Walsh, Mark Miller, Kenny Ascher, and Nathan Childers. In 2017 vocalist Veronica Swift was added.

Vinnie Pestano

Vincent "Vinnie" William Pestano (born February 20, 1985) is an American former relief pitcher. A sidearm pitcher, Pestano made his major league debut in 2010.

Wilmington Blue Rocks

The Wilmington Blue Rocks are a Minor League Baseball team located in Wilmington, Delaware. The Blue Rocks play in the Northern Division of the Carolina League.

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