Dave Wilcox

David Wilcox (born September 29, 1942) is a retired professional football player, a linebacker with the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League from 1964 through 1974. Wilcox was selected to play for seven Pro Bowls and was named All-NFL five times during his career. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2000.[1]

Dave Wilcox
refer to caption
Wilcox playing for the 49ers
No. 64
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:September 29, 1942 (age 76)
Ontario, Oregon
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:241 lb (109 kg)
Career information
High school:Vale (OR)
College:Oregon, (Boise JC)
NFL Draft:1964 / Round: 3 / Pick: 29
AFL draft:1964 / Round: 6 / Pick: 46
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:14
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Boise Junior College & Oregon

After graduating from Vale High School in eastern Oregon in 1960, Wilcox began his college football career at Boise Junior College (now Boise State University) and earned junior college All-America honors.[2] After two years in Boise under head coach Lyle Smith, he transferred to the University of Oregon in Eugene in 1962 for his final two campaigns under head coach Len Casanova;[3] His older brother Johnny Wilcox had played for the Ducks on the 1957 team that went to the Rose Bowl,[2] and was selected in the 1960 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles (15th round).

Wilcox was a guard on offense and an end on defense, and teammates at Oregon included Mel Renfro and quarterback Bob Berry.[4] After his senior season in 1963, Wilcox played in the Hula Bowl, Coaches’ All-America Bowl, and the College All-Star Game the following August. He became the first defensive lineman in Hula Bowl history to earn outstanding lineman honors. Both the Houston Oilers of the young American Football League and the San Francisco 49ers of the NFL sought to sign the Oregon star. The Oilers selected him in the sixth round (46th player overall) of the AFL draft,[5] while the 49ers tapped him in the third round (29th overall) of the NFL draft, held two days later.[4][6]

Professional career

San Francisco 49ers

The 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m), 241-pound (109 kg) Wilcox opted to sign with the more established 49ers where he went on to star for 11 seasons. Converted to outside linebacker, Wilcox quickly established himself as one of the league’s finest. Nicknamed "The Intimidator," he was ideally suited for the position, both mentally and physically. Known for his ability to disrupt plays, he was particularly tough on tight ends. He did not let anybody easily off the line of scrimmage whether to block or get into a pass route. Always prepared, Wilcox was a true student of the game and worked to be fundamentally correct.

During the 1964–1974 span, the 49ers had a winning record in four seasons (1965, 1970, 1971, 1972), and made the playoffs in three consecutive seasons (1970, 1971, 1972) under head coach Dick Nolan.[7] In 1970, San Francisco won the NFC West division title with a win-lost-tie record of 10–3–1. In a divisional game of the 1970 NFL Playoffs, San Francisco defeated the Minnesota Vikings 17–14, holding them to 124 net passing yards and 117 yards rushing.[8] However, they lost the NFC championship game to the Dallas Cowboys.[9] In 1971, the 49ers had a particularly good year on defense, allowing only 216 points (15.4 points/game), 6th least in the NFL, and won the NFC West with a record of 9-5. They won their divisional game of the 1971 NFL Playoffs over the Washington Redskins,[10] allowing only 99 yards rushing and 93 net passing yards, but again lost the NFC championship game to Dallas.[11] In 1972, San Francisco won the NFC West for the third straight year with a record of 8-5-1, allowing on defense 249 points (17.8 points/game), 9th in the league. But they lost their divisional game of the 1972 NFL Playoffs to Dallas, thus eliminated by the Cowboys three consecutive years. In those three years, Wilcox at left side linebacker formed a strong tandem with middle linebacker Frank Nunley and right linebacker Skip Vanderbundt.

He thrived on action and wanted it all directed his way. "What I do best," Wilcox once stated, "is not let people block me. I just hate to be blocked." Hall of Fame linebacker Joe Schmidt was impressed by his strength. "He gave us fits," he remarked. "The lead block had to really come out hard to take him out because he was so strong." Aided by his speed and long reach, he was also effective in pass coverage and managed to intercept 14 passes during his career.[6]

Following each season, San Francisco would rate their players based on their performance. The typical score for a linebacker was 750. Wilcox’s score in 1973 was 1,306. That season the veteran linebacker recorded 104 solo tackles, four forced fumbles, and tackled opposing ball carriers for a loss 13 times. Durable, Wilcox missed only one game during his career due to injury. Four times he was named All-NFL (1967, 1971, 1972, 1973) by the AP and two times All-NFC (1971, 1972). He was also selected to play in seven Pro Bowls.[6]

Personal

Born in the eastern Oregon city of Ontario, Wilcox had six sisters and one brother. Wilcox played high school football at nearby Vale Union High School.[12] He lives in Junction City,[13] near Eugene, where his sons Justin and Josh also played football for the Oregon Ducks.[12][14] Justin Wilcox currently serves as the head coach for the California Golden Bears, a Pac-12 Conference foe of Oregon.

References

  1. ^ "Linebacker "The Intimidator" Dave Wilcox". profootballhof.com. n.d. Retrieved 10 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b Kadleck, Dave (October 5, 1961). "Boise's in gridiron spotlight". Deseret News. (Salt Lake City, Utah). p. 2C.
  3. ^ "Just four starting positions set for Oregon Ducks". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. September 11, 1962. p. 8.
  4. ^ a b "Four Webfoots drafted by NFL". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). AP, UPI reports. December 3, 1963. p. 1B.
  5. ^ "Renfro not drafted in first 7 rounds". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). Associated Press. November 30, 1963. p. 1B.
  6. ^ a b c [1]
  7. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/sfo/ SF 49ers team records
  8. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/197012270min.htm
  9. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/197101030sfo.htm
  10. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/197112260sfo.htm
  11. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/boxscores/197201020dal.htm
  12. ^ a b Miller, Ira (July 27, 2000). "Tough as Nails: Hall-bound linebacker Wilcox couldn't be intimidated". San Francisco Chronicle. p. D1. Retrieved 11 October 2011.
  13. ^ Newnham, Blaine (July 17, 1974). "A bunch of bull". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1C.
  14. ^ Bellamy, Ron (August 16, 1996). "He's one Duck who won't..." Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). p. 1C.

External links

1963 Oregon Webfoots football team

The 1963 Oregon Webfoots represented the University of Oregon in the 1963 college football season. The Webfoots were an independent and scored 274 points and allowed 153 points. Led by thirteenth-year head coach Len Casanova, the Ducks were 7–3 in the regular season and won the Sun Bowl over SMU on New Year's Eve.

Notable players included Mel Renfro, Dave Wilcox, H. D. Murphy, and Bob Berry, all selected in the 1964 NFL Draft. Berry was a redshirt junior and played another season for Oregon in 1964. Renfro and Wilcox are members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Murphy was selected late and never played in the NFL; he played in the up-and-coming Continental Football League.

Following the disbandment of the Pacific Coast Conference, both Oregon and Oregon State were independent in football for five seasons, from 1959 through 1963. Both joined the AAWU (Pac-8) for the 1964 season. The Pac-8 had bowl restrictions (Rose Bowl only) until 1975; the Ducks' next postseason appearance was at the 1989 Independence Bowl.

1964 NFL Draft

The 1964 National Football League draft was held in Chicago, Illinois, at the Sheraton Hotel & Towers on Monday, December 2, 1963.The first overall pick was Dave Parks, an end from Texas Tech, selected by the San Francisco 49ers.The AFL draft was two days earlier, on Saturday, November 30. In the next two years, the drafts were held on the same day; following the merger agreement in June 1966, a common draft was instituted for 1967.

The 1964 NFL Draft is notable for the highest number of players enshrined in Pro Football Hall of Fame - 11 Players

1966 All-Pro Team

The Associated Press (AP), United Press International (UPI), Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), and New York Daily News selected All-Pro players following the 1966 NFL season.

1967 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team in 1967. Players from the first and second teams are listed, with players from the first team in bold, where applicable.

1967 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1967 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 18th year with the National Football League. The 49ers had two first round picks and drafted Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier with one of those draft picks.

1968 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1968 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 19th year with the National Football League.

1969 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1969 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 20th year with the National Football League.

1970 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1970. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the consensus All-Pro team for 1970.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1971 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1971 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 22nd year with the National Football League. The 49ers appeared in the NFC Championship Game for the second consecutive year. The team moved into a new home, Candlestick Park. After winning two of their first three games on the road the 49ers lost their first game at Candlestick Park to the Los Angeles Rams 20-13. The 49ers would rebound and win the NFC West for the second year in a row by posting a 9-5 record. However, for the second year in a row the 49ers season ended in disappointment with a 14-3 loss in the NFC Championship Game to the Cowboys in Dallas.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1973 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1973 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 24th in the National Football League. They began the season hoping to improve on their previous years' output of 8–5–1, and looking to make the playoffs for the fourth consecutive season. However, the team finished 5–9 and failed to qualify for the playoffs.

Booknotes

Booknotes is an American television series on the C-SPAN network hosted by Brian Lamb, which originally aired from 1989 to 2004. The format of the show is a one-hour, one-on-one interview with a non-fiction author. The series was broadcast at 8 p.m. Eastern Time each Sunday night, and was the longest-running author interview program in U.S. broadcast history.

David Wilcox

David Wilcox may refer to:

David Wilcox (Canadian musician) (born 1949), Canadian rock musician

David Wilcox (American musician) (born 1958), American folk musician

David Wilcox (singer), member of band Triple 8

David Wilcox (D&H), president of the Delaware and Hudson Railway 1903–1907

David Wilcox (screenwriter), television writer and producer

David Wilcox (bishop) (born 1930), British Anglican bishop

Dave Wilcox (born 1942), American football linebacker

Jared Tyler

Jared Tyler, Tulsa Oklahoma, is an American singer-songwriter. He made his national debut with the release of Blue Alleluia, an album produced by Russ Titelman on Walking Liberty Records, New York City.Tyler has been the supporting act for many artists and bands such as Emmylou Harris, Nickel Creek, Merle Haggard, Wilco, Shelby Lynne, Dave Wilcox, Shannon Lawson, John Hammond and Willis Alan Ramsey. As well as touring with Malcolm Holcombe, Tyler has recorded with Holcombe; Shannon Lawson; The Tractors; Jelly Roll Johnson; bassist and producer Dave Pomeroy; and producer Scott Harding, EmmyLou Harris, Mary Kay Place, Dave Wilcox, and others.

Josh Wilcox

Joshua David Wilcox (born June 5, 1974) is a former American football tight end who played two seasons with the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League. He played college football at the University of Oregon and attended Junction High School in Junction City, Oregon. Wilcox was also a member of the Portland Forest Dragons of the Arena Football League, the Amsterdam Admirals of NFL Europe and the Los Angeles Xtreme of the XFL. He won the Million Dollar Game in the XFL as a member of the Los Angeles Xtreme. Wilcox is the son of Pro Football Hall of Famer Dave Wilcox and brother of college football coach Justin Wilcox. He also spent time as a professional wrestler.

List of East Stirlingshire F.C. players

This is a list of footballers notable for their contributions to East Stirlingshire, from the formation of the club in 1881 to present. It generally includes only players who made more than 100 league appearances for the club, but some players with fewer than 100 appearances are also included. This includes players who represented their national team while with the club, and players who have set a club record, such as most appearances, most goals or biggest transfer fee.Some of the players listed made few or no league appearances for East Stirlingshire, due to their playing for the club before it entered the Scottish Football League in 1900.

Quarterbacks
Running backs
Wide receivers /
ends
Tight ends
Offensive
linemen
Pre-modern era
two-way players
Defensive
linemen
Linebackers
Defensive backs
Placekickers
and punters
Coaches
Contributors

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