Dave Schreiner

David Nathan Schreiner (March 5, 1921 – June 21, 1945) was an American football player. From Lancaster in southwest Wisconsin, he was a two-time All-American and the 1942 Big Ten Most Valuable Player end at Wisconsin and a 1943 second round draft choice of the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. While in college, he worked in a girls' dormitory cafeteria to earn spending money, although his family was comfortable financially. He was mortally wounded in action as a Marine on June 20, 1945 during the Battle of Okinawa and died the next day.[1] He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame in 1955. His life and death are detailed in the book Third Down and a War to Go, written by Terry Frei, the son of Jerry Frei, one of Schreiner's teammates on the 1942 Wisconsin Badgers football team.

Dave Schreiner
Born:March 5, 1921
Lancaster, Wisconsin
Died:June 21, 1945 (aged 24)
Okinawa
Career information
Position(s)End
CollegeWisconsin–Madison
NFL draft1943 / Round: 2 / Pick: 11
Drafted byDetroit Lions

References

  1. ^ "Gives Details on How Schreiner Was Killed on Okinawa". Monroe Evening Times. July 20, 1945. p. 1. Retrieved May 9, 2017 – via Newspapers.com. open access

Further reading

External links

1941 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1941 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1941 Big Ten Conference football season.

1941 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1941 Big Ten Conference football season was the 46th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1941 college football season.

The 1941 Minnesota Golden Gophers football team, led by head coach Bernie Bierman, compiled a perfect 8–0 record, led the conference in both scoring offense and scoring defense, was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll, and won the program's second consecutive national championship. Halfback Bruce Smith was a consensus All-American and won the 1941 Heisman Trophy. Tackle Dick Wildung was also a consensus first-team All-American.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 147 to 41, and was ranked No. 5 in the final AP Poll. Fullback Bob Westfall was selected as a consensus first-team player on the 1941 College Football All-America Team.

Ohio State, under head coach Paul Brown, compiled a 6–1–1 record, outscored opponents 167 to 110, and was ranked No. 13 in the final AP Poll.

1941 College Football All-America Team

The 1941 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1941. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1941 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Harvard center Endicott Peabody, who won the 1941 Knute Rockne Award, was the only player to be unanimously named to the first team of all nine official selectors. Dick Wildung of Minnesota and Bob Westfall of Michigan each received eight official first-team designations. Bruce Smith of Minnesota won the 1941 Heisman Trophy and received seven official first-team nominations.

1941 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1941 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1941 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled a 3–5 record (3–3 against conference opponents) and finished in fifth place in the Big Ten Conference. Harry Stuhldreher was in his sixth year as Wisconsin's head coach.Wisconsin players led the Big Ten in rushing (Pat Harder, 443 rushing yards), passing (Len Seelinger, 419 passing yards), receiving (Dave Schreiner, 249 receiving yards), and scoring (Harder, 58 points). Schreiner was selected by the Associated Press (AP) as a first-team All-American. Schreiner and Harder both received first-team All-Big Ten honors. Harder received the team's most valuable player award. Quarterback Tom Farris was the team captain.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1941 season, the average attendance at home games was 26,212.

1942 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1942 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players selected to the All-Big Ten Conference teams selected by the Associated Press (AP) and United Press (UP) for the 1942 Big Ten Conference football season. Dave Schreiner was the only unanimous pick with 18 points (representing all nine first-team picks); Julius Franks and Dick Wildung followed with 17 points each.

1942 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1942 Big Ten Conference football season was the 47th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference (also known as the Western Conference) and was a part of the 1942 college football season.

The 1942 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, led by head coach Paul Brown, compiled a 9–1, led the Big Ten in scoring offense (33.7 points per game), won the conference championship, and was ranked No. 1 in the final AP Poll. The Buckeyes' only loss was by a 17–7 score against Wisconsin at Camp Randall Stadium. Tackle Charles Csuri received the team's most valuable player award. Halfback Les Horvath went on to win the 1943 Heisman Trophy.

Wisconsin, under head coach Harry Stuhldreher, compiled an 8–1–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points per game allowed), and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. The Badgers played Notre Dame to a 7–7 and suffered its sole loss on the road against Iowa. End Dave Schreiner was a consensus first-team All-American and received the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the most valuable player in the conference.

Michigan, under head coach Fritz Crisler, compiled a 7–3 record and was ranked No. 9 in the final AP Poll. Two Michigan linemen, tackle Al Wistert and guard Julius Franks (Michigan's first African-American All-American), were selected as consensus first-team All-Americans.

1942 College Football All-America Team

The 1942 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1942. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1942 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press, (3) the United Press, (4) the All-America Board, (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Look magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, and (9) the Sporting News.

Two individuals were unanimous selections; they were Georgia halfback (and Heisman Trophy winner) Frank Sinkwich and Wisconsin end Dave Schreiner.

1942 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1942 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1942 Big Ten Conference football season. The team compiled an 8–1–1 record (4–1 against conference opponents), finished in second place in the Big Ten Conference, led the conference in scoring defense (6.8 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 3 in the final AP Poll. Harry Stuhldreher was in his seventh year as Wisconsin's head coach.The Helms Athletic Foundation selected Wisconsin as the 1942 national champion, giving the program its only national championship. Ohio State, a team that Wisconsin defeated, was selected as national champion in the AP Poll.The team played its home games at Camp Randall Stadium. During the 1942 season, the average attendance at home games was 29,026.

1943 NFL Draft

The 1943 National Football League Draft was held on April 8, 1943, at the Palmer House Hotel in Chicago, Illinois. This draft is the first NFL draft not to produce a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Alan Ameche

Alan Ameche (; June 1, 1933 – August 8, 1988), nicknamed "The Iron Horse", or simply "The Horse", was an American football player who played six seasons with the Baltimore Colts in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and won the Heisman Trophy during his senior season in 1954. He was elected to the Pro Bowl in each of his first four seasons in the league. He is famous for scoring the winning touchdown in overtime in the 1958 NFL Championship Game against the New York Giants, labeled "The Greatest Game Ever Played."

With colleague and former Colts teammate Gino Marchetti, Ameche founded the Gino's Hamburgers chain. He also founded the Baltimore-based Ameche's Drive-in restaurants.

Bugle (newspaper)

The Bugle or Bugle-American (the original name) was an underground newspaper based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Distributed throughout the state from September 1970 to 1978, it was published weekly for most of that time for a total of 316 issues. The Bugle, an early example of the alternative newsweekly genre, was less radical than the city's other underground newspaper, Kaleidoscope, although it was not viewed that way by the local media such as the Milwaukee Journal and Milwaukee Sentinel.The paper was founded by Denis Kitchen, Dave Schreiner, Mike Hughes, Mike Jacobi and Judy Jacobi, some of them former journalism students at the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee. The tongue-in-cheek name was inspired by that of the Daily Bugle, the fictional newspaper published by Spider-Man-hater J. Jonah Jameson. Because of Kitchen's interest in underground comics, the Bugle featured a comics page with the works of both local artists like Kitchen, Jim Mitchell, Don Glassford, Bruce Walthers, and Wendel Pugh, and work by nationally known artists like Robert Crumb. For a time Kitchen syndicated these strips to about fifty college and alternative papers around the country.On February 22, 1975, the Bugle's office on Bremen Street on the East Side was firebombed. About the same time, the car of Kaleidoscope's editor John Kois was also bombed. The newspaper's next issue, delayed a week, was aided by financial support from such fans as George Reedy, Leonard Cohen and Bryan Ferry. Neither bombing was ever solved; many suspected involvement by the Milwaukee Police Department's Red Squad.Veterans of the Bugle (in addition to Kitchen) include Tony Capaccio (later editor of Jane's Defence Weekly), Greg Kot (the Chicago Tribune's pop music critic since 1990), Rob Fixmer (later technology news editor of The New York Times), Gary Peterson, and Peter James Spielmann of the Associated Press.

Camp Randall Stadium

Camp Randall Stadium is an outdoor stadium in Madison, Wisconsin, located on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus. It has been the home of Wisconsin Badgers football since 1895, with a fully functioning stadium since 1917. The oldest and fifth largest stadium in the Big Ten Conference, Camp Randall is the 41st largest stadium in the world, with a seating capacity of 80,321.

Chicago Tribune Silver Football

The Chicago Tribune Silver Football is awarded by the Chicago Tribune to the college football player determined to be the best player from the Big Ten Conference. The award has been presented annually since 1924, when Red Grange of Illinois was the award's first recipient.The winner of the Silver Football is determined by a vote of Big Ten head football coaches. Each coach submits a two-player ballot with a first and second choice, and coaches cannot vote for players on their own team. The first-place vote receives two points and the second-place vote receives one point.Coaches and media of the Big Ten also make annual selections for additional individual honors.

Dan Steffan

Dan Steffan is an American cartoonist and writer who has contributed to both mainstream and underground publications for several decades.

Death Rattle (comics)

Death Rattle was an American black-and-white horror anthology comic book series published in three volumes by Kitchen Sink Press in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s. Death Rattle is not related to the Australian one-shot comic Death Rattle, published by Gredown in c. 1983.Starting out as an underground comix homage to classic horror comics like Tales from the Crypt, Death Rattle did not fall under the purview of the Comics Code, allowing the title to feature stronger content — such as profanity, nudity, and graphic violence — than other comparable horror titles.

Lancaster, Wisconsin

Lancaster is a city in and the county seat of Grant County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 3,868 at the 2010 census.

Schreiner

Schreiner is a family name of German origin.

Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame

The Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame honors distinguished members of Wisconsin's sports history. The Hall of Fame hosts several annual events, including an induction ceremony to honor new members, nomination luncheons, speaker series breakfasts and more. Bronze commemorative plaques honoring the members of the Wisconsin Athletic Hall of Fame, including Hank Aaron, Vince Lombardi, Oscar Robertson, Bart Starr and others, are displayed in the Wisconsin Athletic Walk of Fame promenade in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Badgers football

The Wisconsin Badgers football team is a division I college football program. The Badgers have competed in the Big Ten Conference since its formation in 1896. They play their home games at Camp Randall Stadium, the fourth-oldest stadium in college football. Wisconsin is one of 26 College football programs to win 700 or more games. Wisconsin has had two Heisman Trophy winners, Alan Ameche and Ron Dayne, and have had Eleven former players inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame. As of December 27, 2018, the Badgers have an all-time record of 705–495–53.

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