Dave Redding

Dave Redding was an Assistant Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Green Bay Packers.

Biography

A native of Holdenville, Oklahoma, Redding has one daughter, Taylor. He attended the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where he was a three-year letterman on the Nebraska Cornhuskers football team.

Coaching career

Redding's first coaching position was as a graduated assistant with the Cornhuskers in 1976. The following year, he became the first Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Washington State Cougars. Later he also became the first Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Missouri Tigers and the Cleveland Browns. He later served as Strength and Conditioning Coach of the Kansas City Chiefs from 1989 to 1997, the Washington Redskins in 2001, and the San Diego Chargers from 2002 to 2006. Redding joined the Packers in 2009 as strength and conditioning coordinator, and in 2010, he was an assistant strength and conditioning coach for the Packers; Redding retired on February 21, 2011.[1]

Redding was inducted in the USA Strength and Conditioning Coaches Hall of Fame in 2006.[2]

References

  1. ^ Packers Announce Retirement Of Dave Redding
  2. ^ Green Bay Packers: Dave Redding
1984 Cleveland Browns season

The 1984 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 35th season with the National Football League. At the season's mid-way point, head coach Sam Rutigliano was fired after starting 1–7. He was replaced by defensive coordinator Marty Schottenheimer, who went 4–4 to finish the season. (Schottenheimer would coach the Browns until 1988, guiding the Browns to a .620 winning percentage in his tenure with the team.)

1985 Cleveland Browns season

The 1985 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 36th season with the National Football League.

In Marty Schottenheimer's first full year as head coach, the Browns bounced back from a horrible 5–11 season in 1984 to make the playoffs, despite a .500 season. Rookie quarterback Bernie Kosar led the Browns' offense; Ozzie Newsome's 62 receptions earned him a trip to the Pro Bowl; Earnest Byner and Kevin Mack each rushed for over 1,000 yards.

In the Divisional Playoffs, the Browns led the Miami Dolphins 21–3 in the third quarter, but in a scene that would be repeated 4 more times in the 1980s, the Browns collapsed down the stretch as the Dolphins came back to score three touchdowns to win the game 24–21.

In 2004, Football Outsiders named the 1985 Browns as one of the "worst playoff teams ever":

Opponents outscored them 287–294, and they were blown out in two of their last three games (31–13 by the Seahawks and 38–10 by the Jets). They took a 21–3 lead over the Dolphins in the playoffs, only to watch Dan Marino and company score 21 unanswered points to win the game.

The 1985 Browns are probably best known for having two 1,000-yard rushers in Earnest Byner and Kevin Mack. Despite that impressive feat, the Browns were only fourth in the AFC in team rushing yards. They were 13th in the conference in passing yards, thanks to rookie [quarterback] Bernie Kosar and journeyman Gary Danielson. What that team did very well was play defense and take advantage of a weak division. The Browns swept the 5–11 Oilers and split with the 7–9 Bengals and Steelers. A 28–21 win in Week 15 against the Oilers proved to be the division capper: Kosar threw three TDs to open up a 28–7 lead, and the defense withstood a Warren Moon comeback.

Until 2011, Cleveland's .500 winning percentage held the record for the lowest such percentage for a division winning playoff team in a non-strike season; the record was tied by the 2008 San Diego Chargers, then broken by the 2010 Seattle Seahawks. (Incidentally, in 1985 and 2008, teams with 11–5 records – Denver in 1985, New England in 2008—missed the playoffs.)

1986 Cleveland Browns season

The 1986 Cleveland Browns season was the team’s 37th season with the National Football League. The death of Don Rogers, a promising young defensive back who was preparing to enter his third season in the NFL, cast a black cloud over the team as it prepared for the 1986 season.

Cleveland won their first postseason game since 1969, and for the first time in franchise history, the Browns reached the AFC Championship Game, where they would eventually fall to the Denver Broncos, in the game famous for “The Drive.” It would be the first of three AFC Championship games that the Browns would reach in four seasons, all losses to Denver. It remains the best post-merger Browns season as of 2017.

1987 Cleveland Browns season

The 1987 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 38th season in the National Football League.

Led by another 3,000-yard season from Bernie Kosar, the Browns captured their third-straight AFC Central crown. In the divisional playoffs, against the Indianapolis Colts at Municipal Stadium, the Browns routed the Colts 38–21 to advance to their second-straight AFC Championship Game. For the second year in a row, the Browns were matched up against the Denver Broncos for a trip to Super Bowl XXII. The Browns fell behind early at Mile High Stadium, as the Broncos roared out to a big halftime lead. However, the Browns scored 30 points in the second half, and drove down the field in the late fourth quarter with a chance to score a game-tying touchdown. With 1:12 left in the game, RB Earnest Byner was stripped of the ball at the 2-yard line by Broncos' defensive back Jeremiah Castille in a play since dubbed The Fumble. Denver ran down the clock and took an intentional safety with 8 seconds left, and the Browns fell 38–33. Denver returned to the Super Bowl for a second straight year at the expense of the Browns.

1989 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1989 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 20th season in the National Football League, the 30th overall and the first under head coach Marty Schottenheimer and general manager Carl Peterson. They improved on their 4-11-1 record from 1988 and finished with an 8-7-1 record.

The Chiefs did not qualify for the playoffs in for the third straight year but did send four players to the Pro Bowl.

1990 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1990 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 21st season in the National Football League, the 38th as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 31st overall. they improved from an 8-7-1 record to an 11–5 record and Wild Card spot in the 1991 playoffs. In Marty Schottenheimer's first playoff appearance with the Chiefs, they lost to the Miami Dolphins 17–16 in the Wild Card round. Starting with the home opener, the Chiefs began an NFL-record 18-straight seasons with every home game sold out. The streak was finally broken in the final home game of the 2009 Kansas City Chiefs season versus Cleveland.

1992 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1992 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 23rd season in the National Football League and the 33rd overall. The Chiefs matched their 10–6 record from 1991, but were shut out by the San Diego Chargers 17–0 in the Wild Card round.

During the season; the Chiefs wore a “WWD” patch on their jerseys in tribute to vice president of player personnel Whitey Dovell, who died in May 1992.

1993 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1993 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 24th season in the National Football League and the 34th overall. They improved on their 10-6 record from 1992 and won the AFC West and with an 11-5 record. Kansas City advanced all the way to the AFC Championship before losing to the Buffalo Bills 30–13, which started the Chiefs' NFL record 8 game playoff losing streak. It would be 22 years before the Chiefs would win another playoff game.The season marked the first for new quarterback Joe Montana, who was acquired through a trade with the San Francisco 49ers and running back Marcus Allen from the Los Angeles Raiders, both winners of five Super Bowl championships combined. This would be the last time until 2018 that the Chiefs would appear in the AFC Championship game or win a home playoff game.

1994 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1994 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 25th season in the National Football League, the 32nd as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 35th overall. They failed to improve their 11-5 record from 1993 and finishing with a 9–7 record and Wild Card spot in the 1994–95 playoffs. The Chiefs lost to the Miami Dolphins 27–17 in the Wild Card round. Alongside celebrating the NFL's 75th anniversary season. Future Hall of Fame quarterback Joe Montana retired following the season.

1995 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1995 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 26th season in the National Football League, the 33rd as the Kansas City Chiefs and the 36th overall. The team improved on their 9-7 from 1994 and finished the regular season with a 13–3 record and the AFC West division championship, However, the Chiefs suffered a detrimental loss in the 1995-96 AFC playoffs when Placekicker Lin Elliott missed three crucial field goals, which gave the Indianapolis Colts an upset win.

1996 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1996 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 27th season in the National Football League, and the 37th overall. Following the Chiefs' devastating loss to the colts in the playoffs the year before, the Chiefs failed to improve their 13-3 record from 1995 and finishing 9–7 record and second-place finish in the AFC West. Despite having the team being predicted as one of the eventual winners of Super Bowl XXXI by Sports Illustrated, the team missed the playoffs for the first time since 1989.

1997 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1997 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 28th season in the National Football League, and the 38th overall.

The Chiefs finished with a 13–3 record and as AFC West division champions. The season is best remembered for the Rich Gannon–Elvis Grbac quarterback controversy which brewed throughout the entire season and arguably cost the Chiefs a victory in the playoffs. The Chiefs were beaten by division rival and eventual Super Bowl champions, the Denver Broncos, in the 1998 playoffs. 1997 was the final season that the Chiefs would appear in the playoffs during the 1990s and for the next several seasons, they fell out of contention. They would return to the playoffs in 2003.

This was the last season that Marty Schottenheimer would coach the team into the playoffs, with the loss to Denver in the Divisional round 14-10 capping off many years of disappointing playoff losses. This was also the final season for future Hall of Fame running back Marcus Allen.

2001 Washington Redskins season

The 2001 Washington Redskins season was the franchise’s 70th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 65th representing Washington, D.C.

Despite a very poor start to the season at 0–5, with some speculation that they might win as few as two games, the Redskins began a 5-game winnings streak, and by week 14 were 6–6 and in the midst in the NFC playoff hunt. However, despite outplaying their next two opponents, the Redskins dropped two critical games to the Eagles and Bears, eliminating them from playoff contention, though they would finish the season on a high note at 8–8.

This was also the season the Redskins debut the stitch up authentic name and numbers on the jerseys.

2002 San Diego Chargers season

The 2002 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 33rd season in the National Football League (NFL), its 43rd overall and the first under head coach Marty Schottenheimer. Their stadium, Qualcomm Stadium, hosted Super Bowl XXXVII at the end of the season, but the Chargers' failure to secure a playoff berth marked the 18th straight time that the Super Bowl did not include the team in whose region the game was being played. Their division was reduced to four teams at the start of the season with the Seattle Seahawks moving to the NFC. Despite starting the season at 4–0 and ending 6–2 halfway through, the Chargers only went 2–6 in their last 8 games.

2003 San Diego Chargers season

The 2003 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 34th season in the National Football League (NFL), its 44rth overall and the second under head coach Marty Schottenheimer. They finished the campaign last in their division with only four wins and earned the #1 pick in the 2004 NFL draft. They played one “home” game during the season, against the Miami Dolphins, at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona where the Arizona Cardinals played, due to the Cedar Fire. The team declined from the previous season, as the Chargers won four games and surrendered the second most points per game (27.6), trailing only the Arizona Cardinals during the season. On April 11, 2003 General manager John Butler died and A.J. Smith took over the position for the next 10 seasons, the team wore a patch with the initials "JB" to commemorate John Butler

2005 San Diego Chargers season

The 2005 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's 36th season in the National Football League, and the 46th overall. The chargers failed to improve on their 12–4 record in 2004, and finished the campaign 9–7 and 3rd overall in their division, missing out on the playoffs for the first time since 2003. Outside linebacker Shawne Merriman was named rookie of the Year at the end of the season.

Despite missing the playoffs the Chargers humiliated some of the best teams in the NFL such as the defending Super Bowl champions New England Patriots (41–17) and the previously undefeated Indianapolis Colts (26–17; ending the prospect of a perfect season). Following the season, Drew Brees would sign as a free agent with the New Orleans Saints.

Art Hindle

Arthur Hindle (born July 21, 1948) is a Canadian actor and director.

David Boston

David Byron Boston (born August 19, 1978) is a former professional football wide receiver. He was originally drafted by the Arizona Cardinals eighth overall in the 1999 NFL Draft. During David Boston's college years he played football at Ohio State. Boston also played for the San Diego Chargers, Miami Dolphins, and Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Boston became a Pro Bowl selection with the Cardinals in 2001. The final years of Boston's career and his immediate post-football life was plagued by several arrests and other legal issues.

Steve Nielsen

Steve Nielsen (born 2 July 1964) is a British engineer working in Formula One motor racing.

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