Dave Koslo

George Bernard "Dave" Koslo (né Koslowski,[1] March 31, 1920 – December 1, 1975) was a professional baseball left-handed pitcher over parts of twelve seasons (1941–1942, 1946–1955) with the New York Giants, Baltimore Orioles and Milwaukee Braves.

On April 18, 1947, Koslo gave up Jackie Robinson's first major league home run, hit in the third inning.[2]

Koslo was the National League ERA champion in 1949 with New York. For his career, he compiled a 92–107 record in 348 appearances, with a 3.68 ERA and 606 strikeouts.

Koslo was the winning pitcher in the opening game of the 1951 World Series and the losing pitcher of its final game.

Koslo served in World War II as a member of the 13th Airborne Division of the United States Army from 1943 to 1945.[3] After recovering from a stroke in 1957, he worked in sales.[4] He was born in Menasha, Wisconsin, and later died there at the age of 55.[5]

Dave Koslo
DaveKoslo1948bowman
Pitcher
Born: March 31, 1920
Menasha, Wisconsin
Died: December 1, 1975 (aged 55)
Menasha, Wisconsin
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 12, 1941, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
April 14, 1955, for the Milwaukee Braves
MLB statistics
Win–loss record92–107
Earned run average3.68
Strikeouts606
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Kondy, W. Kornel (Summer 2004). "Dave Koslo" (PDF). pgsmn.org. Polish Genealogical Society of Minnesota. p. 6. Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  2. ^ Eig, Jonathan (2007). Opening Day: The Story of Jackie Robinson's First Season. New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 68. ISBN 978-0-7432-9461-4.
  3. ^ "Baseball in Wartime – Dave Koslo". BaseballinWartime.com. Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  4. ^ Dave Koslo at the SABR Baseball Biography Project, by Gregory H. Wolf , Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  5. ^ "Dave Koslo". The Post-Crescent. December 2, 1975. p. 28. Retrieved February 1, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.open access

External links

1941 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1941 New York Giants season was the franchise's 59th season. The team finished in fifth place in the National League with a 74-79 record, 25½ games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1942 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1942 New York Giants season was the franchise's 60th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 85-67 record, 20 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1946 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1946 New York Giants season was the franchise's 64th season. The team finished in eighth place in the National League with a 61-93 record, 36 games behind the St. Louis Cardinals.

1947 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1947 New York Giants season was the franchise's 65th season. The team finished in fourth place in the National League with an 81-73 record, 13 games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers. It was the first season to be broadcast on television, with WNBT acting as the official team television broadcast partner.

1950 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1950 New York Giants season was the franchise's 68th season. The team finished in third place in the National League with an 86-68 record, 5 games behind the Philadelphia Phillies.

1950 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1950 Philadelphia Phillies won the National League pennant by two games over the Brooklyn Dodgers. Nicknamed the "Whiz Kids" because of the youth of their roster, they went on to lose the World Series to the New York Yankees in four straight games.

1951 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1951 New York Giants season was the franchise's 69th season and saw the Giants finish the regular season in a tie for first place in the National League with a record of 96 wins and 58 losses. This prompted a three-game playoff against the Brooklyn Dodgers, which the Giants won in three games, clinched by Bobby Thomson's walk-off home run, a moment immortalized as the Shot Heard 'Round the World. The Giants, however, lost the 1951 World Series to the New York Yankees in six games.

1951 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1951 Philadelphia Phillies finished in fifth place. The team had won the 1950 National League pennant but in the United Press' annual preseason poll of sportswriters, only 18 out of 168 writers picked the team to repeat as pennant winners; the Giants received 81 votes and the Dodgers 55. Those two teams wound up tied, with the Phillies 23 games behind.

1951 World Series

The 1951 World Series matched the two-time defending champion New York Yankees against the New York Giants, who had won the National League pennant in a thrilling three-game playoff with the Brooklyn Dodgers on the legendary home run by Bobby Thomson (the Shot Heard 'Round the World).

In the Series, the Yankees showed some power of their own, including Gil McDougald's grand slam home run in Game 5, at the Polo Grounds. The Yankees won the Series in six games, for their third straight title and 14th overall. This would be the last World Series for Joe DiMaggio, who retired afterward, and the first for rookies Willie Mays and Mickey Mantle.

This was the last Subway Series the Giants played in. Both teams would meet again eleven years later after the Giants relocated to San Francisco. They have not played a World Series against each other since. This was the first World Series announced by Bob Sheppard, who was in his first year as Yankee Stadium's public address announcer. It was also the first World Series to be televised nationwide, as coaxial cable had recently linked both coasts.

1952 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1952 New York Giants season was the franchise's 70th season. The team finished in second place in the National League with a 92-62 record, 4½ games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1953 New York Giants (MLB) season

The 1953 New York Giants season was the franchise's 71st season. The team finished in fifth place in the National League with a 70-84 record, 35 games behind the Brooklyn Dodgers.

1954 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1954 Baltimore Orioles season was the franchise's 54th season (it was founded as the Milwaukee Brewers in 1901, then played as the St. Louis Browns from 1902–53) but its first season as the Baltimore Orioles. The season involved the Orioles finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 54 wins and 100 losses, 57 games behind the AL champion Cleveland Indians in their first season in Baltimore. The team was managed by Jimmy Dykes, and played its home games at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium.

1954 Milwaukee Braves season

The 1954 Milwaukee Braves season was the second in Milwaukee and the 84th overall season of the franchise.

1955 Milwaukee Braves season

The 1955 Milwaukee Braves season was the third in Milwaukee and the 85th overall season of the franchise.

Hopkinsville Hoppers

The Hopkinsville Hoppers were a baseball team in Hopkinsville, Kentucky for some years between 1905 and 1954.

It was in the Kentucky–Illinois–Tennessee League 1905, 1910–1914, 1916, 1922–1923, 1935–1942, 1946–1954.

It was affiliated with Milwaukee Brewers (AA) 1937–1939; Chicago Cubs 1946; Philadelphia A's 1953–1954.

Madison Blues (baseball)

The Madison Blues were a minor league baseball team based in Madison, Wisconsin, USA, that played between 1940 and 1942 in the Illinois–Indiana–Iowa League.

Menasha, Wisconsin

Menasha is a city in Calumet and Winnebago counties in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The population was 17,353 at the 2010 census. Of this, 15,144 were in Winnebago County, and 2,209 were in Calumet County. The city is located mostly in Winnebago County; only a small portion is in the Town of Harrison in Calumet County. Doty Island is located partially in Menasha. The city's name comes from the Winnebago word meaning "thorn" or "island". In the Menominee language, it is known as Menāēhsaeh, meaning "little island". Menasha is home to the Barlow Planetarium and Weis Earth Science Museum, both housed at the University of Wisconsin-Fox Valley.

Rube Novotney

Ralph Joseph "Rube" Novotney (August 5, 1924 – July 16, 1987) was an American professional baseball player, a catcher who appeared in 22 Major League games for the 1949 Chicago Cubs. The native of Streator, Illinois, stood 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and weighed 187 pounds (85 kg) and attended the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

Novotney's partial season with the 1949 Cubs included two standout back-to-back games against the New York Giants at Wrigley Field. On June 25, Novotney singled twice in three at bats, driving in three runs and providing the margin in a 4–1 Cub victory. The following day, he was a perfect three-for-three off the Giants' Dave Koslo, but New York prevailed, 6–2.In his MLB career, Novotney made 18 total hits (including two doubles and one triple) in 67 at-bats.

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