Dave Hampton

David Hampton (born May 7, 1947) is a former professional American football running back in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers, Atlanta Falcons, and Philadelphia Eagles.

Dave Hampton
No. 25,43
Position:Running back
Personal information
Born:May 7, 1947 (age 71)
Akron, Ohio
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school:Ann Arbor (MI)
College:Wyoming
NFL Draft:1969 / Round: 9 / Pick: 220
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:4,536
Average:4.0
Touchdowns:25
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Hampton was part of a star-studded backfield which helped Wyoming post a 10–0 regular season record in 1967 and a number six national ranking. They played LSU in the Sugar Bowl and led after the first half, but lost 20–13. Other future pros in Wyoming's backfield that season included senior Jim Kiick, who was part of two Super Bowl championship teams with the Miami Dolphins, and Vic Washington, who helped the San Francisco 49ers win three consecutive NFC West division titles (1970-72).

Professional career

Hampton was selected by the Green Bay Packers in the ninth round of the 1969 NFL/AFL Draft in late January,[1][2] in what turned out to be general manager Vince Lombardi's last official function with the club before becoming coach and general manager of the Washington Redskins the next week.[3] Hampton was expected to fill the shoes of retired legends Jim Taylor and Paul Hornung, but in three years with Green Bay, he, along with the rest of the Packers' aging offense, struggled.

His best success came with the Atlanta Falcons, where he was traded prior to the 1972 season. In his first year with the team, Hampton surpassed the 1,000-yard rushing yard mark during the Falcons' final game of the season against the Kansas City Chiefs. However, he was tackled for a six-yard loss on the following play and ended the season with 995 yards. In 1973, he had another chance to get a 1,000-yard rushing season, but he ended up three yards shy. After missing most of the 1974 season due to injury, he rushed for 1,002 yards in 1975 and received the NFL Comeback Player of the Year Award.

References

  1. ^ Bledsoe, Terry (January 29, 1969). "Packers draft to fill gaps". Milwaukee Journal. p. 13.
  2. ^ "Pro football draft selections". Milwaukee Journal. January 30, 1969. p. 14.
  3. ^ Johnson, Chuck (February 5, 1969). "Packer players remember Lombardi for heavy hand". Milwaukee Journal. p. 15, part 2.

External links

1968 Wyoming Cowboys football team

The 1968 Wyoming Cowboys football team represented the University of Wyoming in the 1968 college football season. Led by seventh-year head coach Lloyd Eaton, they were members of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) and played their home games on campus at War Memorial Stadium in Laramie.

The Cowboys had a record of 7–3, won a third consecutive WAC title, and outscored their opponents 242 to 118.

1969 Green Bay Packers season

The 1969 Green Bay Packers season was their 51st season overall and their 49th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–6 record under coach Phil Bengtson, earning them a 3rd-place finish in the Central division.

1970 Green Bay Packers season

The 1970 Green Bay Packers season was their 52nd season overall and their 50th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 6–8 record earning them a third consecutive third-place finish in the four-team NFC Central division. It was the third and final season for Phil Bengtson as head coach; he resigned shortly after the season ended.

1971 Green Bay Packers season

The 1971 Green Bay Packers season was their 53rd season overall and their 51st season in the National Football League (NFL). The club posted a 4–8–2 record under first-year coach Dan Devine, earning them a fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division.

1972 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1972 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's seventh year in the National Football League (NFL). The team failed to improve on their previous season's output of 7–6–1, finishing 7–7 and failing to reach the playoffs. Standing at 7–5 the Falcons traveled to San Francisco with the NFC West division title on the line. However, the Falcons were never in the game and saw their playoff hopes end with a 20–0 shutout loss. Facing the Kansas City Chiefs in their final game of the season, Running Back Dave Hampton surpassed the 1,000-yard mark. However, a play later he is thrown for a six-yard loss and ends the season with 995 yards, as the Falcons lose and finish 7–7.

1973 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1973 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's eighth year in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved on their previous season’s output of 7–7 and achieved their best record until 1980, but failed to reach a maiden playoff berth due to an unexpected home loss to a Cardinals team that had won only one of its last ten and was playing an unknown quarterback, Gary Keithley. Keithley completed only ten of thirty-two passes, but the Cardinals’ rushing game was completely unexpected and along with six field goals from Jim Bakken destroyed the Falcons after they had led 10-0.A highlight for the 1973 Falcons was defeating the Vikings when that team was 9–0 and looking at emulating the previous season‘s Dolphins’ perfect season. Despite the Falcons’ success between 2008 and 2012, this was the last time the Falcons defeated the last unbeaten NFL team until they defeated the 14-0 Carolina Panthers in week 16 of the 2015 season.

1974 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1974 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's ninth year in the National Football League (NFL). After coming close to their maiden postseason appearance the previous season and finishing with a best-to-date 9–5 record despite an upset loss to the Cardinals, the Falcons traded star cornerback Ken Reaves to obtain in-demand guard Royce Smith in a widely criticized move. During the strike-affected pre-season, they beat the Eagles 23 to 7 in a rain-soaked match, before losing to the Raiders, 28-16. Soon afterwards the Falcons lost key offensive tackle Bill Sandeman for the entire season with a slipped disc in his back.Along with a form lapse from quarterback Bob Lee and an injury to running back Dave Hampton, this destroyed the Falcons’ offense. The 1974 Falcons scored 111 points with a mere twelve touchdowns, the lowest total in franchise history, and the second lowest by any team in a fourteen-game NFL season after the infamous “Zero Gang” offense of the 1977 Buccaneers who were shut out six times in fourteen games. Their failure to score more than seventeen points in any game has been equalled since only by the infamous offense of the 1992 Seahawks.

The Falcons sacked long-serving head coach Norman van Brocklin after being thrashed by the Miami Dolphins and having heard demands from fans to make that move.

1975 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1975 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's tenth year in the National Football League (NFL). With the first overall pick of the NFL draft, the Falcons selected quarterback Steve Bartkowski out of the University of California. However, the pick would do them no good as the Falcons slumped to another miserable 4–10 record and missed the playoffs for the 10th straight season. This was also the first and only full season for head coach Marion Campbell, as he was hired to coach the final 6 games of the previous season and was fired 5 games into the following season.

1975 NFL season

The 1975 NFL season was the 56th regular season of the National Football League. It was the first NFL season without a tie game. The league made two significant changes to increase the appeal of the game:

The surviving clubs with the best regular season records were made the home teams for each playoff round. Previously, game sites rotated by division.

The league pioneered the use of equipping referees with wireless microphones to announce penalties and clarify complex and/or unusual rulings to both fans and the media.Instead of a traditional Thanksgiving Day game hosted by the Dallas Cowboys, the league scheduled a Buffalo Bills at St. Louis Cardinals contest. This was the first season since 1966 that the Cowboys did not play on that holiday.

The season ended with Super Bowl X when the Pittsburgh Steelers repeated as champions by defeating the Dallas Cowboys 21–17 at the Orange Bowl in Miami.

1976 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1976 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's 11th year in the National Football League (NFL). The season saw the Falcons attempting to improve on their 4-10 record from 1975. However, they were only able to match the record, as they finished the 1976 season with an identical 4-10 record and missed the playoffs for the 11th straight season. After a 1-4 start to the season, head coach Marion Campbell was fired by general manager Pat Peppler, who himself would close out the season as the interim head coach and finish the season with a 3-6 record.

1981 Super Bowl of Poker

The Super Bowl of Poker (also known as Amarillo Slim's Super Bowl of Poker or SBOP) was the second most prestigious poker tournament in the world during the 1980s. While the World Series of Poker was already drawing larger crowds as more and more amateurs sought it out, the SBOP "was an affair limited almost exclusively to pros and hard-core amateurs."Prior to 1979, the only high dollar tournament a person could enter was the WSOP. 1972 WSOP Main Event Champion and outspoken ambassador for poker, Amarillo Slim saw this as an opportunity. "The World Series of Poker was so successful that everybody wanted more than one tournament," he said. Slim called upon his connections and friendships with poker's elite to start a new tournament in the February 1979. Slim modelled his SBOP after the WSOP with several events and a $10,000 Texas Hold'em Main Event.

One of the principal differences between the WSOP and the SBOP was the prize structure. The WSOP's prize structure was flat ensuring more people received smaller pieces of the prize pool. The SBOP typically used a 60-30-10 payout structure. In other words, only the first three places received money and generally in the ratio of 60% to first place, 30% to second place, and 10% to third. This payment schedule predominated the SBOP for the first 5 years of the event, but as the event grew the number of payouts increased while keeping the payout schedule top heavy.

1982 Super Bowl of Poker

The Super Bowl of Poker (also known as Amarillo Slim's Super Bowl of Poker or SBOP) was the second most prestigious poker tournament in the world during the 1980s. While the World Series of Poker was already drawing larger crowds as more and more amateurs sought it out, the SBOP "was an affair limited almost exclusively to pros and hard-core amateurs."Prior to 1979, the only high dollar tournament a person could enter was the WSOP. 1972 WSOP Main Event Champion and outspoken ambassador for poker Amarillo Slim saw this as an opportunity. "The World Series of Poker was so successful that everybody wanted more than one tournament," he said. Slim called upon his connections and friendships with poker's elite to start a new tournament in the February 1979. Before the SBOP had developed a reputation of its own, many of the most respected names in poker attended the tournament "more to support Slim and take advantage of the very fat cash games the event would obviously inspire." Slim modelled his SBOP after the WSOP with several events and a $10,000 Texas Hold'em Main Event.

One of the principal differences between the WSOP and the SBOP was the prize structure. The WSOP's prize structure was flat ensuring more people received smaller pieces of the prize pool. The SBOP typically used a 60-30-10 payout structure. In other words, only the first three places received money and generally in the ratio of 60% to first place, 30% to second place, and 10% to third. This payment schedule predominated the SBOP for the first 5 years of the event, but as the event grew the number of payouts increased while keeping the payout schedule top heavy.

A Place Called Love Land

A Place Called Love Land is the fourth studio album by American recording artist Raheem DeVaughn. The album was released on September 3, 2013, by Mass Appeal Entertainment, INgrooves and Fontana Distribution.

Furby

Furby is an American electronic robotic toy released in 1998 by Tiger Electronics. It resembles a hamster or owl-like creature and went through a period of being a "must-have" toy following its holiday season launch, with continual sales until 2000. Over 40 million Furbies were sold during the three years of its original production, with 1.8 million sold in 1998, and 14 million in 1999. Its speaking capabilities were translated into 24 languages.

Furbies were the first successful attempt to produce and sell a domestically-aimed robot. A newly purchased Furby starts out speaking entirely "Furbish", the unique language that all Furbies use, but is programmed to start using English words and phrases in place of Furbish over time. This process is intended to resemble the process of learning English. The updated Emoto-Tronic Furby, with voice-recognition and more complex facial movements, was sold by Hasbro between 2005–2007. They released another updated Furby with LCD eyes and a mobile app for the holiday season in 2012.

List of National Football League annual kickoff return yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League kickoff returners who have led the regular season in kickoff return yards each year.

List of Wyoming Cowboys in the NFL Draft

The Wyoming Cowboys have had 82 players drafted to the NFL since the first draft in 1936. Of those 82 players, 4 have been selected to a Pro Bowl, and 7 have been a part of a Super Bowl or NFL Championship winning team. Currently, 5 of those draftees still play in the NFL.

The highest drafted Cowboy is Josh Allen, taken 7th overall in 2018 Draft. The most Cowboys ever taken in a draft is 5, in 1968.

Razorwyre

Razorwyre is a speed/power metal band from Wellington, New Zealand. Formed in 2009 under the name Gaywyre, they released an EP entitled "Coming Out" under that name before changing their name to Razorwyre in 2010. The "Coming Out" EP was re-released on cassette in 2011 by Infernö Records, limited to 100 copies. That release led to a deal with the same label to release their debut full-length, "Another Dimension" in 2012.They were scheduled to perform at the Keep It True XVI festival in Germany in 2013, but cancelled their performance because their drummer broke both of his arms.

Rich Moore (American football)

Richard Clifton "Rich" Moore (born April 26, 1947 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football defensive tackle in the National Football League who played 20 games for the Green Bay Packers. In 1969, the Green Bay Packers used the 12th pick in the 1st round of the 1969 NFL Draft to sign Moore out of Villanova University. He had previously been named as a first team tackle on the East Coast Athletic Conference all-conference team in 1968, his senior season at Villanova. Moore went on to play for two seasons with the Packers. He tore an Achilles tendon in a win over the Philadelphia Eagles in the 1970 season, and had surgery shortly thereafter, putting him out for the season. After trying him on offense during training camp in 1971, the Packers traded him to the New England Patriots for linebacker John Bramlett in late July 1971. However, Moore was unable to play for the Patriots in 1971 due to injury. He was then released by the Patriots in June 1972.Moore's only known statistic is a single fumble recovery in the 1969 season. His son, Brandon Moore, later played offensive tackle for the New England Patriots from 1993 through 1995.

The Fundamentals (album)

The Fundamentals is the eleventh studio album by American rapper Juvenile. The album was released on February 18, 2014, by Rap-A-Lot Records.

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