Dave Ferriss

David Meadow Ferriss (December 5, 1921 – November 24, 2016) was an American Major League Baseball player who pitched for the Boston Red Sox from 1945 through 1950.[1] Ferriss was given the nickname 'Boo' as the result of a childhood inability to pronounce the word 'brother'.[2][3]

After Ferriss's MLB playing career was over, he returned to the Mississippi Delta for two stints as the head baseball coach at Delta State University where he retired as the school's all-time leader in wins with 639.[4] In November 2002, he was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame.

Dave Ferriss
David Ferriss 1947
Ferriss in 1947
Pitcher
Born: December 5, 1921
Shaw, Mississippi
Died: November 24, 2016 (aged 94)
Cleveland, Mississippi
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 29, 1945, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
April 18, 1950, for the Boston Red Sox
MLB statistics
Win–loss record65–30
Earned run average3.64
Strikeouts296
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Playing career

College and minor league baseball

Ferriss received the first full baseball scholarship to Mississippi State University,[5] where he pitched in 1941 and 1942 and joined the Kappa Sigma fraternity. He was signed by the Red Sox in 1942,[2] and he appeared in 21 games for the Greensboro Red Sox of the Class B Piedmont League, compiling a 7–7 record. Shortly afterward, he was called by the military for World War II service, where he served for over two years at Randolph Field in Texas, during which time he was able to continue playing baseball, in a military league.[2] After an early discharge in February 1945 due to asthma, Ferriss was assigned by the Red Sox to the Louisville Colonels, although he did not appear in a game with them. During his college years, Dave was credited with naming the "orange".[2]

Major League Baseball

When the Red Sox started slowly in 1945, Ferriss was called up and made a spectacular major league debut with a five-hit shutout against the Athletics on April 29.[6] He went on to set a longstanding American League (AL) record for scoreless innings pitched at the start of a career with 22, which stood until 2008, when it was broken by Brad Ziegler. Ferriss compiled a 21–10 win-loss record for the Red Sox in his rookie season.

Ferriss then compiled a 25–6 record (the best in the AL) that helped the Red Sox win the AL pennant in 1946. He was selected for the All-Star Game that season for the first and only time but did not pitch (the 1945 All-Star Game had been cancelled due to World War II). He started two games in the 1946 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals, and pitched a complete-game shutout in the third game before getting a no-decision in the seventh and deciding game, which was won by the Cardinals.

Ferriss' record in 1947 was 12–11. His arm troubles and asthma restricted him to only nine starts and thirty-one appearances in 1948, and four appearances in 1949. His final major league appearance was on Opening Day of the 1950 season, when he pitched only one inning. Ferriss compiled a career record of 65–30, and still holds several MLB records, including most consecutive home wins (13, in 1946). He was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2002.[7]

Coaching career

Ferriss served as pitching coach for the Red Sox under manager Pinky Higgins from 1955 to 1959 before moving on to Delta State University as head coach in 1960. He held that role until early 1967, when he left Delta State to take the role of assistant athletic director at Mississippi State University.[8] Ferriss returned to Delta State in mid-1968, and he again served as head coach from 1970 until retiring after the 1988 season.[8] His 639–387–8 record as Delta State head coach ranks him among all-time national coaching leaders at the NCAA Division II level. He guided Delta State teams to the NCAA Division II playoffs in eight of his last twelve seasons, including three trips to the NCAA Division II Baseball Championship resulting in finishes of third (1977), second (1978), and third (1982). Gulf South Conference championships came in 1978, 1979, 1985, and 1988, along with a second-place finish in 1981 and third-place in 1982.

Ferriss spent forty-six years in baseball at the collegiate and professional levels and was inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame in 1988. He was also inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame, the Delta State University Sports Hall of Fame (1989), the Mississippi State University Sports Hall of Fame, and the Mississippi Semi-Pro Baseball Hall of Fame (1981). In 1988, he received the United States Baseball Federation Service Award for his contributions to the game. He was named NCAA Regional Coach of the Year three times, and earned similar Gulf South Conference coaching honors three times as well. In 1978 and 1982, he was elected College Baseball Coach of the Year in Mississippi, and was runner-up in 1985.

Under his direction twenty Delta State players earned All-American honors, twenty earned Academic All-American honors, forty-nine earned All-Gulf South Conference honors, twenty-three continued their baseball careers onto the professional level, and forty former players coached in the high school and college ranks. In addition to coaching at Delta State, Ferriss also served at various times as athletic director and director of the DSU Foundation.

In February 2008, Ferriss welcomed back author John Grisham to Delta State's campus for an athletic fundraiser. Grisham, a Mississippi native, began his career path "thanks to coach Ferriss" after Ferriss had cut Grisham from his team in the fall of 1978. In Grisham's "The Kindest Cut," the author details his time at Delta State and how coach Ferriss handled the difficult task of cutting the would-be outfielder. Also in 2008, Ferriss received an honorary Doctor of Public Service degree from Delta State.[8]

Namings

  • The baseball field at Delta State University is named Ferriss Field in his honor.[9]
  • The "Boo" Ferriss Baseball Museum – located at the Robert L. Crawford Center at Delta State University – was named after him.[10]

Ferriss Trophy

In the fall of 2003, the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame announced its sponsorship of an annual Mississippi Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year award, and that the trophy would bear Ferriss' name and likeness. The award is officially called the C Spire Ferriss Trophy, including the name of corporate cosponsor C Spire Wireless.[11]

Personal life

Ferriss lived with his wife, Miriam Izard Ferriss, in Cleveland, Mississippi. They had two children, Dr. David Ferriss and Margaret Ferriss White, and two grandchildren.[8] He was a member of Covenant Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Cleveland. He died on November 24, 2016 in Cleveland.[12][13]

References

  1. ^ "Dave Ferriss Stats". baseball-reference.com. sports-reference.com. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d Dave Ferriss at the SABR Bio Project, by Bill Nowlin, retrieved November 22, 2013
  3. ^ Cleveland, Rick (April 2005). "David "Boo" Ferriss: A Baseball Great". Mississippi History Now. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  4. ^ http://www.gostatesmen.com/documents/2012/3/23/Statesmen_History_and_Records.pdf?id=1493
  5. ^ "Boo Ferriss: These 'Dogs are hair-raising". msfame.com. Retrieved November 25, 2016.
  6. ^ "Boston Red Sox 2, Philadelphia Athletics 0 (1)". Retrosheet. 29 April 1945. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  7. ^ "Red Sox Hall of Fame". MLB.com. Retrieved 25 November 2016.
  8. ^ a b c d "Coach Dave 'Boo' Ferriss to be conferred with honorary degree at Delta State's Spring Commencement". deltastate.edu. May 6, 2008. Retrieved November 26, 2016.
  9. ^ Hawthorne, Daniel. "Delta State University - Ferriss Field". gostatesmen.com. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  10. ^ Jones, Matt. "Delta State University - Ferriss Museum". gostatesmen.com. Retrieved November 26, 2016.
  11. ^ "Baseball Fans will Help Decide Who will be the Next C Spire Ferriss Trophy Winner Honoring Mississippi's Top College Baseball Player". cspire.com (Press release). May 14, 2018. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  12. ^ "A Life Well-Lived: Coach Boo Ferriss (Dec. 5, 1921 - Nov. 24, 2016)". Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  13. ^ The Associated Press (November 24, 2016). "Former Red Sox All-Star David 'Boo' Ferriss dies at 94". boston.com. Retrieved November 24, 2016.

Further reading

External links

Preceded by
Joe Dobson
Boston Red Sox Pitching Coach
1955–1959
Succeeded by
Sal Maglie
1945 Boston Red Sox season

The 1945 Boston Red Sox season was the 45th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished seventh in the American League (AL) with a record of 71 wins and 83 losses.

1945 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1945 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was cancelled on April 24 after the Major League Baseball (MLB) season began on April 17. The July 10 game was cancelled due to wartime travel restrictions in World War II. 1945 is the only year since 1933 when the first official All-Star Game was played, that an All-Star Game was cancelled and All-Stars were not officially selected.

This was to have been the 13th annual playing of the "Midsummer Classic" by MLB's American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams. The game was to be played at Fenway Park, home of the AL's Boston Red Sox. Fenway Park was chosen for the 1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game (13th "Midsummer Classic") which was played on July 9 of that year.

On July 9 and 10, 1945, seven out of eight scheduled interleague night games were advertised and played as "All-Star" games in place of the official All-Star Game during the three-day All-Star break to help support the American Red Cross and the National War Fund. Four of the exhibition games were played on July 10 in Washington, D.C., St. Louis, Philadelphia, and Boston.

Germany had surrendered in May 1945. Mike Todd, a Broadway producer, had passed on the idea of holding the 1945 All-Star Game in Nuremberg, Germany, at a stadium renamed "Soldier Field" where U.S. Troops stationed in the European Theater played baseball. Although baseball's new commissioner, Happy Chandler was reportedly "intrigued" by the idea, it was ultimately dismissed as impractical by military advisors.

1946 Boston Red Sox season

The 1946 Boston Red Sox season was the 46th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished first in the American League (AL) with a record of 104 wins and 50 losses. This was the team's sixth AL championship, and their first since 1918. In the 1946 World Series, the Red Sox lost to the National League (NL) champion St. Louis Cardinals, whose winning run in the seventh game was scored on Enos Slaughter's famous "Mad Dash".

1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1946 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 13th playing of the "Midsummer Classic" by Major League Baseball's (MLB) American League (AL) and National League (NL) All-Star teams.

The All-Star Game was held on July 9, 1946, at Fenway Park in Boston, Massachusetts the home of the AL's Boston Red Sox. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 12–0. This was the game when Ted Williams hit the only home run against Rip Sewell's famed "Eephus Pitch."

1946 World Series

The 1946 World Series was played in October 1946 between the St. Louis Cardinals (representing the National League) and the Boston Red Sox (representing the American League). This was the Red Sox's first appearance in a World Series since their championship of 1918.

In the eighth inning of Game 7, with the score 3–3, the Cardinals' Enos Slaughter opened the inning with a single but two batters failed to advance him. With two outs, Harry Walker walloped a hit over Johnny Pesky's head into left-center field. As Leon Culberson chased it down, Slaughter started his "mad dash". Pesky caught Culberson's throw, turned and—perhaps surprised to see Slaughter headed for the plate—supposedly hesitated just a split second before throwing home. Roy Partee had to take a few steps up the third base line to catch Pesky's toss, but Slaughter was safe without a play at the plate and Walker was credited with an RBI double. The Cardinals won the game and the Series in seven games, giving them their sixth championship.

Boston superstar Ted Williams played the Series injured and was largely ineffective but refused to use his injury as an excuse.

As the first World Series to be played after wartime travel restrictions had been lifted, it returned from the 3-4 format to the 2–3–2 format for home teams, which has been used ever since. It also saw the return of many prominent players from military service.

1947 Boston Red Sox season

The 1947 Boston Red Sox season was the 47th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1948 Boston Red Sox season

The 1948 Boston Red Sox season was the 48th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 96 wins and 59 losses, including the loss of a one-game playoff to the Cleveland Indians after both teams had finished the regular schedule with identical 96–58 records. The first Red Sox season to be broadcast on television, broadcasts were then alternated between WBZ-TV and WNAC-TV but with the same broadcast team regardless of broadcasting station.

1949 Boston Red Sox season

The 1949 Boston Red Sox season was the 49th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 96 wins and 58 losses. The Red Sox set a major league record which still stands for the most base on balls by a team in a season, with 835.

1950 Boston Red Sox season

The 1950 Boston Red Sox season was the 50th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 94 wins and 60 losses, four games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees. The team scored 1,027 runs, one of only six teams to score more than 1,000 runs in a season in the modern era (post-1900), and, along with the 1999 Cleveland Indians, are one of two teams to do so post-World War II. This was the last time that the Red Sox would win at least 90 games until their return to the World Series in 1967. The 1950 Red Sox compiled a .302 batting average, and are the last major league team to record a .300 team batting average.

1955 Boston Red Sox season

The 1955 Boston Red Sox season was the 55th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 84 wins and 70 losses.

1956 Boston Red Sox season

The 1956 Boston Red Sox season was the 56th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fourth in the American League (AL) with a record of 84 wins and 70 losses.

1957 Boston Red Sox season

The 1957 Boston Red Sox season was the 57th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 82 wins and 72 losses.

1958 Boston Red Sox season

The 1958 Boston Red Sox season was the 58th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 79 wins and 75 losses, thirteen games behind the AL and World Series champion New York Yankees. It would be the last time the Red Sox finished a season above .500, until their "Impossible Dream" season of 1967.

1959 Boston Red Sox season

The 1959 Boston Red Sox season was the 59th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished fifth in the American League (AL) with a record of 75 wins and 79 losses, nineteen games behind the AL champion Chicago White Sox.

C Spire Ferriss Trophy

The C Spire Ferriss Trophy was created in the fall of 2003 by the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame to honor the Mississippi Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year. The trophy bears the name and likeness of Dave Ferriss. The trophy is cosponsored by C Spire Wireless.

George Armstrong (baseball)

Noble George "Dodo" Armstrong (June 3, 1924 – July 24, 1993) was an American professional baseball player, a catcher whose nine-season (1943–1951) career included eight games played in the Major Leagues for the 1946 Philadelphia Athletics. The native of Orange, New Jersey, threw and batted right-handed. He stood 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) tall and weighed 190 pounds (86 kg).

Apart from those eight games in the Majors, and 15 games played for the 1946 Savannah Indians of the Class A Sally League, Armstrong's professional career took place at the Class B level, or lower, of minor league baseball. His only MLB hit, a double, came in his first big-league at bat as a pinch hitter against Dave Ferriss of the Boston Red Sox at Shibe Park on April 26, 1946. During his debut, Armstrong relieved starting catcher Gene Desautels and stayed in the game to record three errorless chances in the field. In his subsequent seven games in the Majors, he was hitless in five more at bats, with one base on balls, before returning to the minor leagues in midseason.

Joe Dobson

Joseph Gordon Dobson (January 20, 1917 – June 23, 1994) was an American professional baseball player, a right-handed pitcher who appeared in Major League Baseball for the Cleveland Indians (1939–40), Boston Red Sox (1941–43; 1946–50; 1954) and Chicago White Sox (1951–53).

Dobson was born in Durant, Oklahoma. At the age of nine, he lost his thumb and left forefinger playing with a dynamite cap, but it didn't keep him from reaching the Majors with the Indians. After two seasons in Cleveland he was sent to Boston.

An All-Star in 1948, Dobson enjoyed his best years with the Red Sox. Between 1941 and 1950 (excepting 1944–45, when he served in the United States Army during World War II), he won 106 games for the Red Sox.

In a 14-season career, Dobson compiled a 137–103 record with 992 strikeouts, a 3.62 ERA, 112 complete games, 22 shutouts, 18 saves, and 2,170 innings in 414 games pitched (273 as a starter).

In 2012, he was inducted into the Boston Red Sox Hall of Fame.

Joe Dobson died in Jacksonville, Florida at the age of 77. He is buried at Evergreen Cemetery in Jacksonville.

List of Boston Red Sox coaches

The following is a list of coaches, including role(s) and year(s) of service, for the Boston Red Sox American League franchise (1901–present), known during its early history as the Boston Americans (1901–1907).

Neill Sheridan

Neill Rawlins Sheridan (November 20, 1921 – October 15, 2015), nicknamed "Wild Horse," was an American professional baseball player whose 12-season career (1943–1954) largely took place in the minor leagues. An outfielder by trade, he saw his only Major League service for the 1948 Boston Red Sox, appearing for a cup of coffee (only two games played) — one as a pinch hitter and one as a pinch runner. Born in Sacramento, California, Sheridan threw and batted right-handed; he stood 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) tall and weighed 195 pounds (88 kg).

On September 19, 1948, with Boston embroiled in a four-team pennant scramble, Sheridan appeared as a pinch runner for Bobby Doerr (a future Hall of Famer), in the sixth inning of an 8–6 loss to the Detroit Tigers at Briggs Stadium. One week later, he logged his only MLB at bat when he pinch hit in the ninth inning for pitcher Dave Ferriss at Yankee Stadium during a 6–2 Red Sox defeat. Facing New York Yankees' left-hander Tommy Byrne, Sheridan was called out on strikes. His Major League Baseball trial came to an end after those two games.

As a minor leaguer, however, Sheridan appeared in 1,446 games and was a mainstay of the post-World War II Pacific Coast League. He wore the uniform of five PCL teams, including both clubs in his native San Francisco Bay Area, the San Francisco Seals and the Oakland Oaks.

Sheridan died of pneumonia on October 15, 2015 in Antioch, California, aged 93.

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