Dave Concepción

David Ismael Concepción Benitez (born June 17, 1948), is a former Venezuelan shortstop in Major League Baseball. He played with the Cincinnati Reds for nineteen years (1970–1988) including their back-to-back World Series championship seasons in 1975 and 1976. The Reds later retired jersey number 13 in honor of Concepción's contributions to the team.[1]

David Concepción
Dave Concepcion - Cincinnati Reds
Shortstop
Born: June 17, 1948 (age 71)
Ocumare de la Costa, Venezuela
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 6, 1970, for the Cincinnati Reds
Last MLB appearance
September 15, 1988, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Batting average.267
Hits2,326
Home runs101
Runs batted in950
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early life

Concepción was born in Ocumare de la Costa, Aragua State, Venezuela, the son of a truck driver[2] and his wife, Ernestina.[3] He attended Agustin Codazzi High School. After high school, he worked as a bank teller[4] and played part-time for the local Tigres de Aragua baseball team. His coach, Wilfredo Calviño, was also a Cincinnati Reds' scout, and Calviño signed Concepción to a Reds' contract in 1967.[2]

Career

Following the steps of his childhood heroes Chico Carrasquel and Luis Aparicio, Jr., Concepción, originally drafted as a pitcher, came out of Venezuela to become one of the Reds' and the National League's greatest all-time shortstops. He made his big-league debut on April 6, 1970, starting at shortstop and going 0-for-4 as the Reds defeated the Montreal Expos, 5-1.[5] He went 0-for-4 again the next day against the Los Angeles Dodgers before getting his first hit on April 8, a seventh-inning double off Dodgers pitcher (and future Reds teammate) Fred Norman.[6]

In his first three seasons, Reds manager Sparky Anderson played him part-time, sharing duties with Woody Woodward and Darrel Chaney. In one of those appearances, in 1971, he was the only team member to reach base safely when the Reds were no-hit by the Philadelphia Phillies' Rick Wise; a sixth-inning walk spoiled what would have been a perfect game. In 1973, Concepción blossomed, both at bat and in the field, being named the starting shortstop. On May 9, in a Reds 9–7 victory over the Philadelphia Phillies, Johnny Bench hit three home runs and drove in seven runs against pitcher Steve Carlton. It was the second time that Bench smashed three homers against Carlton in a game. However, a Concepción two-run tie-breaker homer in the ninth, off Barry Lersch, was the game-winner. Concepción had been named to the NL All-Star team, but on July 22, two days before the game he dislocated his knee and broke his leg(sliding into third base after moving from first base with Denis Menke base hit against the Expos in the bottom of the seventh inning at Riverfront, fracturing the fibula of left leg) and missed the second half of the year. At this time, he was batting .287, with 8 HRs, 46 RBI, 39 runs, 18 doubles, three triples and 22 stolen bases.

198009-012WillieMcCoveyLastCandlestick
Willie McCovey attempts to tag Cincinnati Reds' shortstop Dave Concepción out at first base in McCovey's final game at Candlestick Park, Copyright 1980 Sheldon Dunn

Concepción returned in 1974 and played 160 games. He enjoyed his best overall season, batting .281, with 14 HR and 82 RBI, as well as winning his first of five Gold Glove Awards.

By 1975, Concepción joined Pete Rose, Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan, Tony Pérez, Ken Griffey, Sr., George Foster and César Gerónimo in the famous "Great Eight" starting lineup of The Big Red Machine that would help the Reds win the next two World Series titles. Even after Concepción had established himself in the major leagues as a star shortstop, he continued to play winter ball in Venezuela, helping to improve his batting. After his .274, 5, 49 totals in the 1975 Major League season, Concepción posted marks of: .281, 9, 69 (1976); .271, 8, 64 (1977); .301, 6, 67 (1978); .281, 16, 84 (1979); .260, 5, 77 (1980); .306, 5, 67 (1981); and .287, 5, 53 (1982).

On July 13, 1982, the first All-Star Game outside of the United States was held at Montreal's Olympic Stadium. Concepción hit a two-run homer to help the National League to a 4–1 win (the NL's 11th straight victory and 19th in the last 20 contests). Concepción was named the game's Most Valuable Player.

Later in his career, Concepción worked with Tony Pérez and perfected the one-bounce throw to first base. Concepción was the first shortstop to use this method to take advantage of the smooth artificial turf at Riverfront Stadium and other parks in the National League.

Hampered by age, an elbow injury and shoulder surgery in 1982, Concepción had consecutive sub-par seasons from 1983–84. Grooming Barry Larkin as his successor, he became a dependable handyman at all four infield positions. He was replaced by Larkin in 1986, only 44 games away from Larry Bowa's NL record for shortstops.

In 1988, which would be his 19th and final season with the Reds, manager Pete Rose sent Concepción in to pitch 1.1 innings in Dodger Stadium late in a blow-out game. He gave up two hits, no runs, and struck out one batter. The Reds released Concepción after the 1988 season. He attempted a 20th Major League season in 1989, trying out for the California Angels,[7] but he failed to make the roster and retired from playing.[2]

Personal life

After retiring in 1989, he served as manager of the Tigres de Aragua team in Venezuela.

Concepción resides with his wife, Delia, in Urbanizacion El Castaño, a community in Maracay, Venezuela[8] at the base of the mountains near Henri Pittier National Park. They have three grown children, sons David Alejandro and David Eduardo, and daughter Daneska.[2] Concepción owns a farm as well as a trucking business.[3]

CincinnatiReds13
Dave Concepción's number 13 was retired by the Cincinnati Reds in 2007.

On August 25, 2007, the Cincinnati Reds held a pre-game ceremony to retire Concepción's number 13.

Joining him were several other all-time Reds greats whose numbers were retired, including former teammates Tony Pérez, Johnny Bench, Joe Morgan and manager Sparky Anderson as well as former teammates Ken Griffey and George Foster. Concepción has said that he originally chose that number to honor his mother, Ernestina, who was born in 1913.[9] It was the first occasion in Major League history that the number 13 was retired by a team.

His number 13 was also retired by the Venezuelan team for which he played 20 years of winter ball, Tigres de Aragua of Maracay.[3] In 2014, he was named vice president of the club.[8] He is a member of the Caribbean Series Hall of Fame.[3]

In 2014, Concepción returned to Cincinnati to serve as grand marshal of the annual opening day Findlay Market Parade, and later he and his successor at shortstop for the Reds, Barry Larkin, threw the ceremonial first pitches prior to the Reds' season opener.[8]

Articles

  • Reds' Brass Excited Over Concepción, Fast-Rising Infield Whiz. The Sporting News, by Earl Lawson – November 8, 1969 (Vol. 168, Issue 17) -- p. 39
  • The Making of Dave Concepción. Baseball Digest, by Si Burick – August, 1974 (Vol. 33, Issue 8) -- p. 40, 3 page(s)
  • Friday the 13th. Sports Illustrated, by Robert H. Boyle – June 23, 1980 (Vol. 52, Issue 26) -- p. 13, 14
  • Dave Concepción Best in the Business. Boys' Life, by Jim Brosnan – September, 1975 (Vol. 65, Issue 9) -- p. 20, 4 page(s)

Further reading

  • The Greatest Shortstops Of All Time, by Donald Honig – p. 80, 6 page(s). Dubuque, Ia: Wm. C. Brown Publishers, 1992
  • Baseball's Dream Team., by John Thorn – Dave Concepción: "Senor Slick" – p. 40, 10 page(s). New York: Ace Tempo Books, 1982

See also

References

  1. ^ "Concepción's jersey retired". espn.com. Retrieved 2007-08-25.
  2. ^ a b c d David L. Porter (1995). Biographical Dictionary of American Sports: 1992–1995 supplement for baseball, football, basketball, and other sports. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 56–. ISBN 978-0-313-28431-1.
  3. ^ a b c d beisbol. "Dave Concepcion Reds SS Interview – 1-800-BEISBOL – 1-800-BEISBOL". www.1800beisbol.com.
  4. ^ Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) (1 April 2014). The Great Eight: The 1975 Cincinnati Reds. U of Nebraska Press. pp. 144–. ISBN 978-0-8032-5340-7.
  5. ^ "Montreal Expos at Cincinnati Reds Box Score, April 6, 1970 – Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  6. ^ "Cincinnati Reds at Los Angeles Dodgers Box Score, April 8, 1970 – Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com.
  7. ^ PENNER, MIKE (1989-03-07). "Angel Notebook : Concepción Is Trying to Prove Reds Wrong". Los Angeles Times. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  8. ^ a b c "Concepcion recalls time with 'kidnap cops'".
  9. ^ "Concepcion's jersey retired". ESPN.com. Retrieved 2016-03-04.

External links

Preceded by
Gary Carter
National League Player of the Month
April, 1981
Succeeded by
Art Howe
1973 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1973 Cincinnati Reds season consisted of the Reds winning the National League West with a Major League-best record of 99–63, 3½ games ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers, before losing the NLCS to the New York Mets in five games. The Reds were managed by Sparky Anderson, and played their home games at Riverfront Stadium.

The Reds were coming off a devastating loss in seven games to the underdog Oakland Athletics in the 1972 World Series. The offseason didn't start well for the Reds. In the winter, a growth was removed from the lung of Cincinnati's star catcher, Johnny Bench. While Bench played the entire 1973 season, his power numbers dropped from 40 home runs in 1972 to 25 in '73. He never again reached the 40 homer mark, something he accomplished in two of the three seasons prior to the surgery.

Coming into the season, the defending NL Champion Reds were still favored to win the strong NL West against the likes of the Houston Astros, the Los Angeles Dodgers, and the San Francisco Giants. The Reds' lineup returned virtually intact, with the exception of third base where the Reds tried to make a third baseman out of rookie Dan Driessen, a solid hitter (.301 average) who had played mostly first base in the minor leagues. With Tony Pérez fully entrenched at first base, the Reds wanted to get Driessen's bat in the lineup and his playing time was at the expense of the anemic hitting Denis Menke (.191), although the Reds were sacrificing defense with Driessen at the hot corner. The other change was at shortstop, where Dave Concepción emerged from a 1972 timeshare with Darrel Chaney to full-time starter, finally realizing his potential in his fourth year in the majors. Concepción was outstanding both at bat and in the field and was named to the NL All-Star team. But two days before the mid-summer classic on July 22, in a game against the Montreal Expos, Concepción broke his ankle sliding into third base after moving from first base on a Menke base hit, and missed the second half of the season. Concepción was batting .287, with eight home runs, 46 RBI, 39 runs scored and 22 stolen bases, all career highs despite missing almost half the season.

The Reds had other hurdles to overcome. Cincinnati's pitching ace, Gary Nolan (15–5, 1.99 ERA in '72), suffered from a sore arm that limited him to two starts and 10 innings pitched before it was discovered he had a torn ligament in his right elbow. The injury would force Nolan to also miss the entire 1974 season. There was also an issue with centerfielder Bobby Tolan. He slumped badly to .206, became a malcontent, and had several squabbles with members of Reds management, who were still unhappy with his 1971 basketball injury that cost him that season as well as Tolan's error in Game 7 of the 1972 World Series against Oakland that was arguably the key play in that game. Tolan went AWOL for two days in August 1973, and broke team rules by growing a beard. On September 27, the team suspended Tolan for the remainder of the season including the NLCS.

The Reds started well, and were 25–16 about a quarter of the way through the season and led the second-place Dodgers by a 1½ games on May 23. But with Tolan, Menke and Bench mired in slumps and some of the Reds starting pitchers struggling, the Reds began to flounder. Reds general manager Bob Howsam determined the Reds offense would eventually come around, but the pitching staff needed help. With Nolan sidelined indefinitely and starters Jim McGlothlin and Roger Nelson struggling, Howsam traded for San Diego Padres left-hander Fred Norman on June 12. At the time of the trade, the 5-foot-8 lefty was 1–7 for the last-place Padres, but Norman would go 12–6 in 24 starts for the Reds to provide a major boost.

The Reds were still in a slump when they met the Dodgers for a July 1, doubleheader in Cincinnati. The Reds were 39–37 and trailed the Dodgers (51–27) by 11 games. Just as they had done 12 years earlier, the Reds swept the Dodgers in a doubleheader to jumpstart their pennant hopes. In Game 1, Cincinnati's third-string catcher, Hal King, belted a game-winning, three-run home run with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning off Don Sutton to give the Reds a 4–3 victory. In Game 2, Tony Pérez singled in the game-winner off knuckleball specialist Charlie Hough in the bottom of the 10th as the Reds won 3–2. The doubleheader sweep was part of a stretch where Cincinnati won 10 of 11 games and by July 10, had cut the Dodgers' lead to 4½ games.

Both teams stayed close throughout the season, but on Aug. 29, the Reds beat Pittsburgh, 5–3, to begin a seven-game winning streak. After losing two to the Braves, the Reds began another seven-game winning streak to gain some space between the Dodgers. Los Angeles came into Cincinnati for a two-game series, Sept. 11–12, trailing the Reds by 3 games with 18 left on the schedule. A two-run home run by rookie Ken Griffey was the big hit in the Reds' 6–3 victory on Sept. 11, and the Reds completed the sweep the next day as Jack Billingham hurled a complete-game and, the typically poor hitter (.065 average), also belted a bases-clearing double off LA starter Claude Osteen in a 7–3 victory. The Dodgers left Cincinnati trailing by five games. On Sept. 24, the Reds beat San Diego, 2–1, to clinch their second-straight division title and third in four years. It sent the Reds to the 1973 NLCS against the New York Mets.

The Reds offense was led by Pete Rose (team-record 230 hits, 115 runs scored, an NL best .338 batting average), Joe Morgan (116 runs, 26 home runs, 82 RBI, 67 stolen bases, .290 avg.) and Perez (.314, 27, 101). Rose was voted the National League MVP, while Morgan finished fourth and Perez seventh in a vote by the Baseball Writers' Association of America.

Jack Billingham emerged as the staff ace, leading the National League in both innings pitched (293) and shutouts (7) to go with 19 victories, while young lefty Don Gullett won 11 of his last 12 decisions to finish 18–8.

Future stars Griffey and George Foster also played well in short stays with the Reds. Griffey batted .384 in 86 at bats in his major league debut, while Foster hit .282 and smacked four home runs in just 39 at bats. Journeyman third-string catcher Hal King also emerged as an unsung hero. King hit three pinch hit home runs, all of which either tied or won games late including a three-run home run off Los Angeles Dodger starter Don Sutton on July 1 to win a game for the Reds.

1975 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1975 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds dominated the league all season, and won the National League West with a record of 108–54, best record in MLB and finished 20 games ahead of the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Reds went on to win the National League Championship Series by defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates in three straight games, and the World Series in seven games over the Boston Red Sox. The Reds were managed by Sparky Anderson and played their home games at Riverfront Stadium. It was the first World Series championship for Cincinnati since 1940. The 1975 Reds are one of the few teams to consistently challenge the 1927 Yankees, what some people call the best in baseball history, for the title for the best team in MLB history. Some sources consider the 1975 Reds the greatest team to ever play baseball. But according to some sources, a lot of them put the 1927 Yankees ahead of the '75 Reds. The Reds went 64–17 at home in 1975, which is the best home record ever by a National League team, which still stands today. It is currently the second best home record in MLB history, behind the 1962 Yankees, who went 65-16.

1975 National League Championship Series

The 1975 National League Championship Series was a best-of-five match-up between the East Division champion Pittsburgh Pirates and the West Division champion Cincinnati Reds. The Reds swept the Pirates in three games and went on to win the World Series against the Boston Red Sox.

1975 World Series

The 1975 World Series of Major League Baseball was played between the Boston Red Sox (AL) and Cincinnati Reds (NL). In 2003, it was ranked by ESPN as the second-greatest World Series ever played. Cincinnati won the series in seven games.

The Cincinnati Reds recorded a franchise-high 108 victories and won the National League West division by 20 games over the Los Angeles Dodgers then defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, three games to none, in the National League Championship Series. The Boston Red Sox won the American League East division by 4½ games over the Baltimore Orioles then defeated the three-time defending World Series champion Oakland A's, three games to none, in the American League Championship Series.

Boston star left fielder Jim Rice missed both the ALCS and the World Series due to a broken hand.

The Reds won the seventh and deciding game of the series on a ninth-inning RBI single by Joe Morgan. The sixth game of the Series was a 12-inning classic at Boston's Fenway Park culminated by a game-winning home run by Carlton Fisk to extend the series to seven games.

It was the third World Series appearance by the Reds in six years, losing in 1970 to Baltimore and in 1972 to Oakland.

Oddly, this was the fourth consecutive time that a seven-game series winner (Pittsburgh 1971, Oakland 1972, Oakland 1973, Cincinnati 1975) scored fewer runs than the losing team.

1976 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1976 Cincinnati Reds season was a season in American baseball. The Reds entered the season as the reigning world champs. The Reds dominated the league all season, and won their second consecutive National League West title with a record of 102–60, best record in MLB and finished 10 games ahead of the runner-up Los Angeles Dodgers. They went on to defeat the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1976 National League Championship Series in three straight games, and then win their second consecutive World Series title in four straight games over the New York Yankees. They were the third and most recent National League team to achieve this distinction, and the first since the 1921–22 New York Giants. The Reds drew 2,629,708 fans to their home games at Riverfront Stadium, an all-time franchise attendance record. As mentioned above, the Reds swept through the entire postseason with their sweeps of the Phillies and Yankees, achieving a record of 7-0. As of 2018, the Reds are the only team in baseball history to sweep through an entire postseason since the addition of divisions.

1976 National League Championship Series

The 1976 National League Championship Series faced off the Cincinnati Reds (known for their nickname at the time, The Big Red Machine) and the Philadelphia Phillies. The Reds swept the best-of-five series in three games, winning easily in the first two games, and in their last at bat in Game 3.

Stars of the series for the Reds included batters Johnny Bench (4 for 12, HR), Dave Concepción (4 runs scored), George Foster (2 H, both home runs), Ken Griffey (5 for 13, triple), Pete Rose (6 for 14, 2 RBIs, 3 runs scored), and pitchers Don Gullett (win, 8 IP, 2 hits), Pedro Borbón (​4 1⁄3 IP, 0.00 ERA), and Pat Zachry (win, 5 IP, 3 SO).

1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1977 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 48th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 19, 1977, at Yankee Stadium in The Bronx, New York, New York the home of the New York Yankees of the American League. The game resulted in the National League defeating the American League 7–5.

The host Yankees won the World Series; the third time in history that a team hosting the All-Star Game would win the World Series in the same year. As of 2018, the 1977 Yankees were the last team to accomplish this. The previous teams to accomplish this were the 1939 New York Yankees and the 1959 Los Angeles Dodgers.

This was Yankee Stadium's third time as host of the All-Star Game, and it would be its last until 2008; the last year of the park's use by the Yankees.

1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1978 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 49th midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 11, 1978, at San Diego Stadium in San Diego, home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in a 7-3 victory for the NL.

This was the first All-Star Game to be played in San Diego. It would return in 1992 to be played in the same stadium, though it was renamed Jack Murphy Stadium by that time.

The honorary captains were Brooks Robinson (for the AL) and Eddie Mathews (for the NL).

1979 National League Championship Series

The 1979 National League Championship Series was played between the National League West champion Cincinnati Reds and the National League East champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

It was the fourth time in the 1970s that the Pirates and Reds had faced off for the pennant; Cincinnati had won all three previous meetings in 1970, 1972 and 1975.

The Pirates won the series in a three-game sweep in what would be the last postseason appearance for both franchises until 1990.

1981 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1981 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 52nd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on August 9, 1981, at Cleveland Stadium in Cleveland, Ohio, the home of the Cleveland Indians of the American League.

This was one of only two All-Star Games to be played outside the month of July (the other being the second 1959 game). The game was originally to be played on July 14, but was cancelled due to the players' strike lasting from June 12 to July 31. It was then brought back as a prelude to the second half of the season, which began the following day. At 72,086 people in attendance, it broke the stadium's own record of 69,751 set in 1954, setting the still-standing record for the highest attendance in an All Star Game.

Cleveland Stadium set a new All-Star Game record by hosting its fourth (and ultimately, final) Midsummer Classic. By the time Indians played host to the All-Star Game for the fifth time in 1997, they had moved to Jacobs Field.

1982 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1982 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 53rd midseason exhibition between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was played on July 13, 1982, at Olympic Stadium in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, home of the Montreal Expos of the National League. The game resulted in a 4–1 victory for the NL, and Cincinnati Reds shortstop Dave Concepción was named the MVP.

It is notable for being the first All-Star Game ever played outside the United States. This would be the only All-Star Game to be played in Montréal, as the Expos would leave in 2005 to become the Washington Nationals before having an opportunity to host another. Four members of the Expos were voted into the starting lineup. The flyover at the conclusion of the National Anthems was done for the first time by a national air squadron other than those from the United States Air Force or Air National Guard as the Snowbirds from the Canadian Forces Air Command flew over Olympic Stadium, marking the first of their two All-Star appearances; they would perform the flyover for the 1991 Major League Baseball All-Star Game in Toronto nine years later. It is also the last All-Star Game in which the manager of the runner-up for any league pennant managed in place of the manager of the defending league champions due to the latter's unemployment; Billy Martin of the Oakland Athletics managed in place of Bob Lemon, who had been fired by the New York Yankees, Martin's former team.

1994 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1994 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Steve Carlton.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected two, Leo Durocher and Phil Rizzuto.

Chico Carrasquel

Alfonso Carrasquel Colón, better known as Chico Carrasquel (January 23, 1926 – May 26, 2005), was a Venezuelan professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a shortstop for the Chicago White Sox (1950–1955), Cleveland Indians (1956–1958), Kansas City Athletics (1958) and the Baltimore Orioles (1959). Carrasquel was the first in a long line of Major League shortstops from Venezuela including, Luis Aparicio, Dave Concepción, Ozzie Guillén and Omar Vizquel among others. He was notable for his excellent defensive abilities and for being the first Latin American in MLB history to start in an All-Star Game.

Cincinnati Reds

The Cincinnati Reds are an American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Reds compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. They were a charter member of the American Association in 1882 and joined the NL in 1890.The Reds played in the NL West division from 1969 to 1993, before joining the Central division in 1994. They have won five World Series titles, nine NL pennants, one AA pennant, and 10 division titles. The team plays its home games at Great American Ball Park, which opened in 2003 replacing Riverfront Stadium. Bob Castellini has been chief executive officer since 2006.

For 1882–2018, the Reds' overall win-loss record is 10,524–10,306 (a 0.505 winning percentage).

Concepcion Rodriguez

Concepción Rodríguez (born September 19, 1986 in Chepo, Panama) is a Panamanian professional baseball player. He is named after Dave Concepción.

Rodríguez was a member of the Panama national baseball team at the 2009 World Baseball Classic and 2019 Pan American Games Qualifier.

Darrel Chaney

Darrel Lee Chaney (born March 9, 1948, in Hammond, Indiana) is an American former player/announcer in Major League Baseball who played for the Cincinnati Reds and Atlanta Braves from 1969 to 1979. In the early 1980s he worked for the Braves as an announcer along with Ernie Johnson, Skip Caray and Pete Van Wieren. He was on the Atlanta Braves Radio Network as well as WTBS-TV.

Chaney was a graduate of Morton High School in Hammond, Indiana, where he was a three-sport athlete and an All-American football player and was named the Northwest Indiana Times Athlete of the Year in 1966. His wife Cindy is also from Hammond and is a graduate of George Rogers Clark High School.He had several football scholarship offers from Big Ten schools but signed with Ball State University because there he could play both football and baseball. However, he was selected by the Reds in the second round of the 1966 draft and signed for a $6,000 bonus.Although a light-hitting infielder in the minor leagues, he broke through and led the Southern League with 23 home runs in 1968, earning him a spot on the Reds' roster in 1969, when he shared the shortstop position with Woody Woodward and Chico Ruiz. Chaney continued with the Reds in the 1970s but after the emergence of Dave Concepción was primarily a reserve.

He played in three World Series for the Reds' "Big Red Machine" teams, in 1970 and 1972 and on the World Series-winning team of 1975.Chaney was traded to Atlanta after the 1975 season and in 1976 batted .252 with one home run and 50 RBI as the Braves' regular shortstop. Over the next three seasons, however, he was unable to hold the job against competition from two other players, and was released at the end of the 1979 season.

In 915 career games, Chaney hit for a .217 batting average, with 14 home runs, 190 runs batted in, 237 runs scored, 458 hits, 75 doubles, 17 triples and 19 stolen bases.

Chaney is a past Chairman of the Board of the Major League Alumni Marketing (MLAM) and a Sr. Vice President of Sales and Marketing at a retail services organization. He is a Christian and a motivational speaker; Dan Hettinger has written a biography of Chaney entitled Welcome to the Big Leagues . . . Every Man's Journey to Significance. He lives in Sautee Nacoochee, Georgia with his wife Cindy.

List of Gold Glove Award winners at shortstop

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.Ozzie Smith, known as "the Wizard of Oz", has won the most Gold Glove Awards at shortstop; he captured 13 awards in his 19 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals. Omar Vizquel is second among shortstops with 11 wins; he won two with the San Francisco Giants in the National League after winning nine with the Seattle Mariners and the Cleveland Indians in the American League. Luis Aparicio won nine times at shortstop for the third-highest total, followed by Mark Belanger with eight wins. Dave Concepción and Derek Jeter have won five awards; four-time winners at shortstop include Tony Fernández and Alan Trammell. Hall of Famers who have won Gold Glove Awards at shortstop include Smith, Aparicio, Ernie Banks, Robin Yount, Barry Larkin and Cal Ripken, Jr., whose 2,632 consecutive games played earned him his "Iron Man" nickname.Vizquel made the fewest errors during a shortstop's winning season, with three in 2000; his .995 fielding percentage that season leads American League and major league shortstops, and his 2006 total of four errors is tied for the National League lead with Rey Ordóñez (1999). Ordóñez' .994 fielding percentage in 1999 leads National Leaguers in that category. Aparicio leads winners in putouts, with 305 in 1960; Concepción (1976) and Smith (1983) are tied for the National League lead with 304. Smith's 621 assists are best among all shortstops, and Belanger (552 assists in 1974) is the American League leader. Gene Alley turned 128 double plays in 1966 to lead winners in that category; Ripken leads American Leaguers, with 119 turned in 1992.

Rawlings Gold Glove Award

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as simply the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. It is also awarded to women fastpitch softball players in the National Pro Fastpitch as of 2016. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Additionally, a sabermetric component provided by Society for American Baseball Research (SABR) accounts for approximately 25 percent of the vote. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985, 2007, and 2018), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in Major League Baseball; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Sheldon "Chief" Bender

Sheldon "Chief" Bender (November 25, 1919 – February 27, 2008) was an American player and manager in minor league baseball and a scout, scouting director and farm system director in Major League Baseball who spent 64 years in the game.

Bender is most closely identified with the Cincinnati Reds, where he spent 39 years (1967–2005) as a front office executive and consultant. An associate of general manager Bob Howsam, Bender was Cincinnati's farm system director of the "Big Red Machine" era and served in that post for 22 years, 1967–88. His system produced such players as Baseball Hall of Famer Barry Larkin, Ken Griffey, Sr., Dave Concepción, Don Gullett, Eric Davis and Paul O'Neill. The Reds' minor league player of the year award is named after him.

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.