Darren Dreifort

Darren James Dreifort (born May 3, 1972) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher for the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Darren Dreifort
Pitcher
Born: May 3, 1972 (age 47)
Wichita, Kansas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 7, 1994, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
Last MLB appearance
August 16, 2004, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
Win–loss record48–60
Earned run average4.36
Strikeouts802
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early career

Dreifort played baseball in High School at Wichita Heights High School and was drafted out of High School by the New York Mets in 1990. He chose instead to attend college at Wichita State University. As a college ballplayer, Dreifort was a two-time consensus All-American and the 1993 NCAA Player of the Year. He was 26-5 with a 2.24 ERA in his career at WSU on the mound and was also a great power hitter at the plate. Darren was inducted into the Kansas Sports Hall of Fame for his performance there.

Los Angeles Dodgers

He was subsequently drafted in the 1st round (2nd overall behind Alex Rodriguez) in the 1993 Major League Baseball draft by the Los Angeles Dodgers.

Dreifort became one of only a select few players to make his professional debut in the Majors, without first appearing in a minor league game. He made his debut on April 7, 1994 against the Florida Marlins, working one scoreless inning as a relief pitcher. He appeared in a total of 27 games for the Dodgers that season, finishing 0-5 with a 6.21 ERA.

After missing the 1995 season due to injuries, Dreifort returned to the Dodgers bullpen for the 1996 and 1997 seasons, pitching effectively as a late inning setup man. He recorded his first career win on August 30, 1996 in relief against the Philadelphia Phillies. In 1997 he was very good out of the pen, finishing 5-2 with a 2.86 ERA in 48 appearances and notched 4 saves.

He transitioned to the starting rotation for the 1998 season, making his first start on April 11 against the Houston Astros at Dodger Stadium, working five innings and taking the loss. He finished the season 8-12 with an ERA of 4.00. He continued to pitch effectively in 1999 (13-13) and in 2000 turned in his best season with a 12-9 record, 4.16 ERA in 32 starts and 164 strikeouts.

A free agent after the 2000 season, Dreifort re-signed with the team, and received a five-year, $55 million contract in 2001, a large contract in spite of the fact that he had had a career record of 39-45, and a history of arm trouble. But, in 2001, with a limited free-agent pitching market, Dreifort's agent Scott Boras sold the Dodgers on the right-hander's future potential, hinting he might sign with their National League West rival, the Colorado Rockies. The Dodgers responded with the big contract.

Injuries

Dreifort's health shut him down during the very first season of the deal; he was finished in early July when he was forced to undergo elbow reconstruction surgery that kept him out until the end of 2002. With continuing arm and shoulder trouble, plus additional knee and hip trouble, Dreifort actually pitched in only three of the five years on the deal, also missing the entire 2005 season and parts of two other seasons during the life of the deal.

In 2004, after team medical personnel advised the Dodgers Dreifort could not pitch as a starter due to his injuries, Dreifort became the Dodgers' seventh inning reliever in front of setup man Guillermo Mota and closer Éric Gagné. Dreifort pitched inconsistently due to knee and hip troubles in addition to older arm and shoulder issues.

Dreifort's issues may be traceable to a degenerative condition that weakened his connective tissues, as well as a deformed femur that may have been the root of his hip problems, affecting in turn his ability to rotate his body properly, which could have affected his knees and his elbows as well.[1] He is reported to have had 22 surgeries total, 20 of them since leaving college to play professional baseball.

Dreifort retired at age 32. He is married to former sports journalist Krystal Fernandez and lives in Pacific Palisades, California. He remains involved with baseball, working as a Dodgers minor league spring training instructor.

Dreifort was inducted into the College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2009.

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]

External links

1990 Major League Baseball draft

The 1990 Major League Baseball (MLB) Draft was held in June 1990. The draft placed amateur baseball players onto major league teams. 1,487 players were distributed to 26 teams. The draft consisted of first round selections, supplemental first round selections, compensation picks, and many more rounds, in fact, it went a record 101 rounds with 40 first round selections. With a league-worst record of 63 wins and 97 losses in the 1989 MLB Season, the Atlanta Braves selected shortstop, Chipper Jones out of the Bolles School with the first pick of the draft. 9 NBA and NFL players were drafted in 1990. 7 of the first 10 picks were selected directly out of high school.

1992 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in United States team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college and high school). Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American and High School All-American teams. Baseball America selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1992 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors. This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

1993 College Baseball All-America Team

An All-American team is an honorary sports team composed of the best amateur players of a specific season for each position—who in turn are given the honorific "All-America" and typically referred to as "All-American athletes", or simply "All-Americans". Although the honorees generally do not compete as a unit, the term is used in U.S. team sports to refer to players who are selected by members of the national media. Walter Camp selected the first All-America team in the early days of American football in 1889. In 1950, the American Baseball Coaches Association (ABCA) selected its first All-American baseball team. It has since chosen All-American teams and a player of the year for each division (National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, Division II, Division III, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, junior college and high school). Collegiate Baseball selects All-American, Freshman All-American and High School All-American teams. Baseball America magazine selects pre-season and post-season All-American teams and College Player of the Year honorees.Various organizations selected All-American lists of the best players for the 1993 NCAA Division I college baseball season. The ABCA, the magazine Baseball America, and Collegiate Baseball were the NCAA-sanctioned selectors. This list only includes players selected to the post-season All-American first team for each selector. However, many All-American selections choose second, third, etc. teams from the remaining eligible candidates.

1993 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1993 Dodgers improved on the dismal 1992 season finishing fourth in the Western Division of the National League. This was in part thanks to this year's Rookie of the Year winner, catcher Mike Piazza. Piazza set rookie records with 35 home runs and 112 RBI. He also hit two home runs on the last day of the season as the Dodgers knocked their longtime rival the Giants out of playoff contention with a 12-1 victory at Dodger Stadium.

1993 Major League Baseball draft

The 1993 Major League Baseball draft began with first round selections on June 3, 1993. Alex Rodriguez was selected first overall by the Seattle Mariners. Other notable draftees included Chris Carpenter, Torii Hunter, Jason Varitek, Scott Rolen, future NFL Hall of Famer Marshall Faulk, and Heisman Trophy winner Charlie Ward.

1994 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1994 Los Angeles Dodgers season was the 36th season of the franchise. The Dodgers were leading the National League's Western Division in the 1994 season when a players strike halted the season.

1997 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1997 Los Angeles Dodgers season, under manager Bill Russell, was a season in American baseball. It was competitive all season long before finally fading down the stretch; the Dodgers finished in second place behind their longtime rivals, San Francisco Giants, in the Western Division of the National League. The edition of the Dodgers had, for the second time in team history (and for the first time since 1977), four players crack the 30 home run barrier: Mike Piazza led the team with 40, Eric Karros and Todd Zeile hit 31 each, and Raul Mondesi hit 30.

1998 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1998 season saw the sale of the franchise from Peter O'Malley to the Fox Entertainment Group take effect. The new corporate executives would quickly anger Dodger fans when they bypassed General Manager Fred Claire and made one of the biggest trades in franchise history. They traded All-Star catcher Mike Piazza and starting third baseman Todd Zeile to the Florida Marlins for a package that included Gary Sheffield.

The team on the field performed poorly under all the stress and soon Fox fired Claire and manager Bill Russell, replacing them with former Manager Tommy Lasorda, who was appointed interim GM and Minor League manager Glenn Hoffman who took over for Russell. The team limped along to finish in third place in the National League West and more changes were in the offing for the following season.

1999 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 1999 season started with a new management team; Kevin Malone became the team's General Manager and Davey Johnson was selected to be the new Dodgers Manager. Looking to make a splash, Malone exclaimed "There is a new Sheriff in town" as he took over the reins and made a splash by signing starting pitcher Kevin Brown to a huge long contract. However, the team struggled to a third-place finish in the Western Division of the National League.

1999 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1999 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 117th season in the history of the franchise.

2000 Los Angeles Dodgers season

In 2000, the Dodgers set a club record for home runs with 211, led by Gary Sheffield, who tied Duke Snider's single-season club mark with 43. Eric Karros became the L.A. Dodger all-time leader with his 229th home run and Dave Hansen set a Major League record with seven pinch-hit home runs. Kevin Brown led the league in E.R.A. with 2.58 and rookie pitcher Matt Herges started the season 8-0, the first pitcher since Fernando Valenzuela to open the season with eight straight victories. The Dodgers won 86 games, but failed to make the post-season, finishing second in the Western Division of the National League. Manager Davey Johnson was fired after the season and replaced with bench coach Jim Tracy.

2001 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2001 season saw Jim Tracy take over as the Manager, after serving as the Bench coach the previous two seasons. The Dodgers won 86 games, finishing third in the Western Division of the National League, six games behind the eventual World Series champion Arizona Diamondbacks. This was their last season to be broadcast by KTLA (5).

Shawn Green had his best season, hitting a Dodger-record 49 home runs and also setting L.A. records for extra-base hits (84) and total bases (358). Paul Lo Duca became the full-time catcher and led the team with a .320 batting average and Jeff Shaw became the Dodgers all-time leader in saves, with 129.

2003 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2003 season was a turbulent period as News Corporation (Fox) was seeking to sell the team. Nevertheless, the Dodgers fell just short of a Wild Card berth, winning 85 games, finishing second in the Western Division of the National League. The Dodgers pitching staff led baseball in earned run average, Éric Gagné became the first Dodger to earn the NL Cy Young Award since 1988 as he converted all 55 of his save opportunities. Shawn Green set a new L.A. Dodger single season record with 49 doubles and Paul Lo Duca had a 25-game hitting streak.

2004 Los Angeles Dodgers season

The 2004 season brought change to the Dodgers as the sale of the franchise to developer Frank McCourt was finalized during spring training. McCourt promptly dismissed General Manager Dan Evans and hired Paul DePodesta to take over the team. That led to a flurry of trade activity as the new group attempted to rebuild the Dodgers in their image.

Despite it all, the Dodgers managed to finish the season in first place in the Western Division of the National League and won their first post season game since 1988. However they lost the NL Division Series 3-1 to the St. Louis Cardinals.

Krystal Fernandez

Krystal Fernandez (born November 11, 1971) is an American sports journalist. She joined Fox Sports Radio in March 2004 as the morning update anchor and also serves as a sports/feature reporter for KTTV/Fox 11 TV in Los Angeles. She was released from Fox Sports Radio on January 20, 2009.

On May 5, 2009 Dan LeBatard reported on his show on 790 the Ticket (WAXY-AM) that Krystal will join Jorge Sedano as the new host of 790's morning show in Miami, FL. Fernandez left this show at the end of September 2009 to be closer to her Los Angeles roots and boyfriend, former Los Angeles Dodgers pitcher, Darren Dreifort. (http://www.staatalent.com/Headlines/09/09/25white.php)

Prior to joining Fox, she was a sports reporter and anchor for a number of radio stations in Southern California. Fernandez is the sideline reporter for the Gender Bowl. She is the youngest of six kids, and has four brothers and one sister. Fernandez resides in the Greater Los Angeles area.

In September 2010, Krystal Fernandez married her boyfriend and former Los Angeles Dodger Pitcher Darren Dreifort.

List of Wichita State University people

The following is a list of notable people associated with Wichita State University, located in the American city of Wichita, Kansas.

Missouri Valley Conference Hall of Fame

The Missouri Valley Conference Hall of Fame was established in 1997 in celebration of the league's 90th anniversary. It was established to honor on an annual basis the great players, coaches and administrators in Missouri Valley Conference history. The MVC Hall of Fame is housed in the Scottrade Center in St. Louis.

Rotary Smith Award

The Rotary Smith Award was created in 1988 to honor the most outstanding college baseball player of the year. The award was founded by the Greater Houston Sports Association. In 1996, the Rotary Club of Houston joined the award committee. Prior to the 2004 season, the award was succeeded by the Roger Clemens Award, honoring the most outstanding college baseball pitcher.

Wichita State Shockers baseball

The Wichita State Shockers baseball team represents Wichita State University in the sport of baseball. The Wichita State Shockers compete in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) and in the American Athletic Conference after 72 seasons in the Missouri Valley Conference.The Shockers have made the College World Series seven times, winning the national championship in 1989. Wichita State has the fourth highest winning percentage in NCAA Division I baseball history, trailing only Texas, Florida State, and Miami (FL).

Missouri Valley Conference Baseball Pitcher of the Year
Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

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