Darren Daulton

Darren Arthur Daulton (January 3, 1962 – August 6, 2017), nicknamed "Dutch",[1] was an American professional baseball catcher who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies (1983, 19851997) and Florida Marlins (1997). While with the Phillies, Daulton was a three-time MLB All-Star and won the 1992 Silver Slugger Award. He won the 1997 World Series with the Marlins.[1]

Darren Daulton
2012 08 10 023 Phillies Darren Daulton
Daulton in 2012
Catcher
Born: January 3, 1962
Arkansas City, Kansas
Died: August 6, 2017 (aged 55)
Clearwater, Florida
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 25, 1983, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
September 28, 1997, for the Florida Marlins
MLB statistics
Batting average.245
Home runs137
Runs batted in588
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Early years

The Philadelphia Phillies selected Daulton in the 25th round of the 1980 Major League Baseball draft.[2] On September 25, 1983, he made his major league debut for the Phillies. Daulton had three at bats for the Phillies, in 1983.[3] Through 1988, he played sparingly, due chiefly to the presence of all-star catchers Ozzie Virgil Jr. and Lance Parrish. Daulton became the Phillies' full-time catcher in 1989.[4] Throughout his early career, his primary value to the team was as a defensive catcher — his cumulative batting average of .206, through the 1988 season, was barely above the Mendoza Line — and he never appeared in as many as 60 games, in any single season. Daulton‘s breakout season was 1990, his first as his team's primary backstop; that year, he batted .268, with 57 runs batted in (RBI) — which, when coupled with his skills behind the plate, earned him a three-year contract worth $6.75 million.[5] Daulton caught Terry Mulholland's no-hitter, on August 15, 1990.[6]

1991–1993 seasons

Following a slump, in 1991, that saw his batting average fall below .200, Daulton led the National League (NL) in RBIs, for 1992, with 109.[7] He also finished in the top 10 in on-base percentage, slugging percentage, OPS, home runs, walks, runs created, and extra base hits.[8] Daulton earned his first all-star appearance, the NL Silver Slugger Award,[9] and sixth place in NL MVP voting.[10]

Daulton was one of the catalysts of the NL pennant-winning 1993 Phillies. That year, he became the team’s true leader. Although the Phillies lost the World Series, Daulton was again named an all-star, drove in more than 100 runs for the second consecutive season, and finished seventh in NL MVP voting.[11] He once again finished in the league’s top 10 in on-base percentage, RBIs, walks, and extra base hits. Daulton also finished in the top 10 in times on base and intentional walks.[12]

Injury problems

Knee injuries soon caught up with Daulton. In 1994, he was hitting .300, with 15 home runs, and 56 RBIs, through 67 games, when he was injured.[13] In 1995, Daulton was named to his third all-star team;[14] however, he played in only 98 games, and finished the year with just nine home runs.[15] Daulton never caught another big league game, after August 25, 1995.[16]

Daulton missed nearly the entire 1996 season due to injury; he played in only five games, all as an outfielder.[1][17][18] In 1997 — in an attempt to keep Daulton’s still-productive bat in the line-up, despite his chronic injuries — he returned to the outfield, but also played in 42 games as a first baseman.[1][19]

Trade to the Florida Marlins

On July 21, 1997, after 17 years with the Phillies organization, the club traded Daulton to the Florida Marlins for Billy McMillon.[20] By that time, Daulton's knee injuries had escalated even further, limiting his usage to playing first base and pinch hitting. He ended the 1997 campaign with a .263 batting average, 14 home runs, 63 RBI, and 68 runs scored, in 395 at bats. Daulton batted 7-for-18 (.389) in the 1997 World Series, as the Marlins defeated the Cleveland Indians.[21] Daulton announced his retirement, after the series.[4]

Career statistics

In 14 MLB seasons, Daulton hit .245, with 137 home runs, 588 RBIs, and 511 runs scored, in 1,161 games played.[21] Bill James ranked Daulton as the 25th-greatest major league catcher of all-time, in the 2001 edition of his Historical Baseball Abstract.[22]

On August 6, 2010, Daulton was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame.[23]

Post-playing career

Daulton was arrested several times on vehicle-related charges. He was arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) in Pinellas County, Florida, in 1988, and his driver's license was suspended for a year after he refused to take a breathalyzer test. His license was also suspended in the late 1990s due to unpaid speeding tickets; he received at least five during that time period, including one for traveling over 100 miles per hour (160 km/h) in a 65-mile-per-hour (105 km/h) zone. While under his license suspension, he was involved in a single-vehicle accident on January 3, 2001, causing $20,000 worth of damage to his BMW sedan. He again refused to be tested, and was charged with DUI, driving with a suspended license, and failing to appear in court.[24]

Two years later, he was arrested again for driving with a suspended license and DUI, after again refusing to be tested for alcohol.[25] He was also arrested for battery against his wife. He served two and a half months in jail and spent another two and a half months in drug rehabilitation.[26]

Daulton authored a book on occultism and numerology, titled If They Only Knew, published in 2007. In the book he discusses numerous aspects of occultism, referencing experts in the field, and his personal experience with the paranormal.

From 2010 to 2016, during the Philadelphia Phillies season, Daulton hosted the radio show "Talking Baseball with Dutch" from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. on sports radio station WPEN in Philadelphia.[26]

On July 1, 2013, Daulton underwent surgery for resection of two brain tumors related to glioblastoma[27] at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital.[28] On February 23, 2015, Daulton announced that he was cancer-free. The cancer returned in early 2017, and Daulton died from brain cancer on August 6, 2017, aged 55.[29]

Publications

  • Darren Daulton (2007). If They Only Knew. Blue Note Books. ISBN 978-1878398932.
  • William C. Kashatus (2017) Macho Row: The 1993 Phillies and Baseball's Unwritten Code. University of Nebraska Press. ISBN 9780803290860

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Darren Daulton Stats". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. 2019. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  2. ^ "Phillies great Darren Daulton loses 4-year battle with brain cancer". The Star-Ledger. July 1, 2013. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  3. ^ Jayson Stark (October 14, 1993). "From the archives: A win sweet for all, sweetest for Daulton". Philadelphia Daily News. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Snyder, Matt. "Phillies great Darren Daulton dies at age 55 after four-year battle with brain cancer". CBSSports.com. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  5. ^ Livingstone, Seth (November 3, 1990). "Free agents start cashing in". The Telegraph. p. 18. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  6. ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Philadelphia Phillies 6, San Francisco Giants 0". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet. August 15, 1990. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  7. ^ ET. "Darren Daulton, former Philadelphia Phillies catcher, dies at 55". ESPN. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  8. ^ "1992 National League Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  9. ^ "MLB Silver Slugger Award Winners - National League". Baseball-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  10. ^ "1992 Awards Voting". Baseball-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  11. ^ "1993 Awards Voting". Baseball-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  12. ^ "1993 National League Batting Leaders". Baseball-Reference.com. January 1, 1970. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  13. ^ Cwik, Chris. "Former Phillies catcher Darren Daulton dies after battle with cancer". Yahoo!. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  14. ^ "1995 All-Star Game Box Score, July 11". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  15. ^ "1995 Philadelphia Phillies Statistics". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  16. ^ "Philadelphia Phillies 17, Los Angeles Dodgers 4". retrosheet.org. Retrosheet. August 25, 1995. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  17. ^ "Daulton Goes Down, Maybe Out". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. April 8, 1996. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  18. ^ "Daulton's Return on Hold". Los Angeles Times. June 26, 1996. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  19. ^ Walker, Ben (May 11, 1997). "Baseball Notebook". Herald-Journal. Associated Press. p. D4. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  20. ^ "Phillies Send Daulton to Marlins - latimes". Los Angeles Times. July 22, 1997. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  21. ^ a b "Former All-Star catcher from Ark City dies at 55". ctnewsonline.com. July 1, 2013. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  22. ^ Fitzpatrick, Frank. "Former Phillies catcher Darren 'Dutch' Daulton dies at 55". Philly.com. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  23. ^ Mario Aguirre (August 7, 2010). "For Daulton, butterflies as he's enshrined on Wall". Philadelphia Daily News. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  24. ^ "Bosman, DeMerritt help fill out Rays staff". St Petersburg Times. January 5, 2001. Archived from the original on February 21, 2001. Retrieved August 6, 2009.
  25. ^ "Former catcher Daulton arrested on DUI charges". ESPN. July 18, 2003. Retrieved August 6, 2009.
  26. ^ a b "Department: Is Darren Daulton Crazy? - Philadelphia Magazine". Phillymag.com. December 23, 2010. Retrieved August 7, 2017.
  27. ^ "Darren Daulton Passes Along Good News". CBS News. Retrieved January 26, 2016.
  28. ^ "Darren Daulton has surgery to remove brain tumors". nbcsports.com. NBC Sports Philadelphia. July 1, 2013. Retrieved April 27, 2019.
  29. ^ Kelly, Matt (August 6, 2017). "Phillies legend Daulton passes away at 55: Wall of Fame catcher 'Dutch' battled brain cancer for 4 years". Major League Baseball. Retrieved August 6, 2017.

External links

1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1992 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 63rd playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 14, 1992, at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego, the home of the San Diego Padres of the National League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 13–6.

1992 Major League Baseball season

The 1992 Major League Baseball season saw the Toronto Blue Jays defeat the Atlanta Braves in the World Series, becoming the first team outside the United States to win the World Series.

Also a resurgence in pitching dominance occur during this season. On average, one out of every seven games pitched that season was a shutout; in 2,106 MLB regular-season games, 298 shutouts were pitched (up from 272 in 2,104 regular-season games in 1991). Two teams pitched at least 20 shutouts each; the Atlanta Braves led the Majors with 24 and the Pittsburgh Pirates finished second with 20. In the National League, no team hit more than 138 home runs and no team scored 700 runs. The San Francisco Giants were shut out 18 times, the most in the Majors. The effect was similar in the American League. In 1991, two AL teams had scored at least 800 runs and three had collected 1,500 hits. In 1992, no team scored 800 runs and only one reached 1,500 hits. The California Angels were shut out 15 times, the most in the AL.

1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1993 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the 64th playing of the midsummer classic between the all-stars of the American League (AL) and National League (NL), the two leagues comprising Major League Baseball. The game was held on July 13, 1993, at Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore, Maryland, the home of the Baltimore Orioles of the American League. The game resulted in the American League defeating the National League 9-3.

This is also the last Major League Baseball All-Star Game to date to be televised by CBS.

1993 National League Championship Series

The 1993 National League Championship Series was played between the Philadelphia Phillies and Atlanta Braves. The Phillies stunned the 104-win Braves, who were bidding for their third consecutive World Series appearance, and won the NLCS, 4–2.

The Phillies would go on to lose to the Toronto Blue Jays in the World Series in six games.

1993 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1993 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 111th season in the history of the franchise The team won the National League East championship and defeated the Atlanta Braves in the 1993 National League Championship Series in six games, before losing the World Series to the Toronto Blue Jays.

1993 World Series

The 1993 World Series was the 90th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1993 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff series, it pitted the defending champions and American League (AL) champion Toronto Blue Jays against the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies. With Toronto ahead three games to two in the Series, but trailing Game 6 by a score of 6-5 with one out in the bottom of the ninth inning, with runners on first and second base and a count of two balls and two strikes, Joe Carter hit a game-winning three-run home run to win Game 6 by a score of 8-6 and the series four-games-to-two for Toronto, its second consecutive championship (the first team to repeat as champions since the 1977–78 Yankees). This was only the second Series concluded by such a home run (the first was in the 1960 World Series on a Bill Mazeroski home run for the Pittsburgh Pirates), and the first such occasion where a come-from-behind walk-off home run won a World Series. This was the last major North American professional sports championship won by a Canadian team until the Toronto Raptors won the 2019 NBA Finals.

Larry Andersen was the only member of the 1993 Phillies to also play for them in the 1983 World Series, although Darren Daulton was a late season call-up in 1983, but only served as the bullpen catcher in the World Series. Fittingly, in Daulton's first ever MLB game, he was a catcher for Larry Andersen.

1997 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1997 season was the 5th season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1996. Their manager was Jim Leyland. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 92-70, posting the first winning season in franchise history and winning the NL Wild Card. They got through the National League playoffs and won the World Series over the Cleveland Indians.

Arkansas City High School (Kansas)

Arkansas City High School is a public high school in Arkansas City, Kansas, United States, operated by Arkansas City USD 470.

Darren

Darren is a masculine given name of uncertain etymological origins. Some theories state that it originated from an Anglicisation of the Irish first name Darragh or Dáire, meaning "oak tree". According to other theories, it is a variant of Darrell, which originated from the French surname D'Airelle, meaning "of Airelle". The common spelling of Darren is found in the Welsh language, meaning "edge": Black Darren and Red Darren are found on the eastern side of the Hatterrall Ridge, west of Long Town. Darren has several spelling variations including: Daren, Darin, Daryn, Darrin and Darryn.

In the United Kingdom, its popularity peaked during the 1970s but declined sharply afterwards. In England and Wales it first appeared in the early 1960s, ranking 66th in 1964, and had leapt to 15th by 1974, but fell to 33rd by 1984 and last appeared in the top 100 in 1994, when it ranked 100th..

The name was "first brought to public attention" in the English-speaking world in the late 1950s by American actor Darren McGavin. "It was further popularised in the 1960s by the character Darrin Stephens, from the television show Bewitched."

Daulton

Daulton may refer to:

Daulton, California

Darren Daulton (1962–2017), American baseball player

Jack Daulton (born 1956)

Lynne Austin

Lynne Austin (born April 15, 1961 in Plant City, Florida) is an American model and actress. She was chosen as Playboy's Playmate of the Month in July, 1986 and has appeared in numerous Playboy videos. Austin was also selected as the 1987 Playmate of the Year for the Dutch edition of Playboy.

Peninsula Pilots

The Peninsula Pilots are an amateur baseball team in the Coastal Plain League, collegiate summer baseball league. The team plays its home games at the War Memorial Stadium in Hampton, Virginia. The Pilots first started participating in the Coastal Plain League in 2000. The Pilots are coached by Hank Morgan, a former player at Virginia Military Institute and Christopher Newport University.

Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame

The Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame is a collection of plaques, mounted on a brick wall next to the Left Field Gate at Citizens Bank Park, the ballpark of the Philadelphia Phillies. From 1978 to 2003, the Phillies inducted one figure from their franchise history and one notable person from the Philadelphia Athletics (A's) organization each year—with the exception of 1983, when the Phillies inducted their Centennial Team. Once Veterans Stadium closed in 2003, the wall plaques used to recognize the Phillies' members were moved to Citizens Bank Park; however, the Phillies no longer induct notable Athletics. Each person inducted into the Wall of Fame was honored with a metal plaque showing the person's face; their position with, and years of service to the team; and a summary of their most important contributions. In March 2004, the Athletics' plaques were relocated to the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and a single plaque listing all of the A's inductees was attached to a statue of Connie Mack located across the street from Citizens Bank Park.Originally, the goal of the Wall of Fame was to induct the greatest players in Phillies and Athletics history; however, exceptions have been made for non-players who have made significant contributions to the organization. Mack, the Athletics' first inductee, had an 11-year playing career in the National League and the Players' League, but is most remembered for his managerial career, and was honored as such on the Wall. Members have been inducted for contributions in more than one area; Paul Owens, inducted in 1988, spent 48 years as a member of the Phillies organization, contributing as a scout, manager, general manager, and team executive. The Phillies have inducted four first basemen, four second basemen, five third basemen, three shortstops, one utility infielder, three catchers, 21 outfielders, 18 pitchers, seven managers, one general manager, one coach, two team executives, and two sportscasters. Twenty-one members of the Wall of Fame are also members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. All of the inductees in the first four seasons from both teams are members; Del Ennis was the first non-member to be inducted.

The first figures to be inducted into the Wall of Fame were Robin Roberts, who was inducted for the Phillies; and Mack, inducted for the A's. Roberts pitched in Philadelphia for 13 seasons as a member of the National League team, and Mack managed the American League club from 1901 to 1950. Although the Athletics have retired no numbers for players from their Philadelphia years, all seven players for whom the Phillies have retired a number or honored a "P" have been inducted into the Wall of Fame: Roberts (1978), Richie Ashburn (1979), Chuck Klein (1980), Grover Cleveland Alexander (1981), Jim Bunning (1984), Steve Carlton (1989), and Mike Schmidt (1990).On April 10, 2017, it was announced Pete Rose would be that year's inductee into the wall of fame. However, on August 12, 2017, just 10 days before the ceremony, the Phillies announced Rose would not be inducted amid statutory rape allegations. Instead of inducting someone new, they celebrated past inductees.

For the 2018 season Citizens Bank Park was renovated, resulting in the Phillies Wall of Fame being moved from Ashburn Alley. A new Wall of Fame area was created behind the Left Field scoreboard, next to the Left Field gate. This overhauled Left Field Plaza honors the team’s history and incorporates new concession offerings. Featuring large replicas of the team’s World Series trophies from 1980 and 2008, statues of its retired numbers along with the relocated Wall of Fame it is an area for fans to learn about and honor the team's past.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 202 players have had surnames beginning with the letter M, which is the largest total of any single letter, followed by S with 187 players. The highest numbers of individual batters belongs to M (115), and S has the most pitchers (90). The letters with the smallest representation are Q (5 players), U (6 players), Z (7 players), and Y (8 players); however, there has never been a Phillies player, nor a player in Major League Baseball history, whose surname begins with the letter X.Thirty-two players in Phillies history have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Those players for whom the Hall recognizes the Phillies as their primary team include Grover Cleveland Alexander, Richie Ashburn, Dave Bancroft, Steve Carlton, Ed Delahanty, Billy Hamilton, Chuck Klein, Robin Roberts, Mike Schmidt, and Sam Thompson; manager Harry Wright was also inducted for his contributions with the club. The Phillies have retired numbers for six players, including Schmidt (#20), Carlton (#32), Ashburn (#1), Roberts (#36), and Jim Bunning (#14); the sixth retired number is Jackie Robinson's #42, which was retired throughout baseball in 1997. The Phillies also honor two additional players with the letter "P" in the manner of a retired number: Alexander played before numbers were used in the major leagues; and Klein wore a variety of numbers in his Phillies career.Thirty-six Phillies players have been elected to the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame. All of the players listed above (save Robinson) have been elected; also included are Dick Allen, Bob Boone, Larry Bowa, Johnny Callison, Gavvy Cravath, Darren Daulton, Del Ennis, Jimmie Foxx, Dallas Green, Granny Hamner, Willie Jones, John Kruk, Mike Lieberthal, Greg Luzinski, Garry Maddox, Sherry Magee, Tug McGraw, Juan Samuel, Curt Schilling, Bobby Shantz, Chris Short, Curt Simmons, Tony Taylor, John Vukovich, and Cy Williams. Foxx and Shantz were inducted for their contributions as members of the Philadelphia Athletics. Two non-players are also members of the Wall of Fame for their contributions to the Phillies: broadcaster Harry Kalas; and manager, general manager, and team executive Paul Owens.

Philadelphia Phillies all-time roster (D)

The Philadelphia Phillies are a Major League Baseball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are a member of the Eastern Division of Major League Baseball's National League. The team has played officially under two names since beginning play in 1883: the current moniker, as well as the "Quakers", which was used in conjunction with "Phillies" during the team's early history. The team was also known unofficially as the "Blue Jays" during the World War II era. Since the franchise's inception, 2,006 players have made an appearance in a competitive game for the team, whether as an offensive player (batting and baserunning) or a defensive player (fielding, pitching, or both).

Of those 2,006 Phillies, 99 have had surnames beginning with the letter D. Two of those players have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame: outfielder Ed Delahanty, who played two stints for Philadelphia—from 1888 to 1889, and again from 1891 to 1901; and outfielder Hugh Duffy, who was a Phillie for three seasons (1904–1906) after being out of the major leagues for two years. The Hall of Fame lists the Phillies as Delahanty's primary team, and he is a member of the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame, as is catcher Darren Daulton. Delahanty holds two franchise records, amassing 442 doubles and 157 triples to lead all Phillies in those categories. Pitcher Bill Duggleby also holds a record; he hit 81 batters in his eight-year career in Philadelphia.Among the 60 batters in this list, outfielder Vern Duncan's .417 batting average is the highest mark; he amassed five hits in twelve plate appearances with Philadelphia. Other players with an average above .300 include Dick Davis (.311 in two seasons), Kiddo Davis (.302 in two seasons), Spud Davis (.321 in eight seasons), Delahanty (.348 in eleven seasons), Alexander Donoghue (.318 in one season), and George Durning (.357 in one season). Daulton's 134 home runs and Delahanty's 1,288 runs batted in lead all players whose surnames begin with D.Of this list's 40 pitchers, Valerio de los Santos and Robert Dodd share the best win–loss record by winning percentage; each won one game while losing none. Duggleby's 90 wins and 99 losses are most among the members of this list, as are his 445 strikeouts. Dave Downs' 2.74 earned run average (ERA) in the only season of his career is the best mark in that category. Red Donahue is one of the ten Phillies pitchers who have thrown a no-hitter, accomplishing the feat on July 8, 1898.One player, Ed Daily, has made 30% or more of his Phillies appearances as a pitcher and a position player. He amassed a 42–36 pitching record with a 2.77 ERA while batting .230 with six home runs as an outfielder.

Pros vs. Joes

Pros vs. Joes was an American physical reality game show that aired on Spike from 2006 to 2010. The show featured male amateur contestants (the "Joes") matching themselves against professional athletes (the "Pros"; mostly of retired male and female pro-athletes) in a series of athletic feats related to the expertise sport of the Pro they are facing. For its first three seasons, the show was hosted by Petros Papadakis. In the last two seasons, it was co-hosted by Michael Strahan and Jay Glazer. The first two seasons were filmed at Carson, California's Home Depot Center, which was referenced in aerial shots. Repeats can currently be seen on the El Rey Network.

Tyler Green (baseball)

Tyler Scott Green (born February 18, 1970), is an American former professional baseball pitcher, who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies, from 1993-1998.

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