Dapper Dan Charities

The Dapper Dan Charities were founded by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette editor Al Abrams in 1936. It is one of the oldest non-profit and fundraising community sports club in the world, and the oldest in Western Pennsylvania. The foundations fundraises for its charities primarily through the annual "Dapper Dan Banquet". Started in 1936 the first few banquets honored such regional figures as Art Rooney, Jock Sutherland and John Harris. In 1939 the banquet began an annual tradition of naming the region's "Sportsman of the Year" and in 1999 the "Sportswoman of the Year". In recent decades all charitable contributions raised by the banquet go to the Boys and Girls club of Western Pennsylvania, which directly funds activities and equipment for nearly 7,000 youths annually. The organization also presently sponsors the annual Dapper Dan Wrestling Classic.[1]

Previous fundraisers included the occasional Dapper Dan Open golf tournament in the 1930s and 1940s, World Heavyweight Titles hosted at Forbes Field in the 1950s and 1960s and the Roundball Classic hosted at the Civic Arena from 1965 until the 1980s.

Through Pittsburgh Pirates broadcaster Bob Prince's friendship with Fred Hutchinson the Dapper Dan Charity awarded Major League Baseball's annual Hutch Award at the annual banquet until at least 1993.[2][3][4][5]

Dapper Dan awards

Year Sportsman Sport
or Team
Sportswoman Sport
or Team
Lifetime Achievement Sport
or Team
Venue
1939 Billy Conn boxing William Penn Hotel [6]
1940 Fritzie Zivic boxing William Penn [7]
1941 Aldo Donelli Steelers William Penn [7]
1942 Bill Dudley Steelers William Penn [7]
1943 Rip Sewell Pirates William Penn [7]
1944 Frankie Frisch Pirates William Penn [7]
1945 Billy Conn boxing William Penn [7]
1946 Bill Dudley Steelers William Penn [7]
1947 Ralph Kiner Pirates William Penn [7]
1948 Bill Meyer Pirates William Penn [7]
1949 Ralph Kiner Pirates William Penn [7]
1950 Joe Geri Steelers William Penn [7]
1951 Murry Dickson Pirates William Penn [7]
1952 Red Dawson Panthers William Penn [7]
1952 Stan Musial Cardinals William Penn [7]
1953 Lew Worsham golf William Penn [7]
1954 Dudley Moore Dukes William Penn [7]
1955 John Michelosen Steelers William Penn [7]
1956 Dale Long Pirates Penn-Sheraton [7][8]
1957 Dick Groat Pirates Penn-Sheraton [7]
1958 Danny Murtaugh Pirates Penn-Sheraton [7]
1959 Elroy Face Pirates Hilton [7]
1960 Arnold Palmer golf Hilton [7]
1960 Dick Groat Pirates Hilton [7][9]
1961 Roberto Clemente Pirates Hilton [7]
1962 Lou Michaels Steelers Hilton [7]
1963 John Michelosen Steelers
1964 Delvin Miller horse racing
1965 Vernon Law Pirates Hilton [10]
1966 Roberto Clemente Pirates
1967 Baz Bastien Penguins
1968 Steve Blass Pirates
1968 Dick Hoak Steelers
1969 Red Manning Dukes
1970 Danny Murtaugh Pirates
1971 Willie Stargell Pirates
1971 Danny Murtaugh Pirates
1971 Roberto Clemente Pirates
1972 Chuck Noll Steelers
1973 Johnny Majors Panthers
1974 Joe Greene[11] Steelers Hilton
1975 Terry Bradshaw Steelers
1976 Tony Dorsett Panthers
1977 Franco Harris Steelers
1978 Dave Parker Pirates Hilton[12]
1979 Willie Stargell Pirates Stan Musial Cardinals Hilton
1980 Hugh Green Panthers
1981 Jackie Sherrill Panthers Art Rooney Steelers Hilton [13]
1982 Joe Paterno[14] Lions Joe Schmidt[15] Pitt Hilton[16][17]
1983 Dan Marino Panthers Franco Harris Steelers Hilton[18]
1984 John Stallworth Steelers Hilton
1985 Louis Lipps Steelers Bill Dudley [19] Steelers Hilton
1986 Mario Lemieux Penguins Hilton
1987 Syd Thrift Pirates
1988 Mario Lemieux Penguins Hilton
1989 Roger Kingdom Panthers (track) Hilton
1990 Jim Leyland Pirates Hilton
1991 Bob Johnson Penguins Hilton[20]
1992 Bill Cowher Steelers Hilton [2]
1993 Jay Bell Pirates
1994 Bill Cowher Steelers
1995 Jaromir Jagr Penguins
1996 Kurt Angle wrestling Hilton[21]
1997 Jerome Bettis Steelers Hilton[22]
1998 Joe Paterno Lions Hilton[23]
1999 Mario Lemieux Penguins Suzie McConnell-Serio Rockers/Oakland Catholic Dan Marino[24] Pitt Hilton
2000 Jason Kendall Pirates Dori Anderson Blackhawk High Mike Ditka[25][26] Aliquippa Hilton
2001 Kordell Stewart Steelers Carol Semple Thompson[27] golf Chuck Noll[28] Steelers Hilton[29]
2002 Ben Howland Panthers Swin Cash UConn Huskies Lanny Frattare Pirates Hilton[30]
2003 Larry Fitzgerald Panthers Kelly Mazzante Lady Lions The 1979 Champion Teams Pirates
Steelers
Hilton[31]
2004 Ben Roethlisberger Steelers Lauryn Williams olympics Arnold Palmer Golf Convention Center[32]
2005 Jerome Bettis Steelers Agnus Berenato Panthers Joe Paterno Penn State Hilton[33][34]
2006 Sidney Crosby Penguins Swin Cash Detroit Shock Dan Rooney[35] Steelers Convention Center
2007 Sidney Crosby Penguins Agnus Benerato Panthers (None bestowed) Convention Center[36]
2008[37] Mike Tomlin Steelers Shavonte Zellous Panthers Dick LeBeau Football Petersen Events Center
2009 Evgeni Malkin Penguins Penn State Volleyball Lions Bruno Sammartino wrestling Petersen Events Center [38]
2010 Jamie Dixon Panthers [39] Suzie McConnell-Serio Dukes Joe Greene Steelers Convention Center [40]
2011 Dan Bylsma, Marc-André Fleury[41] Penguins Pittsburgh Passion[41] Women's football Mike Ditka[42] Panthers Convention Center
2012 Andrew McCutchen[43] Pirates Taylor Schram[43] PSU Women's soccer Hines Ward[43] Steelers Convention Center
2013 Clint Hurdle[44] Pirates Patrice Matamoros[45] Pittsburgh Marathon Franco Harris[46] Steelers Convention Center
2014 Antonio Brown Steelers Christa Harmotto Penn State (Volleyball) Jim Kelly Football [1] Convention Center
2015 Antonio Brown[47] Steelers Meghan Klingenberg[47] United States women's national soccer team Dick Groat[47] Pitt basketball (broadcasting) Convention Center
2016 Mike Sullivan and Jim Rutherford Penguins Amanda Polk Oakland Catholic/Olympics Rocky Bleier Steelers [2] Convention Center

Banquet festivities

Various years the Dapper Dan Banquet has been a who's who of Western Pennsylvania sports, and attracted national and even international stars and entertainers. In 1993 George Wendt and David Lander hosted the event.[2] Howard Baldwin, Craig Patrick, Lanny Frattare, Marty Schottenheimer, Rod Woodson, Ambassador Dan Rooney, Art Rooney, Mark May, John Brown, Sal Sunseri, Hank Aaron,[48] Myron Cope, Lou Holtz,[49] Terry Francona, Pat Mullins, Dave Robinson, Len Dawson, Lou Groza, Bud Wilkinson,[50] Bob Prince, Governor Lawrence and Todd Blackledge[13] have all participated in recent events.

References

  1. ^ "Dapper Dan Wrestling Classic". Wrestlingclassic.com. Archived from the original on 2014-03-22. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  2. ^ a b c "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  3. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  4. ^ "The Southeast Missourian - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Schenectady Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  6. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y "Dapper Dan Dinner Set at Hilton Feb .3: Big Sports Party to Hit Town for 27th Anniversary". The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. December 12, 1962. Retrieved 2015-06-23. "The coming Dapper Dan Dinner will mark the fourth year in succession that it has been held in the huge Hilton Ball Room. The previous 23 fetes were staged at the old William Penn Hotel, later the Penn-Sheraton."
  8. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
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  11. ^ "Mean Joe Star of Dapper Dan Weekend". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. February 8, 1975. p. 10. Retrieved November 8, 2016.
  12. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
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  26. ^ "Paterno To Be Inducted Into Pittsburgh Hall of Fame on Saturday". gopsusports.com. Archived from the original on 7 November 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  27. ^ "Sportswoman of the year: Thompson's investment in golf pays big dividends for her, game". old.post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  28. ^ "Chuck Noll: Always more than just a coach". old.post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 18 June 2015. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  29. ^ "Dapper Dan: Pittsburgh sports luminaries feted at banquet". old.post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  30. ^ "Dapper Dan Dinner: Bradshaw-Noll reconciliation inspires crowd". old.post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  31. ^ "Magic of No. 1 takes the spotlight at Dapper Dan dinner". post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  32. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  33. ^ "Honorees Paterno, Berenato, Bettis share Dapper Dan spotlight". post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  34. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  35. ^ "Rooney, Cash, Crosby honored at Dapper Dan Dinner". post-gazette.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  36. ^ Finder, Chuck (2008-04-02). "Dapper Dan: Crosby, Berenato humble winners - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 2008-10-13. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  37. ^ Dvorchak, Robert (2009-02-15). "2009 Dapper Dan Awards: Mike Tomlin & Shavonte Zellous". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on 2009-02-25. Retrieved 2012-03-08.
  38. ^ Dvorchak, Robert (2010-03-26). "Dapper Dan: Malkin, Sammartino, Penn State volleyball claim awards - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  39. ^ Fittipaldo, Ray (2010-12-26). "Dapper Dan Sportsman and Sportswoman of the Year: Jamie Dixon and Suzie McConnell-Serio - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 2010-12-30. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  40. ^ Sanserino, Michael (2010-12-05). "Dapper Dan Dinner: Ganassi chosen for new award 2011 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  41. ^ a b Anderson, Shelly (2012-01-22). "Dapper Dan 76th Honorees: Bylsma, Fleury, Passion headline 2012 dais". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on 2012-01-27. Retrieved 2012-03-08.
  42. ^ Sanserino, Michael (2012-01-01). "Dapper Dan Honors - Ditka, doctor to receive awards". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Retrieved 2012-03-08.
  43. ^ a b c "McCutchen honored as Dapper Dan Sportsman of the Year". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. December 30, 2012. Archived from the original on February 6, 2013.
  44. ^ Brink, Bill (2013-12-21). "Pirates manager Hurdle humbled by pick for Dapper Dan - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 2014-01-08. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  45. ^ Werner, Sam (2013-12-21). "Dapper Dan Sportswoman gave marathon new life as director - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 2014-02-25. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  46. ^ Fittipaldo, Ray (2014-02-01). "Dapper Dan: Franco Harris a player for all times - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette". Post-gazette.com. Archived from the original on 2014-02-19. Retrieved 2014-02-20.
  47. ^ a b c Menendez, Jenn (2016-02-18). "Dapper Dan awardee Dick Groat savors another moment in spotlight". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on 2017-02-18. Retrieved 2017-02-17.
  48. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  49. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.
  50. ^ "Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com. Retrieved 3 May 2018.

External links

City Game

The City Game is an annual college basketball game between the University of Pittsburgh Panthers and the Duquesne University Dukes. The term "City Game" is also used refer to women's basketball games played annually between the two universities and may also be used to refer to other athletic competitions between the two schools.

Dapper Dan Open

The Dapper Dan Open was a professional golf tournament on the PGA Tour that was played intermittently in the 1930s and 1940s. It was sponsored by Dapper Dan Charities, a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania-based charitable organization founded in 1936 as a businessman's sports club by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette sports editor Al Abrams. Dapper Dan evolved into one of western Pennsylvania's premier sports charities with six fund raising events throughout the year, including Pittsburgh's oldest, largest and most-prestigious annual sports banquet. The organization awarded its top honor to golfer Arnold Palmer in 1960.Arnold Palmer's first ever PGA tournament was the Dapper Dan when he was just 16 years old.The tournament was played at the Wildwood Country Club in Allison Park, Pennsylvania in 1939. After a break of nine years, the tournament resumed in 1948 at the Alcoma Country Club in Pittsburgh.

Fifth Avenue High School

Fifth Avenue High School is a defunct school located at 1800 Fifth Avenue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania's Bluff neighborhood, United States.

Built in 1894 as a large Romanesque/Gothic Revival building, it served the Pittsburgh Public Schools until its closure in 1976. For over thirty years, the building sat empty, boarded up, and fenced off until it was eventually converted into other uses.

Fifth Avenue was the first fireproof school in Pennsylvania and was home to the Alpha Chapter of the National Honor Society. Its colors were red and white, and the mascot was the Archer, so chosen because of the school's architecture and hallways filled with Gothic and Victorian arches lined with red and white tile.

Fifth Avenue was a dominant force in city sports, winning the state title in its last year open for basketball. The school served the Lower Hill District, while its main rival, Schenley High School, served the upper and middle Hill.

The building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1986 and was listed as a Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation landmark in 1998 and a City of Pittsburgh landmark in 1999.Beginning in 2009, it was converted into loft apartments by a Pittsburgh-based investor group. Construction on the project was completed in 2012. Numerous components of the structure, such as plaster ceilings in common areas, were saved, preserved, or reused in the renovations.Among the school's notable alumni are former Mayor of Pittsburgh Sophie Masloff, Dapper Dan Charities founder and former Pittsburgh Post-Gazette sports editor Al Abrams, and forensic pathologist Cyril Wecht, who served as Coroner (later Medical Examiner) and a Commissioner of Allegheny County.

Freddie Fu

Freddie H. Fu (傅浩強; pinyin: Fù Hàoqiáng) is a Hong Kong-American doctor and academic. He is the David Silver Professor and chairman of the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. In 2010, he was appointed by the University of Pittsburgh as the eighth distinguished service professor.

Hutch Award

The Hutch Award is given annually to an active Major League Baseball (MLB) player who "best exemplifies the fighting spirit and competitive desire" of Fred Hutchinson, by persevering through adversity. The award was created in 1965 in honor of Hutchinson, the former MLB pitcher and manager, who died of lung cancer the previous year. The Hutch Award was created by Hutch's longtime friends Bob Prince, a broadcaster for the Pittsburgh Pirates and KDKA; Jim Enright, a Chicago sportswriter; and Ritter Collett, the sports editor of the Dayton Journal Herald. They also created a scholarship fund for medical students engaged in cancer research to honor Hutchinson's memory.Eleven members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame have won the Hutch Award. The inaugural winner was Mickey Mantle. Danny Thompson, the 1974 recipient, was diagnosed with leukemia earlier that year. He continued to play through the 1976 season before dying that December at the age of 29. Jon Lester won the award in 2008 after recovering from anaplastic large-cell lymphoma.The award is presented annually at the Hutch Award Luncheon hosted by the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, at Safeco Field. The award was originally presented at the annual Dapper Dan Banquet in Pittsburgh. Each winner receives a copy of the original trophy, designed by Dale Chihuly. The permanent display of the Hutch Award is at the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, where it has been since 1979.

Lew Worsham

Lewis Elmer Worsham, Jr. (October 5, 1917 – October 19, 1990) was an American professional golfer, the U.S. Open champion in 1947.

Born in Pittsylvania County, Virginia, Worsham won the U.S. Open in 1947 by defeating Sam Snead by a stroke in an 18-hole playoff at the St. Louis Country Club in Clayton, Missouri. This was the first U.S. Open to be televised locally and the winner's share was $2,000. In July 1947, Worsham appeared on the cover of Golfing magazine. In 1953, he led the PGA Tour money list with $34,002 in earnings. That same year he won the first golf tournament to be broadcast nationally in the United States and golf's first $100,000 tournament, the Tam O'Shanter World Championship of Golf, in spectacular fashion. He holed out a wedge from 104 yards for an eagle-2 to win over Chandler Harper by one shot.

Worsham made his only Ryder Cup appearance in 1947 and won both of his matches. Like most tour players of his generation, he earned his living primarily as a club professional, and was the longtime pro at Oakmont Country Club, northeast of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He died at age 73 in Poquoson, Virginia.Worsham was honored as the "Sportsperson of the Year" for 1953 by Pittsburgh's Dapper Dan Charities. He was inducted into the PGA of America Hall of Fame in 2017.

Pittsburgh Passion

The Pittsburgh Passion is a women's American football team based in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. The franchise was formed in March 2002 and is currently owned by Teresa Conn, Anthony Misitano, and Franco Harris. The team is a part of the Women's Football Alliance, with home games played at West Allegheny High School in Imperial, Pennsylvania.

Pittsburgh Steelers

The Pittsburgh Steelers are a professional American football team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Steelers compete in the National Football League (NFL), as a member club of the league's American Football Conference (AFC) North division. Founded in 1933, the Steelers are the oldest franchise in the AFC.

In contrast with their status as perennial also-rans in the pre-merger NFL, where they were the oldest team never to win a league championship, the Steelers of the post-merger (modern) era are one of the most successful NFL franchises. Pittsburgh is tied with the New England Patriots for the most Super Bowl titles (6), and has both played in (16) and hosted more conference championship games (11) than any other NFL team. The Steelers have won 8 AFC championships, tied with the Denver Broncos, but behind the Patriots' record 11 AFC championships. The Steelers share the record for second most Super Bowl appearances with the Broncos, and Dallas Cowboys (8). The Steelers lost their most recent championship appearance, Super Bowl XLV, on February 6, 2011.

The Steelers, whose history traces to a regional pro team that was established in the early 1920s, joined the NFL as the Pittsburgh Pirates on July 8, 1933, owned by Art Rooney and taking its original name from the baseball team of the same name, as was common practice for NFL teams at the time. To distinguish them from the baseball team, local media took to calling the football team the Rooneymen, an unofficial nickname which persisted for decades after the team adopted its current nickname. The ownership of the Steelers has remained within the Rooney family since its founding. Art's son, Dan Rooney owned the team from 1988 until his death in 2017. Much control of the franchise has been given to Dan's son Art Rooney II. The Steelers enjoy a large, widespread fanbase nicknamed Steeler Nation. The Steelers currently play their home games at Heinz Field on Pittsburgh's North Side in the North Shore neighborhood, which also hosts the University of Pittsburgh Panthers. Built in 2001, the stadium replaced Three Rivers Stadium which hosted the Steelers for 31 seasons. Prior to Three Rivers, the Steelers had played their games in Pitt Stadium and Forbes Field.

Roundball Classic

The Roundball Classic, originally known as The Dapper Dan Roundball Classic (also known as Magic Johnson's Roundball, Sonny Vaccaro's Roundball Classic, Asics Roundball Classic) is well known in the sports world as the first national high school All Star basketball game. It was sponsored by and used as a fundraising event for the Dapper Dan Charities in Pittsburgh. The inaugural game was played at the Civic Arena in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on March 26, 1965.

Sports in Pittsburgh

Sports in Pittsburgh have been played dating back to the American Civil War. Baseball, hockey, and the first professional American football game had been played in the city by 1892. Pittsburgh was first known as the "City of Champions" when the Pittsburgh Pirates, Pittsburgh Panthers, and Pittsburgh Steelers won multiple championships in the 1970s. Today, the city has three major professional sports franchises, the Pirates, Steelers, and Penguins; while the University of Pittsburgh Panthers compete in a Division I BCS conference, the highest level of collegiate athletics in the United States, in both football and basketball. Local universities Duquesne and Robert Morris also field Division I teams in men's and women's basketball and Division I FCS teams in football. Robert Morris also fields Division I men's and women's ice hockey teams.

Pittsburgh is once again being called the "City of Champions" as its Steelers and Penguins are recent champions of the NFL and NHL, respectively, in 2009. These accomplishments and others helped Pittsburgh earn the title of "Best Sports City" in 2009 from the Sporting News.

Including the 2008–09 seasons, the Steelers have reached the NFL playoffs in six of the last eight seasons—winning two Super Bowl titles—and the Penguins have reached the NHL playoffs the last four years with back-to-back finals appearances, an Atlantic Division Crown, and a Stanley Cup championship, none of which won at home (the last championship won in Pittsburgh was in 1960 by the Pirates).

The flag of Pittsburgh is colored with black and gold, based on the colors of William Pitt's coat of arms; Pittsburgh is the only city in the United States in which all professional sporting teams share the same colors. The city's first National Hockey League (NHL) franchise, the Pittsburgh Pirates were the first to wear black and gold as their colors. The colors were adopted by founder of the Pittsburgh Steelers, Art Rooney, in 1933. In 1948, the Pittsburgh baseball Pirates switched their colors from red and blue to black and gold. Pittsburgh's second NHL franchise, the Pittsburgh Penguins, wore blue and white, due to then-general manager Jack Riley's upbringing in Ontario. In 1979, after the Steelers and Pirates had each won their respective league championships, the Penguins altered their color scheme to match, despite objections from the Boston Bruins, who has used the black and gold combination since the 1934-35 NHL season.

In 1975, late Steelers radio broadcaster Myron Cope invented the Terrible Towel, which has become "arguably the best-known fan symbol of any major pro sports team." Cope was one of multiple sports figures born in Pittsburgh and its surrounding area; others include golfer Arnold Palmer, Olympian Kurt Angle, and basketball player Jack Twyman. Pittsburgh is also sometimes called the "Cradle of Quarterbacks" due to the number of prominent players of that position who hail from the area, including NFL greats Jim Kelly, George Blanda, Johnny Unitas, Joe Namath, Dan Marino, and Joe Montana.

Timeline of Pittsburgh

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US.

Baseball
Basketball
Football
Hockey
Soccer
Other
Venues
Historical

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