Danny Jackson

Danny Lynn Jackson (born January 5, 1962) is an American former professional baseball pitcher who played fifteen seasons in Major League Baseball from 1983 to 1997. He played for the Kansas City Royals, Cincinnati Reds, Chicago Cubs, Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, St. Louis Cardinals, and San Diego Padres.

A key member of the World Series winning Royals in 1985, Jackson made one of the most important starts in Royals history in the ALCS. Trailing the Blue Jays three games to one and facing elimination, Jackson tossed a complete game shutout and kept the Royals alive. Two weeks later, in the World Series, Jackson again took the ball with the Royals trailing three games to one in a Game Five, and again Jackson led the Royals to a crucial victory over the St. Louis Cardinals. In the seventh inning of that game, he pitched, as of 2018, the only immaculate inning in World Series play; his victims were Terry Pendleton, Tom Nieto and Brian Harper. Jackson's 1.04 post-season ERA with the Royals is the lowest in team history (min 10 IP). After disappointing seasons in 1986 and 1987, Jackson was traded to the Cincinnati Reds.

He was selected to the National League NL All-Star team in 1988 and 1994. He tied for the National League lead in wins in 1988 with 23 and, with 18-game winner Tom Browning, combined for the best pitching tandem in baseball that season. Jackson's great 1988 season went largely unnoticed because of the outstanding season turned in by the Dodgers Orel Hershiser.

In total, Jackson played in three World Series for three different franchises: the 1985 Kansas City Royals, the 1990 Cincinnati Reds, and the 1993 Philadelphia Phillies.

Danny Jackson
Pitching DannyJackson1990
Pitcher
Born: January 5, 1962 (age 57)
San Antonio, Texas
Batted: Right Threw: Left
MLB debut
September 11, 1983, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
August 7, 1997, for the San Diego Padres
MLB statistics
Win–loss record112–131
Earned run average4.01
Strikeouts1,225
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

External links

1984 Kansas City Royals season

The 1984 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 1st in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 78 losses. However, they would lose to the Detroit Tigers in 3 Games in the ALCS. The Tigers would go on to the World Series and defeat the San Diego Padres in 5 Games.

1985 American League Championship Series

The 1985 American League Championship Series was played between the Kansas City Royals and the Toronto Blue Jays from October 8 to 16. Major League Baseball decided to extend the Championship Series in both leagues from its best-of-five (1969–1984) to the current best-of-seven format starting with this year, and it proved pivotal in the outcome of the ALCS. The Blue Jays seemingly put a stranglehold on the Series, earning a three games to one lead over the Royals after four games. However, Kansas City staged an improbable comeback, winning the next three games to win the American League Championship Series four games to three. The Royals would proceed to defeat their cross-state rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals, in the World Series four games to three.

The oddsmakers favored Toronto, 8–5. During the opening pregame show, NBC Sports baseball analyst Tony Kubek was among the few who predicted a Kansas City victory, citing the Blue Jays' struggles against left-handed pitching, and the Royals' plethora of left-handed starters. This prediction was especially curious considering Kubek worked on Blue Jays television broadcasts during the regular season.

1985 Kansas City Royals season

The 1985 Kansas City Royals season ended with the Royals' first world championship win over their intrastate rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals. The Royals won the Western Division of the American League for the second consecutive season and the sixth time in ten years. The team improved its record to 91–71 on the strength of its pitching, led by Bret Saberhagen's Cy Young Award-winning performance.

In the playoffs, the Royals went on to win the American League Championship Series for just the second time and the World Series for the first time (they previously lost the 1980 World Series). Both the ALCS and the World Series were won in seven games after the Royals lost the first two games at home and three of the first four games overall. The championship series against the Cardinals was forever remembered in St. Louis by umpires' supposedly blown calls in Game Six: one that cost the Royals a run in the 4th, and a blown call by umpire Don Denkinger that allowed Jorge Orta to reach first. The World Series is remembered in Kansas City as the culmination of ten years of dominance by the Royals, during which they reached the playoffs seven times, with stars such as George Brett, Hal McRae and Willie Wilson.

The team was managed by Dick Howser in his fourth and final full season with the Royals.

The Royals did not return to the postseason until 2014 and won the World Series again in 2015.

1985 World Series

The 1985 World Series began on October 19 and ended on October 27. The American League champions Kansas City Royals played the National League champions St. Louis Cardinals, with the Royals upsetting the heavily favored Cardinals in seven games. The Series was popularly known as the "Show-Me Series" or the "I-70 Showdown Series," as both cities are in the state of Missouri and are connected by Interstate 70.

The Cardinals won the National League East division by three games over the New York Mets, then defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers four games to two in the National League Championship Series. The Royals won the American League West division by one game over the California Angels, then defeated the Toronto Blue Jays four games to three in the American League Championship Series.

The Cardinals were seeking to win their NL-leading 10th World Series title, while the Royals were seeking their first World Series title. The Royals were completing one of the most successful decades by any expansion team, with six division titles and two pennants from 1976 to 1985. This was the first World Series in which all games were played at night. Also, this was the first World Series to feature television commentator Tim McCarver, who called the games for ABC with Al Michaels and Jim Palmer. (Howard Cosell was originally scheduled to be in the booth with Michaels and Palmer, but was removed from his assignment just prior to Game 1 because of the controversy surrounding his book I Never Played the Game.) McCarver would go on to call a record 24 World Series telecasts for various networks.

This was the second Missouri-only World Series, with the first being the 1944 World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Browns (the Browns later moving and becoming the Baltimore Orioles). The 1985 World Series marked the 5th time in World Series history that a team came back from a three games to one deficit to win a championship. Bret Saberhagen's victories in Games 3 and 7, with him allowing only a single run on both starts, earned him the World Series Most Valuable Player award.

This was the last World Series in which the designated hitter was not used in an American League baseball park. From 1976 to 1985, in even-numbered years, the DH would be used in all games. In odd-numbered years, like this World Series, the pitchers from both were required to bat for themselves throughout the series. Beginning with the next World Series, the DH rule would be used only in games played at the American League representative's park. The Royals became World Series champions for the first time in their history; they would return to the Series in 2014, in which they played the 2014 World Series against the San Francisco Giants but lost in seven games. A year later in the 2015 World Series, the Royals would win their 2nd title against the New York Mets.

AL Kansas City Royals (4) vs. NL St. Louis Cardinals (3)

1986 Kansas City Royals season

The 1986 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses.

1987 Kansas City Royals season

The 1987 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 2nd in the American League West with a record of 83 wins and 79 losses.

1988 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1988 season was a season in American baseball. It consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West. Led by manager Pete Rose, the Reds had a record of 87 wins and 74 losses, finishing seven games back of the eventual World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers. The 1988 season would be Pete Rose's last full season as Reds manager.

1988 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1988 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished sixth in the National League East with a record of 65 wins and 96 losses.

1989 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1989 season consisted of the Cincinnati Reds attempting to win the National League West for the first time since 1979. The season was defined by allegations of gambling by Pete Rose. Before the end of the season, Rose was banned from baseball by commissioner A. Bartlett Giamatti.

1990 Cincinnati Reds season

The Cincinnati Reds' 1990 season was the Reds' 108th season in American baseball. Starting with a club best nine straight wins to open the season, as well as holding the top spot in the National League West every game during the season, the Reds went 41-21 after 62 games, splitting the remaining 100 games 50-50 to end up with a 91-71 record. It consisted of the 91-71 Reds winning the National League West by five games over the second-place Dodgers, as well as the National League Championship Series in six games over the Pittsburgh Pirates, and the World Series in a four-game sweep over the overwhelming favorite Oakland Athletics, who had won the World Series the previous year. It was the fifth World Championship for the Reds, and their first since winning two consecutive titles in 1975 and '76.

1992 Major League Baseball expansion draft

On November 17, 1992, during the 1992–93 offseason, Major League Baseball (MLB) held an expansion draft in New York City to allow two expansion teams, the Florida Marlins and Colorado Rockies, to build their rosters prior to debuting in the National League's (NL) East and the West divisions, respectively, in the 1993 MLB season.

The 1990 collective bargaining agreement between MLB owners and the MLB Players Association allowed the NL to expand by two members to match the American League (AL). In June 1991, MLB accepted bids of groups from Miami, Florida, and Denver, Colorado, with debuts set for 1993.The Marlins and Rockies used the expansion draft to build their teams using different strategies. As the Rockies had a smaller operating budget than the Marlins, the Rockies targeted prospects with low salaries, while the Marlins selected older players intended to provide more immediate impact. All three rounds of the draft were televised by ESPN.

1993 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1993 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 111th season in the history of the franchise The team won the National League East championship and defeated the Atlanta Braves in the 1993 National League Championship Series in six games, before losing the World Series to the Toronto Blue Jays.

1994 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1994 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 112th season in the history of the franchise.

1997 St. Louis Cardinals season

The St. Louis Cardinals 1997 season was the team's 116th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 106th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 73-89 during the season and finished 4th in the National League Central division, eleven games behind the Houston Astros.

Danny Jackson (footballer)

Danny Jackson (born 20 October 1979) is an English central defender/sweeper who last played for the Seattle Sounders, and served as captain from 2004–2008.

List of Major League Baseball pitchers who have thrown an immaculate inning

In baseball, a strikeout occurs when a pitcher throws three strikes to a batter during his time at bat. Eighty-seven different pitchers have struck out three batters on nine consecutive pitches in a half-inning of a Major League Baseball (MLB) game as of 2018, the most recent being Zac Rosscup of the Los Angeles Dodgers on August 19, 2018. Five players have accomplished the feat—commonly known as an immaculate inning—more than once in their career; no player has ever struck out four batters on twelve pitches in an inning. John Clarkson was the first player to strike out three batters on nine pitches, doing so in the third inning for the Boston Beaneaters against the Philadelphia Quakers on June 4, 1889.Out of the 87 pitchers who have accomplished the feat, 68 were right-handed and 19 pitched left-handed. Seven of these players (including four active pitchers) have played for only one major league team. Four pitchers—Bob Gibson, Randy Johnson, Pedro Martínez and Nolan Ryan—are also members of the 3,000 strikeout club. Sloppy Thurston, Ryan, and Wade Miley are the only rookies to have attained the milestone. Ryan struck out three batters on nine pitches in the American League and National League, becoming the only player to achieve the feat in both leagues of MLB. Danny Jackson is the sole player to pitch an immaculate inning in the World Series.Of the 23 players eligible for the Baseball Hall of Fame who pitched an immaculate inning, thirteen have been elected and five were elected on the first ballot. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 major league seasons, and have either been retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months. These requirements leave 26 players ineligible who are active, four who are living and have played in the past five seasons, and eight who did not play in 10 major league seasons.

Matt Whisenant

Matthew Michael Whisenant (born June 8, 1971) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1990 and spent the 1992 season with the Phillies' Class A affiliate in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He was traded to the Florida Marlins for Danny Jackson in November 1992. He spent the next five seasons in the Marlins' minor league system before making his debut against the New York Mets. On July 29, 1997, he was traded to the Kansas City Royals for Matt Treanor. He was then released by the Royals in August 1999 and signed as a free agent by the San Diego Padres later that month. At the end of the 2000 season, he became a free agent and signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers on December 14 of that year. He played for the Dodgers' Class AAA team in Las Vegas in 2001.

SIU Edwardsville Cougars baseball

The SIU Edwardsville Cougars baseball team represents Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in NCAA Division I college baseball. They compete as members of the Ohio Valley Conference. SIUE plays its home games at Roy E. Lee Field at Simmons Baseball Complex, located in the northwest corner of the campus.

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