Danny Hoffman

Danny Hoffman (March 2, 1880 in Canton, Connecticut – March 22, 1922), was a professional baseball player who played outfield in the Major Leagues from 1903 to 1911. During his career Hoffman played for the Philadelphia Athletics, New York Highlanders, and St. Louis Browns.

When playing for the Springfield Ponies in 1902, they were playing a road game against Bridgeport. Hoffman batted a ball into the outfield, which struck and killed a horse.[1]

Danny Hoffman
Danny Hoffman
Danny Hoffman in 1906.
Outfielder
Born: March 2, 1880
Canton, Connecticut
Died: March 14, 1922 (aged 42)
Manchester, Connecticut
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
April 20, 1903, for the Philadelphia Athletics
Last MLB appearance
May 25, 1911, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Batting average.256
Runs batted in235
Stolen bases185
Teams
Career highlights and awards

See also

References

  1. ^ Haskin, Frederic J. (September 21, 1907). "Some Baseball Bunts". The Salt Lake Tribune.

External links

1880 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1880 throughout the world.

1903 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1903 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The team finished 2nd in the American League with a record of 75 wins and 60 losses, 14½ games behind the Boston Americans.

1904 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1904 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing fifth in the American League with a record of 81 wins and 70 losses.

1905 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1905 Philadelphia Athletics season was a season in American baseball. The team finished first in the American League with a record of 92 wins and 56 losses, winning their second pennant. They went on to face the New York Giants in the 1905 World Series, losing 4 games to 1.

The pitching staff featured three future Hall of Famers: Rube Waddell, Eddie Plank, and Chief Bender. Waddell easily won the pitching triple crown in 1905, with 27 wins, 287 strikeouts, and a 1.48 earned run average.

1906 New York Highlanders season

The 1906 New York Highlanders season, its fourth in New York and sixth overall, finished with the team in 2nd place in the American League with a record of 90–61. The team was managed by Clark Griffith and played its home games at Hilltop Park.

1906 Philadelphia Athletics season

The 1906 Philadelphia Athletics season involved the A's finishing fourth in the American League with a record of 78 wins and 67 losses.

1907 New York Highlanders season

The 1907 New York Highlanders season, its fifth in New York and its seventh overall, finished with the team in 5th place in the American League with a record of 70–78. Another notable newcomer was New York's recently acquired left fielder Branch Rickey, who would become well known for integrating Jackie Robinson into the major leagues some four decades later.

1908 St. Louis Browns season

The 1908 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 4th in the American League with a record of 83 wins and 69 losses.

1909 St. Louis Browns season

The 1909 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 7th in the American League with a record of 61 wins and 89 losses.

1910 St. Louis Browns season

The 1910 St. Louis Browns season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Browns finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 47 wins and 107 losses.

1911 St. Louis Browns season

The 1911 St. Louis Browns season involved the Browns finishing 8th in the American League with a record of 45 wins and 107 losses.

1922 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world.

Canton, Connecticut

Canton is a town, incorporated in 1806, in Hartford County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 8,840 at the 2000 census and 10,292 as of the 2010 census. It is bordered by Granby on the north, Simsbury on the east, Avon and Burlington on the south, New Hartford on the west, and Barkhamsted on the northwest. Running through it is the Farmington River. The town includes the villages of North Canton, Canton Center, Canton (Canton Valley), and Collinsville. In September 2007, Collinsville was ranked in Budget Travel magazine as one of the "Ten Coolest Small Towns In America".

Cy Young's perfect game

Cy Young, pitcher for the Boston Americans, pitched a perfect game against the Philadelphia Athletics by retiring all 27 batters he faced on Thursday, May 5, 1904. This event took place in the Huntington Avenue Grounds in Boston, Massachusetts, in front of 10,267 fans in attendance.

After Athletics' pitcher Rube Waddell defeated Young on April 25 and one-hit Boston on May 2, Waddell taunted Young to face him so that he could repeat his performance against Boston's ace. Three days later, Young pitched a perfect game against Waddell and the Athletics. The third perfect game in Major League Baseball history, Young's perfect game was the first in baseball's modern era and in American League history.

Hoffman

Hoffman is a surname of German origin. The original meaning in medieval times was "steward, i.e. one who manages the property of another". In English and other European languages, including Yiddish and Dutch, the name can also be spelt Hoffmann, Hofmann, Hofman, Huffman, Hofmans.

List of Major League Baseball annual home run leaders

In baseball, a home run is scored when the ball is hit so far that the batter is able to circle all the bases ending at home plate, scoring himself plus any runners already on base, with no errors by the defensive team on the play. An automatic home run is achieved by hitting the ball on the fly over the outfield fence in fair territory. More rarely, an inside-the-park home run occurs when the hitter reaches home plate while the baseball remains in play on the field. In Major League Baseball (MLB), a player in each league wins the home run title each season by hitting the most home runs that year. Only home runs hit in a particular league count towards that league's seasonal lead. Mark McGwire, for example, hit 58 home runs in 1997, more than any other player that year. However, McGwire was traded from the American League's (AL) Oakland Athletics to the National League's (NL) St. Louis Cardinals midway through the season and his individual AL and NL home run totals (34 and 24, respectively) did not qualify to lead either league.The first home run champion in the National League was George Hall. In the league's inaugural 1876 season, Hall hit five home runs for the short-lived National League Philadelphia Athletics. In 1901, the American League was established and Hall of Fame second baseman Nap Lajoie led it with 14 home runs for the American League Philadelphia Athletics. Over the course of his 22-season career, Babe Ruth led the American League in home runs 12 times. Mike Schmidt and Ralph Kiner have the second and third most home run titles respectively, Schmidt with eight and Kiner with seven, all won in the National League. Kiner's seven consecutive titles from 1946 to 1952 are also the most consecutive home run titles by any player.

Ruth set the Major League Baseball single-season home run record four times, first at 29 (1919), then 54 (1920), 59 (1921), and finally 60 (1927). Ruth's 1920 and 1921 seasons are tied for the widest margin of victory for a home run champion as he topped the next highest total by 35 home runs in each season. The single season mark of 60 stood for 34 years until Roger Maris hit 61 home runs in 1961. Maris' mark was broken 37 years later by both Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa during the 1998 home run record chase, with McGwire ultimately setting the mark at 70. Barry Bonds, who also has the most career home runs, set the current single season record of 73 in 2001. The 1998 and 2001 seasons each had 4 players hit 50 or more home runs – Greg Vaughn, Ken Griffey, Jr., Sosa, and McGwire in 1998 and Alex Rodriguez, Luis Gonzalez, Sosa, and Bonds in 2001. A player has hit 50 or more home runs 42 times, 25 times since 1990. The lowest home run total to lead a major league was four, recorded in the NL by Lip Pike in 1877 and Paul Hines in 1878.

List of Major League Baseball annual stolen base leaders

Major League Baseball recognizes stolen base leaders in the American League and National League each season.

Timeline of Freetown

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Freetown, Sierra Leone.

Timeline of Monrovia

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Monrovia, Liberia.

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