Danny Goodwin

Danny Kay Goodwin (born September 2, 1953) is a retired Major League Baseball player. He is the only baseball player to be drafted first overall in the Major League draft in two separate drafts.[1]

Danny Goodwin
Designated hitter / First baseman
Born: September 2, 1953 (age 65)
St. Louis, Missouri
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 3, 1975, for the California Angels
Last MLB appearance
July 7, 1982, for the Oakland Athletics
MLB statistics
Batting average.236
Home runs13
Runs batted in81
Teams

1971 & 1975 draft first overall pick

Goodwin was initially drafted first overall by the Chicago White Sox in the 1971 Major League Baseball draft straight out of Peoria Central High School. He chose, instead, to attend Southern University and A&M in Baton Rouge. He batted .394 with twenty home runs & 166 runs batted in for SUBR. He was a three time All-America, at the NAIA level his sophomore & junior year, and at the NCAA level his senior year, and was named the Sporting News 1975 College Player of the Year. Shortly afterwards, the California Angels selected him first overall pick in the 1975 Major League Baseball draft, and signed him for a major league record $150,000.

California Angels

Eager to get their top prospect to the majors as quickly as possible, the Angels assigned Goodwin to the double A El Paso Diablos upon his signing. Joining El Paso midway through the 1975 season, Goodwin batted .275 with two home runs & eighteen RBIs. He was called up to California in September, and had just one hit (off the Kansas City Royals' Steve Busby[2]) in ten at bats.

Goodwin split 1976 between El Paso & the California League Salinas Angels. He batted over .300 for both clubs, while hitting eight home runs & driving in 69. Playing triple A ball for the first time in his career in 1977, Goodwin batted .305 with ten home runs & 66 RBIs in half a season with the Salt Lake City Gulls to earn a call back up to the majors in mid July. On July 29, Goodwin hit his first career home run off Hall of Famer Fergie Jenkins.[3] He would end the season with a .209 batting average, eight RBIs & just the one home run.

Goodwin started the 1978 season in El Paso, and absolutely tore up the Texas League. In 101 games, Goodwin batted .360 with 25 home runs & 89 RBIs. He was called up to the majors that August, and seemed to finally display the promise that made him the first overall pick in two drafts. He batted .283 with two home runs & ten RBIs in August. After the season, he & first baseman Ron Jackson were traded to the Minnesota Twins for outfielder Dan Ford. Though Goodwin was a catcher in high school & college, he was only ever used as a designated hitter or pinch hitter by the Angels, and never saw any on the field action.

Minnesota Twins

Goodwin, who was never a very good fielding catcher, was converted into a first baseman by the Twins (though used primarily as a DH his first two seasons in Minnesota). His first season with the Twins stands as his best major league season. After once again starting the season in triple A, Goodwin joined the Twins midway through the 1979 season.[4] In half a season, Goodwin batted .289 with five home runs & 27 RBIs, all career highs.

Though Goodwin spent a full season in the majors for the first time in his career in 1980, he didn't see much playing time. Appearing in just 55 games, he batted .200 with one home run & eleven RBIs. Likewise, he appeared in 59 games in 1981, and batted just .225. He was released after the season.

Oakland A's

Goodwin signed with the Oakland Athletics, and spent the 1982 season going back & forth between them & the triple A Tacoma Tigers. While putting together an exceptional season for Tacoma (.301 avg., 11 home runs, 58 RBIs), Goodwin batted just .212 with two home runs & eight RBIs for the A's. He spent the next two seasons at Tacoma, where he batted .294 with 32 home runs & 147 RBIs, but never returned to the majors. After his major and minor league career, he played for the Nankai Hawks in Nippon Professional Baseball in 1986.

Career statistics

Games PA AB Runs Hits 2B 3B HR RBI SB BB HBP SO Avg. OBP Slg. Fld%
252 707 636 72 150 32 8 13 81 3 61 0 137 .236 .301 .373 .994

Once his playing days ended, Goodwin served as the Atlanta Braves' director of community relations, and later, as director of the Braves’ foundation, developing programs for underprivileged children in the city.[5] In 2011, Goodwin became the first player from a historically black university to be inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame.[6] While at SUBR, Goodwin also earned a degree in premed zoology.[7]

Sources

  1. ^ Schwarz, Alan (June 4, 2002). "Where have you gone, Danny Goodwin?". ESPN.
  2. ^ "Kansas City Royals 5, California Angels 2". Baseball-Reference.com. September 5, 1975.
  3. ^ "Boston Red Sox 6, California Angels 5". Baseball-Reference.com. July 29, 1977.
  4. ^ "Weaver Says 'Deep Depth' is Why His Orioles Fly High". Toledo Blade. July 24, 1979. p. 23.
  5. ^ Markusen, Bruce (June 5, 2009). "The legend of Danny Goodwin". The Hardball Times.
  6. ^ "Southern University's Danny Goodwin Gets National College Baseball Hall of Fame Nod". The Official Website of Southern University Athletics. February 22, 2011.
  7. ^ Neyer, Rob (June 2, 2017). "Danny Goodwin & the Risk of the Pick". www.thenationalpastimemuseum.com. The National Pastime Museum.

External links

1975 California Angels season

The 1975 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing sixth in the American League West with a record of 72 wins and 89 losses.

California hit 55 home runs for the entire season. This caused Boston Red Sox pitcher Bill Lee to say about the team- "could take batting practice in a hotel lobby without damaging a chandelier."

1975 Major League Baseball season

The 1975 Major League Baseball season saw Frank Robinson become the first black manager in the Major Leagues. He managed the Cleveland Indians.

At the All-Star Break, there were discussions of Bowie Kuhn's reappointment. Charlie Finley, New York owner George Steinbrenner and Baltimore owner Jerry Hoffberger were part of a group that wanted him gone. Finley was trying to convince the new owner of the Texas Rangers Brad Corbett that MLB needed a more dynamic commissioner. During the vote, Baltimore and New York decided to vote in favour of the commissioner's reappointment. In addition, there were discussions of expansion for 1977, with Seattle and Washington, D.C. as the proposed cities for expansion.

1978 California Angels season

The 1978 California Angels season involved the Angels finishing second in the American League West with a record of 87 wins and 75 losses.

Late in the season, the Angels suffered the loss of outfielder Lyman Bostock when Bostock was murdered on September 24 in Gary, Indiana.

1979 Minnesota Twins season

The 1979 Minnesota Twins season was a season in American baseball. The team finished 82-80, fourth in the American League West.

1980 Minnesota Twins season

The 1980 Minnesota Twins season was a season in American baseball. The Twins finished 77-84, third in the American League West. 769,206 fans attended Twins games, the lowest total in the American League.

Dan Ford

Darnell Glenn Ford (born May 19, 1952) is a former professional baseball player. Nicknamed "Disco Dan", he played in the Major Leagues primarily as an outfielder from 1975 to 1985 for the Minnesota Twins, California Angels, and Baltimore Orioles. In 1,153 career games, Ford had a batting average of .270, 121 home runs and 566 runs batted in.

List of Chicago White Sox first-round draft picks

The Chicago White Sox are a Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise based in Chicago, Illinois. They play in the American League Central division. Since the institution of MLB's Rule 4 Draft, the White Sox have selected 65 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is MLB's primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks.Of the 65 players picked in the first round by the Chicago White Sox, 31 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 20 of them were right-handed, while 11 were left-handed. Twelve outfielders, eight catchers, five shortstops, five third basemen, and four first basemen were also taken. The team has never drafted a player at second base. Fourteen of the players came from high schools or universities in the state of California, and Florida follows with eight players. The White Sox have also drafted six players from their home state of Illinois.One White Sox first-round pick is a member of the Hall of Fame; Frank Thomas (1989) was elected to the Hall at his first opportunity in 2014. One player has won a championship with the team; Aaron Rowand (1998) was part of the 2005 World Series championship team. Thomas was a member of the White Sox for 16 years, including the 2005 season, but was not part of the World Series roster due to injury. Thomas is also the only first-round draft pick to win the Most Valuable Player Award, winning the American League honors in both 1993 and 1994. One pick, 1987 selection Jack McDowell, has won the Cy Young Award with the team; he won it in 1993. The White Sox had the first overall selection twice in the draft, which they used on Danny Goodwin (1971) and Harold Baines (1977).

The White Sox have made 16 selections in the supplemental round of the draft and 5 compensatory picks since the institution of the First-Year Player Draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the previous off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The White Sox have failed to sign three of their first-round picks: Danny Goodwin (1971), Steve Buechele (1979), and Bobby Seay (1996). The White Sox did not receive any compensation for Goodwin or Buechele, but they did receive the 51st pick in 1997 for failing to sign Seay.

List of Los Angeles Angels first-round draft picks

The Los Angeles Angels are a Major League Baseball franchise based in Anaheim, California. They play in the American League West division. Since the institution of Major League Baseball's Rule 4 Draft in 1965, the Angels have selected 62 players in the first round. Officially known as the "First-Year Player Draft", the Rule 4 Draft is Major League Baseball's primary mechanism for assigning amateur players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur clubs to its teams. The draft order is determined based on the previous season's standings, with the team possessing the worst record receiving the first pick. In addition, teams which lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded compensatory or supplementary picks.Of the 62 players drafted by the Angels, 28 have been pitchers, the most of any position; 18 of these were right-handed, while 10 were left-handed. Twelve outfielders, seven shortstops, four third basemen, and four first basemen were also taken. No second basemen have been selected. Thirteen of the players came from high schools or universities in the state of California, while Florida follows with six players. Four players have been selected from both Illinois and Georgia. All players selected have been from the United States. The franchise has made five selections in the same draft three times, in 1986, 2009, and 2010.Two Angels first-round picks, outfielder Darin Erstad (1995) and third basemen Troy Glaus (1997), played with the 2002 World Series championship team. Outfielder Mike Trout, who was chosen in 2009 and has spent his entire MLB career to date with the Angels, was named American League Rookie of the Year in 2012, and finished no worse than second in voting for American League Most Valuable Player in each of his first five full seasons with the Angels, winning that award in 2014 and 2016. Pitcher Jim Abbott (1988), born without a right hand, won the 1987 Golden Spikes Award while playing at the University of Michigan, and the 1992 Tony Conigliaro Award and the 1995 Hutch Award while with the Angels. Danny Goodwin (1975), who was picked first overall in 1971 by the Chicago White Sox but opted for four years of college, is the only player to be selected first in the draft on two separate occasions.The team has made 13 selections in the supplemental round of the draft and 21 compensatory picks since the institution of the First-Year Player Draft in 1965. These additional picks are provided when a team loses a particularly valuable free agent in the prior off-season, or, more recently, if a team fails to sign a draft pick from the previous year. The Angels have failed to sign one of their first-round picks, Alan Bannister (1969), but received no compensation. The franchise has made the first overall selection twice, in 1975 and 1995.

List of first overall Major League Baseball draft picks

The First-Year Player Draft, also known as the Rule 4 Draft, is Major League Baseball's (MLB) primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs to its teams. Unlike most professional sports, MLB does not permit the trading of draft picks, so the draft order is solely determined by the previous season's standings; the team that possesses the worst record receives the first pick. If two teams have identical records, the team with the worse record in the previous season will receive the higher pick. In addition, teams that lost free agents in the previous off-season may be awarded "compensatory" picks. The first draft took place in 1965; it was introduced to prevent richer teams from negotiating wealthier contracts with top-level prospects and therefore, monopolizing the player market. Originally, three drafts were held each year. The first draft took place in June and involved high-school graduates and college seniors who had just finished their seasons. The second draft took place in January for high school and college players who had graduated in December. The third draft took place in August and was for players who participated in American amateur summer leagues. The August draft was eliminated after two years, and the January draft lasted until 1986.In 1965, Rick Monday became MLB's first draft pick after being selected by the Kansas City Athletics. Adley Rutschman is the most recent first overall pick; he was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in 2019. Overall, 23 of the 50 picks before 2015 have participated in the All-Star Game, and four (Bob Horner, Darryl Strawberry, Bryce Harper, and Carlos Correa) have won the Rookie of the Year Award. Twenty-five of the fifty picks before 2015 have been drafted from high schools, one has been drafted out of the Independent American Association, and the others were drafted from universities. To date, Arizona State University and Vanderbilt University are the only schools from which multiple number-one overall draft picks have been chosen. No first overall pick was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame until 2016, when Ken Griffey Jr. was inducted with a record 99.3% of votes cast. Griffey has since been joined by two other top picks, with Chipper Jones inducted in 2018 and Harold Baines elected in December 2018 and inducted in July 2019.In the 54 drafts that have taken place through 2018, 22 of the 30 MLB franchises have had the first pick at least once. The Toronto Blue Jays, St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Dodgers, San Francisco Giants, Cleveland Indians, Cincinnati Reds, Boston Red Sox, and Colorado Rockies have never had the first pick. The Montreal Expos never had the first pick, but the Nationals have had it twice. The Oakland Athletics have never had the first pick, but the Kansas City Athletics had the very first pick in MLB Draft history. The New York Mets, San Diego Padres, and Houston Astros have each had the first pick five times, and the Seattle Mariners, Pittsburgh Pirates, and Tampa Bay Rays have each had the first pick four times.

National College Baseball Hall of Fame

The National College Baseball Hall of Fame is an institution operated by the College Baseball Foundation serving as the central point for the study of the history of college baseball in the United States. In partnership with the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library located on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, the Hall of Fame inducts former collegiate players and coaches who have met selection criteria of distinction.

Peoria High School (Peoria, Illinois)

Peoria High School is a public high school in Peoria, Illinois. Peoria High School was established in 1856 and is the second oldest continually operating high school west of the Allegheny Mountains after Evansville Central High School in Indiana. Peoria High is located at 1615 N. North Street and moved to this location in 1916. Peoria High School is commonly referred to as "Central" to distinguish it from Richwoods and Manual, and it is centrally located in Peoria. Peoria is the only city in the tri-county area with multiple high schools.

The school had a 150th all-school reunion and celebration in June 2006 at the Peoria Civic Center.

I.H.S.A. Speech Team Champions 1978.

Southern Jaguars baseball

The Southern Jaguars baseball team is a varsity intercollegiate athletic team of Southern University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States. The team is a member of the Southwestern Athletic Conference, which is part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I. The team plays its home games at Lee–Hines Field in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Step Up to the Microphone

Step Up to the Microphone is the seventh studio album by Christian pop rock band Newsboys, released in 1998 through Star Song Communications. It was the Newsboys' first album following the departure of lead singer John James in 1997, with Peter Furler and Phil Joel subsequently sharing lead vocal duties.

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