Dangerous Visions

Dangerous Visions is a science fiction short story anthology edited by American writer Harlan Ellison and illustrated by Leo and Diane Dillon. It was published in 1967.

A path-breaking collection, Dangerous Visions helped define the New Wave science fiction movement, particularly in its depiction of sex in science fiction. Writer/editor Al Sarrantonio[1] writes how Dangerous Visions "almost single-handedly [...] changed the way readers thought about science fiction."

Contributors to the volume included 20 authors who had won, or would win, a Hugo, Nebula, World Fantasy, or BSFA award, and 16 with multiple such awards. Ellison introduced the anthology both collectively and individually while authors provided afterwords to their own stories.

Dangerous Visions
DangerousVisions(1stEd)
Cover of first edition (hardcover)
AuthorEdited by Harlan Ellison
IllustratorLeo and Diane Dillon
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreScience fiction
PublisherDoubleday
Publication date
1967
Media typePrint (Hardcover & Paperback)
Pages544
Followed byAgain, Dangerous Visions 

Description

Advertisements described Dangerous Visions as "For the first time anywhere—33 great new stories by all the science fiction masters of our time", and "Not collected from magazines, not collected from other books ... one of the biggest anthologies of original material ever assembled in any field".[2]

Awards and nominations

The stories and the anthology itself were nominated for and received many awards. "Gonna Roll the Bones" by Fritz Leiber received both a Hugo Award and a Nebula Award for Best novelette, whilst Philip K. Dick's submission "Faith of Our Fathers" was a nominee for the Hugo in the same category. Philip José Farmer tied for the Hugo Award for Best Novella for "Riders of the Purple Wage". Samuel R. Delany won the Nebula for Best Short Story for "Aye, and Gomorrah..." Harlan Ellison received a special citation at the 26th World SF Convention for editing "the most significant and controversial SF book published in 1967."

Reception

"You should buy this book immediately", Algis Budrys wrote, "because this is a book that knows perfectly that you are seething inside". He especially praised "Sex and/or Mr. Morrison".[3]

Sequels

The popular collection was followed by an even larger 1972 sequel, Again, Dangerous Visions. The projected third collection, The Last Dangerous Visions, was started, but controversially remains unpublished. The final book has become something of a legend as science fiction's most famous unpublished book. It was originally announced for publication in 1973, but other work demanded Ellison's attention and the anthology has not seen print to date. He has come under criticism for his treatment of some writers who submitted their stories to him, whom some estimate to number nearly 150 (and many of whom have died in the ensuing more than four decades since the anthology was first announced). In 1993 Ellison threatened to sue New England Science Fiction Association (NESFA) for publishing "Himself in Anachron", a short story written by Cordwainer Smith and sold to Ellison for the book by his widow,[4] but later reached an amicable settlement.[5] British SF author Christopher Priest critiqued Ellison's editorial practices in a widely disseminated article titled "The Book on the Edge of Forever".[6] Priest documented a half-dozen instances in which Ellison promised TLDV would appear within a year of the statement, but did not fulfill those promises. Ellison had a record of fulfilling obligations in other instances, including to writers whose stories he solicited, and expressed outrage at other editors who have displayed poor practices.

Contents

Illustrations by Leo and Diane Dillon accompany each short story.

References

  1. ^ Sarrantonio, Al, editor. 999: New Stories of Horror and Suspense. 1999. Avon Books. ISBN 0-380-97740-0
  2. ^ "For the first time anywhere—33 great new stories by all the science fiction masters of our time". Galaxy Science Fiction (advertisement). December 1967. p. 3.
  3. ^ Budrys, Algis (April 1968). "Galaxy Bookshelf". Galaxy Science Fiction. pp. 155–163.
  4. ^ "ConFrancisco Continued". Ansible. 76. November 1993. ISSN 0265-9816.
  5. ^ "Infinitely Improbable". Ansible. 77. December 1993. ISSN 0265-9816.
  6. ^ "The Last Deadloss Visions". Archived from the original on May 31, 2015. Retrieved 2006. Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)

External links

A Toy for Juliette

"A Toy for Juliette" is a 1967 science fiction and horror short story by American writer Robert Bloch, appearing for the first time in Harlan Ellison's anthology Dangerous Visions.

Again, Dangerous Visions

Again, Dangerous Visions (17 March 1972) is a science fiction short story anthology, edited by Harlan Ellison. It is the follow-up to Dangerous Visions (October 1967), also edited by Ellison. Cover art and interior illustrations are by Ed Emshwiller.

Like its predecessor, Again, Dangerous Visions, and many of the collected stories, have received awards recognition. "The Word for World is Forest", by Ursula K. Le Guin, won the 1973 Hugo for Best Novella. "When It Changed" by Joanna Russ won a 1972 Nebula Award for Best Short Story. Harlan Ellison was recognized with a special Hugo Award for anthologizing, his second special award, in 1972.Again, Dangerous Visions was released as a two-volume paperback edition by Signet in the United States, and by Pan in the United Kingdom. A sequel was planned, The Last Dangerous Visions, but was never published.

The first edition was a hardback limited release of 6,500 numbered and signed copies.

Arthur Byron Cover

Arthur Byron Cover (born January 14, 1950, in Grundy, Virginia) is an American science fiction author.

Cover attended the Clarion Writer's SF Workshop in New Orleans in 1971, and made his first professional short-story sale to Harlan Ellison's The Last Dangerous Visions.

Cover's short stories have appeared in Infinity Five, Alternities, The Alien Condition, Weird Heroes #6, The Year's Best Horror #4 and #5, Wild Cards #5: Down & Dirty, and Pulphouse. He has also written several comic books, including two issues of Daredevil (one of them with Ellison), and Space Clusters, a graphic novel from DC Comics illustrated by Alex Niño — plus several animation scripts, and reviews and articles for such august publications as The New York Review of Science Fiction.

Cover's first novel, Autumn Angels, was the second of Harlan Ellison's Discovery Series of new authors for Pyramid Books, and was nominated for a Nebula Award. The novel has been described as "a stylistic cross-breed of Ellison and Vonnegut, and as such both predates and bests Douglas Adams in creating a comic, literary fantasy."Cover currently manages the "Dangerous Visions" science fiction book sales website. The website takes its name from the Dangerous Visions anthology edited in 1967 by Harlan Ellison. Cover was also a judge for the 2005 Philip K. Dick Award.

Aye, and Gomorrah

"Aye, and Gomorrah..." is a science fiction short story by American writer Samuel R. Delany. It is the first short story Delany sold, and won the 1967 Nebula Award for best short story. Before it appeared in Driftglass and Aye, and Gomorrah, and other stories, it first appeared as the final story in Harlan Ellison's seminal 1967 anthology, Dangerous Visions. It was controversial because of its disturbing sexual subject matter, and has been called "one of the best stories by a gay man published in the 1960s." Graham Sleight has described it as a "revisionist take" on Cordwainer Smith's story "Scanners Live in Vain".

Driftglass

Driftglass is a 1971 collection of science fiction short stories by American writer Samuel R. Delany. The stories originally appeared in the magazines Worlds of Tomorrow, The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, If and New Worlds or the anthologies Quark/3, Dangerous Visions and Alchemy & Academe.

Eutopia (short story)

"Eutopia" is a short story by American writer Poul Anderson, originally appeared in Harlan Ellison's 1967 science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions. It later appeared in Anderson's 1981 collection The Dark Between the Stars and the showcase The Best Alternate History Stories of the 20th Century (2001).

Faith of Our Fathers (short story)

"Faith of Our Fathers" is a science fiction short story by American writer Philip K. Dick, first published in the anthology Dangerous Visions (1967).

Gonna Roll the Bones

"Gonna Roll the Bones" is a fantasy short story by American writer Fritz Leiber, in which a character plays craps with Death. First published in Harlan Ellison's Dangerous Visions, it won both the Hugo Award and Nebula Award for Best Novelette.

The story was adapted as a children's book, written by Sarah L. Thomson, illustrated by David Wiesner, and published in 2004 by Milk and Cookies Press.

Harlan Ellison

Harlan Jay Ellison (May 27, 1934 – June 28, 2018) was an American writer, known for his prolific and influential work in New Wave speculative fiction, and for his outspoken, combative personality. Robert Bloch, the author of Psycho, described Ellison as "the only living organism I know whose natural habitat is hot water".His published works include more than 1,700 short stories, novellas, screenplays, comic book scripts, teleplays, essays, and a wide range of criticism covering literature, film, television, and print media. Some of his best-known work includes the Star Trek episode "The City on the Edge of Forever", his A Boy and His Dog cycle, and his short stories "I Have No Mouth, and I Must Scream" and " 'Repent, Harlequin!' Said the Ticktockman". He was also editor and anthologist for Dangerous Visions (1967) and Again, Dangerous Visions (1972). Ellison won numerous awards, including multiple Hugos, Nebulas, and Edgars.

If All Men Were Brothers, Would You Let One Marry Your Sister?

"If All Men Were Brothers, Would You Let One Marry Your Sister?" is a science fiction short story by American writer Theodore Sturgeon. It first appeared in Harlan Ellison's anthology Dangerous Visions in 1967.

Riders of the Purple Wage

Riders of the Purple Wage is a science fiction novella by Philip José Farmer. It appeared in Dangerous Visions, the New Wave science fiction anthology compiled by Harlan Ellison, in 1967, and won the Hugo Award for best novella in 1968, jointly with Weyr Search by Anne McCaffrey.

The Best of Larry Niven

The Best of Larry Niven is a collection of science fiction and fantasy stories written by Larry Niven and edited by Jonathan Strahan, first published in hardcover by Subterranean Press in December 2010. The pieces were originally published between 1965 and 2000 in the magazines The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, If, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Galaxy Magazine, Knight, Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, Vertex: the Magazine of Science Fiction, Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine, Omni and Playboy, the anthologies Dangerous Visions, Quark/4, Ten Tomorrows, and What Might Have Been? Volume 1: Alternate Empires, the novel The Magic Goes Away, and the collections All the Myriad Ways and The Flight of the Horse.The book contains twenty-five short stories, novelettes and novellas, one novel, and one essay by the author, together with an introduction by Jerry Pournelle.

The Best of Philip K. Dick

The Best of Philip K. Dick is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Philip K. Dick. It was first published by Del Rey Books in 1977. Many of the stories had originally appeared in the magazines Planet Stories, Fantasy and Science Fiction, Space Science Fiction, Imagination, Astounding Stories, Galaxy Science Fiction, Amazing Stories, Science Fiction Stories and Startling Stories, as well as the anthologies Dangerous Visions and Star Science Fiction Stories No.3.

The Doll-House

"The Doll-House" is a short story by Hugh Parry, under the name "James Cross". It was first published in Harlan Ellison's 1967 science fiction anthology Dangerous Visions.

The Jigsaw Man

"The Jigsaw Man" is a short story in the Known Space universe by Larry Niven. The story was first published in Harlan Ellison's anthology Dangerous Visions, and is included in Niven's collections All the Myriad Ways and Tales of Known Space.

The Last Dangerous Visions

The Last Dangerous Visions is a mooted sequel to the science fiction short story anthologies Dangerous Visions and Again, Dangerous Visions, originally published in 1967 and 1972 respectively. Like the first two, it was scheduled to be edited by Harlan Ellison, with introductions provided by him.

The projected third collection was started but, controversially, has yet to be finished. It has become something of a legend in science fiction as the genre's most famous unpublished book. It was originally announced for publication in 1973, but the anthology has not seen print to date. Ellison came under criticism for his treatment of some writers who submitted their stories to him, who some estimate to number nearly 150. Many of these writers have since died.

Various difficulties delayed publication many times. As recently as May 2007, Ellison said he still wanted to get the book out.British author Christopher Priest, whose story "An Infinite Summer" had been accepted for the collection, wrote a lengthy critique of Ellison's failure to complete the LDV project. It was first published by Priest as a one-shot fanzine called The Last Deadloss Visions, a pun on the title of Priest's own fanzine, Deadloss. It proved so popular that it had a total of three printings in the UK and later, in book form, as the 1995 Hugo Award nominated The Book on the Edge of Forever (an allusion to Ellison's Star Trek episode, "The City on the Edge of Forever") by American publisher Fantagraphics Books. The essay is available online at the Internet Archive mirror of the original site.

On June 28, 2018, Ellison died, with the anthology still unpublished. The fate of the anthology, and/or the stories submitted for it, remains unclear.

The Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World

"The Prowler in the City at the Edge of the World" is a short story by American writer Harlan Ellison, first published in his 1967 anthology Dangerous Visions. It was intended as a continuation of a story by Robert Bloch, "A Toy for Juliette", which also appears in the anthology.

When It Changed

"When It Changed" is a science fiction short story by Joanna Russ. It was first published in the anthology Again, Dangerous Visions.

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