Dan Quisenberry

Daniel Raymond "Quiz" Quisenberry[1] (/ˈkwɪzənbɛri/; February 7, 1953 – September 30, 1998) was an American right-handed relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played primarily for the Kansas City Royals.[2][3] Notable for his submarine-style pitching delivery and his humorous quotes, he led the American League in saves a record five times (1980, 1982–85), and retired in 1990 with 244 saves, then the 6th-highest total in major league history.

Dan Quisenberry has the lowest ratio of base on balls per innings pitched for any pitcher to pitch in the major leagues since the 1920s, and the lowest ratio for any pitcher to pitch since the 1800s except for Deacon Phillippe and Babe Adams.[4]

Dan Quisenberry
Dan Quisenberry 1986
Quisenberry in 1986.
Pitcher
Born: February 7, 1953
Santa Monica, California
Died: September 30, 1998 (aged 45)
Leawood, Kansas
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 8, 1979, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
April 23, 1990, for the San Francisco Giants
MLB statistics
Win–loss record56–46
Earned run average2.76
Strikeouts379
Saves244
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Dan Quisenberry pitching
Quisenberry pitching for the Kansas City Royals

Born in Santa Monica, California, Quisenberry played baseball at Costa Mesa High School and graduated in 1971. He then went to Orange Coast College and then onto Division III University of La Verne in La Verne, California. He went on to sign with the Royals as an amateur free agent in 1975, and was considered a marginal prospect. At the age of 26, he made his major league debut with the Kansas City Royals in 1979 on July 8, against the Chicago White Sox, pitching 2⅔ scoreless innings, and surrendering just two hits and no walks. Quisenberry appeared in 32 games and posted a 3–2 record with a 3.15 earned run average and five saves.

During spring training the following year, manager Jim Frey suggested that Quisenberry learn the submarine-style delivery from Pittsburgh Pirates reliever Kent Tekulve to confuse hitters, because he could not overpower them with a fastball. From 1980 to 1985, Quisenberry was the American League's dominant closer leading the American League in saves all six season (with the exception of the strike-shortened 1981 season). During that same span, he posted an ERA of 2.45 and won the Rolaids Relief Man Award each season. He also finished in the top five in voting for the Cy Young Award during this span.

Quisenberry was hardly the prototypical closing pitcher. Unlike many of his peers, he didn't possess a hard fastball, and thus had to rely on pinpoint control, guile, and deception, which was augmented by the submarine delivery he first used in 1980. His primary pitch was a sinking fastball, which causes hitters to hit the ball on the ground rather than in the air. He also possessed a curveball in his repertoire, as well as a changeup he developed in 1984.[5] and an occasional knuckleball. Although Quisenberry was not a strikeout pitcher, he offset this deficiency by seldom walking batters or throwing wild pitches. His 45 saves in 1983 was briefly a single-season record (tied in 1984 by Bruce Sutter and broken in 1986 by Dave Righetti). Quisenberry was the first pitcher in major league history to save more than 40 games in a season twice in his career. He won a World Series with the Royals in 1985 and was the winning pitcher of Game 6, notorious for Don Denkinger's blown call at first base.

In 1983, the Royals signed Quisenberry to a lifetime contract, similar to the contract of his teammate, George Brett. However, a rocky start in 1988 led to Quisenberry's relegation to middle relief and mop-up duty. Shortly before the All-Star break, he was released by the Royals. Ten days later the St. Louis Cardinals, managed by ex-Royals manager Whitey Herzog, signed Quisenberry as a free agent. After pitching for a year and a half in St. Louis, Quisenberry signed to play with the San Francisco Giants in 1990. He tore his rotator cuff just five appearances into the 1990 season, and was faced with serious injury for the first time in his career. At the age of 37, after 12 seasons in the majors, Quisenberry retired.

In the 1996 Hall of Fame Balloting by the Baseball Writers' Association of America, Quisenberry received 18 votes, just under the 24 vote (5%) cut-off to remain on the ballot. In the same election, Bruce Sutter – a pitcher with remarkably similar overall statistics[6] – received 137 votes; Sutter went on to be elected to the Hall of Fame in 2006. In 2013, Quisenberry's Hall of Fame candidacy was given a second look by the HOF Expansion Era Committee, which reexamines the credentials of overlooked players from 1973–present, but he fell short of the 12 votes needed from the 16-member panel.[7]

Along with Sutter and Rich Gossage, he was at the forefront of the transition from relief ace to the La Russian ninth inning closer. Quisenberry's Adjusted ERA+ of 146 ties him for eighth all-time among qualifying pitchers.[8] His career rate of walks per 9 innings pitched is the lowest since 1926.[9] In addition, Quisenberry accrued the 22nd most all-time Cy Young shares.[10]

Post-career

After his baseball career ended, Quisenberry embarked on a second career as a poet, publishing three poems in 1995 and a book of poetry titled On Days Like This in 1998. He also emerged as one of baseball's most quotable characters, with bon mots like "I found a delivery in my flaw" and "I've seen the future and it's much like the present, only longer."[11]. At least the latter quote, however, had been published verbatim nearly two decades prior, in the satirical collection of poems "The Profit", written under the pseudonym Kehlog Albran. [12]

In January 1998, Quisenberry was diagnosed with grade IV astrocytoma, a highly malignant form of brain cancer.[13] He died at age 45 in September 1998 in Leawood, Kansas.[3]

Records

See also

Further reading

  • Angell, Roger (1988). Season Ticket: A Baseball Companion. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-395-38165-7.

References

  1. ^ http://www.familytreelegends.com/records/calbirths?c=search&first=Dan&last=Quisenberry&spelling=Exact&4_year=&4_month=0&4_day=0&5=Male&7=&SubmitSearch.x=68&SubmitSearch.y=8
  2. ^ Tucker, Doug (October 1, 1998). "Ex=Royal Quisenberry dead at age 45". Lawrence Journal-World. (Kansas). Associated Press. p. 1C.
  3. ^ a b "Ex-hurler Quiz dies of cancer". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). October 1, 1998. p. C6.
  4. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Bases On Balls per 9 IP". Retrieved 2018-12-12.
  5. ^ The Neyer/James Guide to Pitchers: An Historical Compendium of Pitching, Pitchers, and Pitches. Bill James and Rob Neyer. 2004.
  6. ^ "Not in Hall of Fame - 101. Dan Quisenberry", Not in Hall of Fame. Accessed October 10, 2018.
  7. ^ "Dan Quisenberry not picked by Hall of Fame committee",The Kansas City Star.
  8. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Adjusted ERA+", Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed July 25, 2007.
  9. ^ "Career Leaders & Records for Bases on Balls/9IP", Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed July 25, 2007.
  10. ^ "MVP and CY Young Award Share Leaders", Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed July 25, 2007.
  11. ^ Baseball Almanac quotes
  12. ^ poem The Profit
  13. ^ Henderson, Heather (1999). "Dan Quisenberry – In His Own Words". The 1999 Big Bad Baseball Annual. Retrieved June 24, 2013.
  14. ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/h/hollagr01.shtml

External links

1980 American League Championship Series

The 1980 American League Championship Series featured the Kansas City Royals facing the team that had defeated them three straight years in the ALCS from 1976–78, the New York Yankees.

1980 Kansas City Royals season

The 1980 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. The Royals finished first in the American League West with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They went on to sweep the New York Yankees in the ALCS, then lost to the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1980 World Series, four games to two.

One of the highlights of the season was George Brett winning the American League batting title. Brett's .390 batting average was the highest in the majors since Ted Williams hit .406 in 1941.

1980 World Series

The 1980 World Series was the 77th edition of Major League Baseball's championship series and the conclusion of the 1980 Major League Baseball season. A best-of-seven playoff, it matched the National League (NL) champion Philadelphia Phillies against the American League (AL) champion Kansas City Royals. The Phillies defeated the Royals four games to two to capture the club's first World Series championship in franchise history. Phillies third baseman Mike Schmidt was named as the World Series MVP. The series concluded with Game 6, which ended with Tug McGraw striking out Willie Wilson at 11:29 pm on October 21, 1980. Wilson set a World Series record by striking out twelve times (after getting 230 hits in the regular season) in the six-game set.

Game 6 is also significant because it stands as the "most-watched game in World Series history" with a television audience of 54.9 million viewers.The Kansas City Royals became the second expansion team, and the first American League expansion team, to appear in the World Series. The AL would have to wait until 1985 before one of their expansion teams—the Royals themselves—would win a World Series.

This was the first World Series played entirely on artificial turf. This was also the first World Series since 1920, and the last to date, in which neither team had won a World Series before, making the only remaining possible such combination a competition between the AL's Seattle Mariners and the NL's Washington Nationals. With their victory, the Phillies became the final team out of the original sixteen MLB teams to win a World Series. However, a Philadelphia team had won a World Series before, the last being the Philadelphia Athletics in 1930, exactly a half-century before this Series; in a twist of fate, the Athletics would play thirteen years in Kansas City before eventually settling in Oakland.

1982 Major League Baseball season

The 1982 Major League Baseball season. Making up for their playoff miss of the year before, the St. Louis Cardinals won their ninth World Series championship, defeating the Milwaukee Brewers, four games to three.

1984 American League Championship Series

The 1984 American League Championship Series matched the East Division champion Detroit Tigers against the West Division champion Kansas City Royals. The Tigers prevailed three games to none, to advance to the 1984 World Series against the San Diego Padres.

Due to a strike by major league umpires, the series was played using local and collegiate umpires, with former AL umpire and league supervisor Bill Deegan working home plate for all three games.

1984 Kansas City Royals season

The 1984 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 1st in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 78 losses. However, they would lose to the Detroit Tigers in 3 Games in the ALCS. The Tigers would go on to the World Series and defeat the San Diego Padres in 5 Games.

1984 Major League Baseball season

The 1984 Major League Baseball season started with a 9-game winning streak by eventual World Series champions Detroit Tigers who started the season 35 wins and 5 losses and never relinquished the first place lead.

1985 Kansas City Royals season

The 1985 Kansas City Royals season ended with the Royals' first world championship win over their intrastate rivals, the St. Louis Cardinals. The Royals won the Western Division of the American League for the second consecutive season and the sixth time in ten years. The team improved its record to 91–71 on the strength of its pitching, led by Bret Saberhagen's Cy Young Award-winning performance.

In the playoffs, the Royals went on to win the American League Championship Series for just the second time and the World Series for the first time (they previously lost the 1980 World Series). Both the ALCS and the World Series were won in seven games after the Royals lost the first two games at home and three of the first four games overall. The championship series against the Cardinals was forever remembered in St. Louis by umpires' supposedly blown calls in Game Six: one that cost the Royals a run in the 4th, and a blown call by umpire Don Denkinger that allowed Jorge Orta to reach first. The World Series is remembered in Kansas City as the culmination of ten years of dominance by the Royals, during which they reached the playoffs seven times, with stars such as George Brett, Hal McRae and Willie Wilson.

The team was managed by Dick Howser in his fourth and final full season with the Royals.

The Royals did not return to the postseason until 2014 and won the World Series again in 2015.

1985 World Series

The 1985 World Series began on October 19 and ended on October 27. The American League champions Kansas City Royals played the National League champions St. Louis Cardinals, with the Royals upsetting the heavily favored Cardinals in seven games. The Series was popularly known as the "Show-Me Series" or the "I-70 Showdown Series," as both cities are in the state of Missouri and are connected by Interstate 70.

The Cardinals won the National League East division by three games over the New York Mets, then defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers four games to two in the National League Championship Series. The Royals won the American League West division by one game over the California Angels, then defeated the Toronto Blue Jays four games to three in the American League Championship Series.

The Cardinals were seeking to win their NL-leading 10th World Series title, while the Royals were seeking their first World Series title. The Royals were completing one of the most successful decades by any expansion team, with six division titles and two pennants from 1976 to 1985. This was the first World Series in which all games were played at night. Also, this was the first World Series to feature television commentator Tim McCarver, who called the games for ABC with Al Michaels and Jim Palmer. (Howard Cosell was originally scheduled to be in the booth with Michaels and Palmer, but was removed from his assignment just prior to Game 1 because of the controversy surrounding his book I Never Played the Game.) McCarver would go on to call a record 24 World Series telecasts for various networks.

This was the second Missouri-only World Series, with the first being the 1944 World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the St. Louis Browns (the Browns later moving and becoming the Baltimore Orioles). The 1985 World Series marked the 5th time in World Series history that a team came back from a three games to one deficit to win a championship. Bret Saberhagen's victories in Games 3 and 7, with him allowing only a single run on both starts, earned him the World Series Most Valuable Player award.

This was the last World Series in which the designated hitter was not used in an American League baseball park. From 1976 to 1985, in even-numbered years, the DH would be used in all games. In odd-numbered years, like this World Series, the pitchers from both were required to bat for themselves throughout the series. Beginning with the next World Series, the DH rule would be used only in games played at the American League representative's park. The Royals became World Series champions for the first time in their history; they would return to the Series in 2014, in which they played the 2014 World Series against the San Francisco Giants but lost in seven games. A year later in the 2015 World Series, the Royals would win their 2nd title against the New York Mets.

AL Kansas City Royals (4) vs. NL St. Louis Cardinals (3)

1988 Kansas City Royals season

The 1988 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Royals finishing 3rd in the American League West with a record of 84 wins and 77 losses.

Bob James (baseball)

Robert Harvey James (born August 15, 1958 in Glendale, California), is a former professional baseball player who pitched in the major leagues primarily as a relief pitcher from 1978-1987.

James was the first round draft pick in 1976 by the Montreal Expos, and joined the major league team in 1978 when he was just twenty years old. On December 7, 1984, James was traded to the Chicago White Sox for Vance Law. The following season, he saved 32 games for the White Sox, second in the American League behind only Dan Quisenberry. James pitched two more years for the White Sox before being released.

Bob Tewksbury

Robert Alan Tewksbury (born November 30, 1960) is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher and current Mental Skills Coordinator for the Chicago Cubs. He played professionally for the New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, Texas Rangers, San Diego Padres and the Minnesota Twins.

Bob Tewksbury has the lowest ratio of base on balls per innings pitched for any starting pitcher to pitch in the major leagues since the 1920s, and the lowest ratio for any pitcher to pitch since the 1800s except for Deacon Phillippe, Babe Adams, Dan Quisenberry, and Addie Joss.

Kansas City Royals award winners and league leaders

This is a list of award winners and league leaders for the Kansas City Royals professional baseball team.

List of Major League Baseball annual saves leaders

The following is a list of annual leaders in saves in Major League Baseball (MLB), with separate lists for the American League and the National League. The list also includes several professional leagues and associations that were never part of MLB.

In baseball, a save is credited to a pitcher who finishes a game for the winning team under prescribed circumstances. Most commonly a relief pitcher ("reliever") earns a save by entering in the ninth inning of a game in which his team is winning by three or fewer runs and finishing the game by pitching one inning without losing the lead. The statistic was created by Jerome Holtzman in 1959 to "measure the effectiveness of relief pitchers" and was adopted as an MLB official statistic in 1969. The save has been retroactively measured for pitchers before that date.

MLB recognizes the player or players in each league with the most saves each season. In retrospect, the five saves by Jack Manning meant he led the National League in its inaugural year, while Bill Hoffer was the American League's first saves champion with three. Mordecai Brown was the first pitcher to record at least 10 saves in a season. Dan Quisenberry, Bruce Sutter, Firpo Marberry, and Ed Walsh are the only pitchers to lead the league in saves five times (though Marberry and Walsh did so before 1969). Sutter is also tied with Harry Wright, Dan Quisenberry and Craig Kimbrel for the most consecutive seasons leading the league in saves with four.

List of Major League Baseball players (Q)

The following is a list of Major League Baseball players, retired or active. As of the end of the 2011 season, there have been 45 players with a last name that begins with Q who have been on a major league roster at some point.

Rolaids Relief Man Award

The Rolaids Relief Man Award was an annual Major League Baseball (MLB) award given from 1976 to 2012 to the top relief pitchers of the regular season, one in the American League (AL) and one in the National League (NL). Relief pitchers are the pitchers who enter the game after the starting pitcher is removed. The award was sponsored by Rolaids, whose slogan was "R-O-L-A-I-D-S spells relief." Because the first closers were nicknamed "firemen", a reference to "putting out the fire" of another team's rally, the trophy was a gold-plated firefighter's helmet. Unlike other awards, such as the Cy Young Award or the MLB Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award, the Relief Man was based on statistical performance, rather than votes. Each save was worth three points; each win was worth two points; and each loss was worth negative two points. Beginning with the 1987 MLB season, negative two points were given for blown saves. In the 2000 MLB season, the term "tough save", which was worth an additional point, was introduced by Rolaids. A "tough save" happened when a relief pitcher entered the game already having the potential tying run on base, and got the save. The player with the highest point total won the award.The inaugural award winners were Bill Campbell (AL) and Rawly Eastwick (NL); Campbell also won in the following season. Dan Quisenberry and Mariano Rivera each won the AL award five times, while Rollie Fingers and Bruce Sutter won the award four times each. Lee Smith won the award on three occasions; Campbell, Dennis Eckersley, Dave Righetti, John Franco, Éric Gagné, Randy Myers, Trevor Hoffman, Francisco Rodríguez, Heath Bell, and José Valverde each won the award twice. Sutter (NL 1979), Fingers (AL 1981), Steve Bedrosian (NL 1987), Mark Davis (NL 1989), Eckersley (AL 1992), and Éric Gagné (NL 2003) won the Relief Man and the Cy Young Award in the same season; Fingers and Eckersley won the AL MVP as well, in 1981 and 1992 respectively. Todd Worrell won both the Relief Man and the MLB Rookie of the Year Award in the 1986 MLB season. Rivera and Joe Nathan were the only relief pitchers to have tied in points for the award, and both were awarded in 2009. Goose Gossage, Fingers, Eckersley, Hoffman, Rivera, Smith, John Smoltz and Sutter were elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame. Craig Kimbrel (NL) and Jim Johnson (AL) were the final award winners in 2012. Sanofi acquired Rolaids from Johnson & Johnson unit McNeil Consumer Healthcare in 2013, but the award was not continued as a part of its marketing strategy.

Sporting News Reliever of the Year Award

The Sporting News Reliever of the Year Award was an annual award presented to the best relief pitcher in each league in Major League Baseball (MLB). It was established in 1960 by The Sporting News (TSN) as the Fireman of the Year Award. At the time, no reliever had ever received a Cy Young Award vote. The Fireman of the Year Award originally recognized the reliever with the most combined saves and wins in each league in MLB. The magazine had started publishing the then-unofficial save statistic that same year. Later, a save was worth two points compared to one for a save in determining the winner. In 2001 the award was chosen based on consensus from TSN editors, and it was renamed to Reliever of the Year Award. The award was last issued in 2010 before being discontinued.

Submarine (baseball)

In baseball, a submarine pitch is one in which the ball is released often just above the ground, but not underhanded, with the torso bent at a right angle and shoulders tilted so severely that they rotate around a nearly horizontal axis. This is in stark contrast to an underhand pitch in softball in which the torso remains upright, the shoulders are level, and the hips do not rotate.

The "upside down" release of the submariner causes balls to move differently from pitches generated by other arm slots. Gravity plays a significant role, for the submariner's ball must be thrown considerably above the strike zone, after which it drops rapidly back through. The sinking motion of the submariner's fastball is enhanced by forward rotation, in contradistinction to the overhand pitcher's hopping backspin.

Submarine pitches are often the toughest for same-side batters to hit (i.e., a right-handed submarine pitcher is the more difficult for a right-handed batter to hit, and likewise for left-handed pitchers and batters). This is because the submariner's spin is not perfectly level; the ball rotates forward and toward the pitching arm side, jamming same-sided hitters at the last moment, even as the ball drops rapidly through the zone.The rarity of submarine pitchers is almost certainly attributable to its unusual technique. It is not typically a natural style of throwing—it is often a learned style—and because the vast majority of pitchers use an overarm motion, most young pitchers are encouraged to throw overhand.

Though the bending motion required to pitch effectively as a submariner means that submariners may be more at risk of developing back problems, it is commonly thought that the submarine motion is less injurious to the elbow and shoulder. Kent Tekulve and Gene Garber are among the most durable pitchers in baseball history with 1,944 appearances between the two.

Past major league submariners include Carl Mays (whose unorthodox delivery possibly contributed to the fatal beaning of Ray Chapman), Ted Abernathy, Elden Auker, Chad Bradford, Mark Eichhorn, Gene Garber, Kent Tekulve, Todd Frohwirth, and Dan Quisenberry. Steve Olin was also a submarine pitcher.

Shunsuke Watanabe of the Lancaster Barnstormers is known as "Mr. Submarine" in Japan. Watanabe has an even lower release point than the typical submarine pitcher, dropping his pivot knee so low that it scrapes the ground. He now wears a pad under his uniform to avoid injuring his knee. His release is so low that his knuckles often become raw from their periodic drag on the ground.

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