Dan Grimm

Daniel Jay Grimm (February 7, 1941 – May 3, 2018) was an American football offensive lineman in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers, Atlanta Falcons, Baltimore Colts, and the Washington Redskins. He played college football at the University of Colorado and was drafted in the fifth round of the 1963 NFL Draft. Grimm was also selected in the 20th round of the 1963 AFL Draft by the Denver Broncos.

Dan Grimm
No. 67
Born:February 7, 1941
Perry, Iowa
Died:May 3, 2018 (aged 77)
Lincoln County, North Carolina
Career information
Position(s)Center
Guard
CollegeColorado
AFL draft1963 / Round: 20 / Pick: 157
(By the Denver Broncos)
NFL draft1963 / Round: 5 / Pick: 70
Career history
As player
1963–1965Green Bay Packers
1966–1968Atlanta Falcons
1969Baltimore Colts
1969Washington Redskins
Career stats
1963 American Football League draft

The 1963 American Football League draft was held in Dallas on Saturday, December 1, 1962.The Kansas City Chiefs drafted as the Dallas Texans, as their relocation would take place a few months later. With the first overall selection, they took Buck Buchanan, a defensive tackle from Grambling in Louisiana. The NFL draft was held two days later in Chicago.

1963 Green Bay Packers season

The 1963 Green Bay Packers season was their 45th season overall and their 43rd season in the National Football League. The two-time defending NFL champions posted an 11–2–1 record under fifth-year head coach Vince Lombardi for a second-place finish in the Western Conference, a half game back.

Both losses were inflicted by the Chicago Bears (11–1–2), the NFL champions in 1963, as the indefinite suspension of halfback Paul Hornung was too much for Green Bay to overcome. The Packers had won the previous five regular season games with rival Chicago, but scored just ten points total in the two games in 1963, and needed only a tie in one of them to advance to the championship game. (The tie at Detroit on Thanksgiving did not impact the Packers' title chances; ties were omitted from the winning percentage calculation until 1972.) Chicago's only loss was at last place San Francisco in October and they tied Pittsburgh and Minnesota in consecutive weeks after their second defeat of the Packers.

Quarterback Bart Starr suffered a hairline fracture in his passing hand at St. Louis on October 20. Up 23–0 in the third quarter, Starr couldn't find an open receiver on third down and took off on a run that gained 15 yards, tackled with a late hit out of bounds by Cardinal cornerback Jimmy "Iron Claw" Hill, who was ejected. Second-string quarterback John Roach filled in for the rest of the game, a 30–7 win in 85 °F (30 °C) heat, and the next four starts. Zeke Bratkowski was acquired in late October, waived by the Rams, and saw some action, too. Starr returned a month later, in week eleven on November 24 against San Francisco in Milwaukee, a week after the second loss to Chicago.Following their regular season finale, a 21–17 win at San Francisco on Saturday, Green Bay needed Detroit to defeat the Bears at Wrigley Field on Sunday. The game's progress was updated to the Packers during their flight home; Chicago's 24–14 win ended Green Bay's bid for an unprecedented third consecutive championship game win, which came four years later in 1967.

In the third place Playoff Bowl in Miami three weeks later on January 5, the Packers overwhelmed the Cleveland Browns, 40–23. Green Bay led 28–10 at halftime and extended it to 38–10 in the fourth quarter.This was the eleventh and final season for hall of fame center Jim Ringo as a Packer. In May 1964, he and reserve fullback Earl Gros were traded to the Philadelphia Eagles for linebacker Lee Roy Caffey and a first round draft choice. Ringo played four years with the Eagles and then went into coaching; the draft pick was used to select halfback Donny Anderson as a "future" pick in the 1965 NFL Draft.

Hall of fame halfback Hornung did not play this season, suspended in April by commissioner Pete Rozelle for betting on NFL games and associating with undesirable persons.

1963 NFL Draft

The 1963 National Football League draft was held at the Sheraton Hotel in Chicago, Illinois, on Monday, December 3, 1962.The first overall selection was quarterback Terry Baker of Oregon State, the Heisman Trophy winner, taken by the Los Angeles Rams. The AFL draft was held two days earlier in Dallas.

1964 Green Bay Packers season

The 1964 Green Bay Packers season was their 46th season overall and their 44th season in the National Football League. The club was led by sixth-year head coach Vince Lombardi, and tied for second place in the Western Conference at 8–5–1.

The Packers opened the season in Green Bay with a promising win over the rival Chicago Bears, the defending NFL champions. They then lost four of six, including three home games, and were 3–4 midway through the season, falling twice to the Baltimore Colts. The first three losses were by a total of five points, but the fourth on October 25, to the Los Angeles Rams in Milwaukee, was by ten and came after building a 17–0 lead.In the season's latter half, Green Bay won five of six and tied the Rams in the finale to end 3½ games behind the Colts (12–2) in the West, tied for second with Minnesota. Baltimore clinched the Western title on November 22, with three games remaining. Based on point differential in the season split with the Vikings, the Packers were awarded the runner-up slot in the Playoff Bowl, the consolation third place game in Miami played three weeks after the regular season, on January 3.

Green Bay had played in the previous season's Playoff Bowl and won decisively, which followed consecutive league titles in 1961 and 1962, and three straight appearances in the championship game. In the 1964 season's third-place game, the St. Louis Cardinals prevailed over the unmotivated Packers, 24–17.The 1964 season was arguably the most disappointing for Lombardi as a head coach. Consecutive appearances in the consolation Playoff Bowl, and the loss, keyed Lombardi and the Packers to win three consecutive NFL titles; the latter two followed by victories in the first two Super Bowls. Since the playoff era began 86 years ago in 1933, no other team was won three straight NFL titles.

Hall of Fame right guard Jerry Kramer missed most of the season due to an intestinal condition. After multiple surgeries, it was rectified in May 1965 after sizable wood fragments from a teenage accident a dozen years earlier were removed.

The NFL classifies the ten editions of the Playoff Bowl as exhibition games, not postseason contests.

1965 Green Bay Packers season

The 1965 Green Bay Packers season was their 47th season overall and their 45th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 10–3–1 record under seventh-year head coach Vince Lombardi, earning a tie for first place in the Western Conference with the Baltimore Colts.

In the final regular season game at Kezar Stadium in San Francisco, a late touchdown by the 49ers caused a tie and dropped Green Bay into a tie with the Colts. Although the Packers defeated Baltimore twice during the regular season, the rules at the time required a tiebreaker playoff, played in Green Bay on December 26. With backup quarterbacks playing for both teams, the Packers tied the Colts late and won in overtime, 13–10.Green Bay then met the defending champion Cleveland Browns (11–3) in the NFL championship game, also at Green Bay. The Packers won, 23–12, for their ninth NFL title and third under Lombardi. It was the last NFL championship game before the advent of the Super Bowl and the first of three consecutive league titles for Green Bay.

Known as "New City Stadium" for its first eight seasons, the Packers' venue in Green Bay was renamed Lambeau Field in August 1965 in memory of Packers founder, player, and long-time head coach, Curly Lambeau, who had died two months earlier.

1966 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1966 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's inaugural season in the National Football League (NFL). The Falcons finished in seventh place in the NFL Eastern Conference with a record of 3–11, ahead of only the New York Giants.

1966 NFL expansion draft

The 1966 NFL expansion draft was a National Football League (NFL) draft in which a new expansion team, named the Atlanta Falcons, selected its first players. On June 30, 1965, NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle awarded the first NFL franchise in the Deep South to the city of Atlanta and granted ownership to Rankin Smith Sr.So that the Falcons could become competitive with existing teams, the league awarded the Falcons the first pick in the 1966 NFL Draft, supplemented with the final pick in the first five rounds. The NFL also gave the new team the opportunity to select current players from existing teams. That selection was provided by the expansion draft, held on February 15, 1966. In this draft, held six weeks after the regular draft, the existing franchises listed players from which the Falcons could select to switch to the new team.

Each of the 14 established teams froze 29 players on their 40-man rosters that opened the 1965 season (That made 154 players available.). Atlanta picked one of the 11 and then each team froze two more. Atlanta was able to select two more for a total of 42 players chosen. The Falcons paid $8.5 million for the franchise. (Feb 17, 1966 St. Petersburg Times.)

1968 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1968 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's third year in the National Football League (NFL).

2018 in the United States

This is a list of events in the year 2018 in the United States.

Colorado Buffaloes football

The Colorado Buffaloes football program represents the University of Colorado Boulder in college football at the NCAA Division I FBS level. The team is currently a member of the Pac-12 Conference, having previously been a charter member of the Big 12 Conference. Before joining the Big 12, they were members of the Big Eight Conference. The CU football team has played at Folsom Field since 1924. The Buffs all-time record is 694–493–36 (.583 winning percentage) prior to the Valero Alamo Bowl at the end of the 2016 season. Colorado won a National Championship in 1990. The football program is 23rd on the all-time win list and 30th in all-time winning percentage.

Deaths in May 2018

The following is a list of notable deaths in May 2018.

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

Name, age, country of citizenship at birth, subsequent country of citizenship (if applicable), reason for notability, cause of death (if known), and reference.

Green Bay Packers draft history

This page is a list of the Green Bay Packers NFL Draft selections. The Packers have participated in every NFL draft since it began in 1936, in which they made Russ Letlow their first-ever selection.

List of Colorado Buffaloes in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Colorado Buffaloes football players in the NFL Draft.

List of Washington Redskins players

This is a list of American football players who have played for the Washington Redskins, as well as its predecessors the Boston Braves (1932) and Boston Redskins (1933–1936), in the National Football League (NFL). It includes players that have played at least five games in the NFL regular season. The Washington Redskins franchise was founded in Boston, Massachusetts as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The name was changed the next year to the Redskins. In 1937, the franchise moved to Washington, D.C.The Redskins have played over 1,000 games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.Overall, the Redskins have had a total of 23 players and coaches (17 primary, six minor) inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Many Redskins players have also had successful college football careers, including six who were Heisman Trophy winners: Gary Beban, Desmond Howard, Vic Janowicz, George Rogers, Danny Wuerffel, and Robert Griffin III. In addition, the Heisman Trophy sculpture was modeled after Ed Smith in 1934, who became a Redskins player in 1936.Several former players have become head coach of the Redskins, including Turk Edwards, Dick Todd, and Jack Pardee. In addition, former players have become assistant coaches, such as Earnest Byner, Russ Grimm, Greg Manusky, and Keenan McCardell. Other players have also become successful in non-sport activities, like acting (Terry Crews and Jamal Duff) and politics (Tom Osborne and Heath Shuler).Players on the Redskins have also been related from time to time. In 1957, Redskins end Joe Walton became the first son of an NFL player to play in the league. His father, Frank Walton also played on the Redskins. Joe Krakoski and his son, also named Joe Krakoski, also both played for the Redskins. In addition, four sets of brothers have played with each other while on the Redskins: Chris and Nic Clemons, Cecil and Ray Hare, Ed and Robert Khayat, and Dan and Matt Turk.

List of people from Iowa

This is a list of notable people who were born in or closely associated with the American state of Iowa. People not born in Iowa are marked with §.

Neal Casal

Neal Casal (born November 2, 1968, Denville, New Jersey) is an American guitarist, singer, songwriter, and photographer. First rising to prominence as lead guitar with Rickey Medlocke's Blackfoot from 1988-1993, Casal is best known as a member of Ryan Adams' backing band the Cardinals from 2005 until 2009, with whom he recorded three studio albums. He currently plays in several groups, including the Chris Robinson Brotherhood, Hard Working Americans, The Skiffle Players and Circles Around the Sun – and has released twelve albums as a solo artist.

In 2010, Casal released a photo-book, Ryan Adams & the Cardinals: A View of Other Windows, documenting his time spent within the band. He released his most recent solo album, Sweeten the Distance, in 2011.

Perry, Iowa

Perry is a city in Dallas County, Iowa, United States, along the North Raccoon River. The population was 7,702 at the 2010 Census. It is part of the Des Moines–West Des Moines Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Formerly a major railroad junction, Perry is home to the Historic Hotel Pattee, with themed rooms including many related to the railroad.

Political party strength in Washington (state)

Washington ratified its constitution and held its first state elections in 1889, the year it was admitted to the union as a state. It established the positions of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Attorney General, State Treasurer, State Auditor, Commissioner of Public Lands, and Superintendent of Public Instruction. The position of Insurance Commissioner was legislatively established in 1907. All positions are elected to four-year terms, concurrent with presidential elections. Washington is one of three states that elects nine separate statewide officials, while six others elect ten.

The table also indicates the historical party composition in the State Senate, State House of Representatives, State delegation to the U.S. Senate, and State delegation to the U.S. House of Representatives. State senators are elected to four-year terms, with half elected every two years. State representatives are elected to two-year terms, and two from each of 49 legislative districts in separate elections.

While the U.S. state of Washington is considered a solidly Democratic state, it mainly elected Republican candidates during its first forty years of statehood. It currently holds the longest streak of Democratic governors in the nation, having last elected a Republican to the top executive office in 1980. Despite that, Republicans have held the Secretary of State since 1965. The office of auditor however has been held continuously by Democrats since 1933, when the national wave for President Franklin Roosevelt swept the party into every statewide race and congressional district except the uncontested superintendent of public education. That position was made non-partisan in 1940. At the presidential level, Washington is part of the "blue wall", having voted for all Democratic nominees since 1988.

Prior to statehood, the President of the United States appointed a territorial governor and secretary of state, who served as acting governor when the governor was absent from the state. The position of attorney general was established in 1887, and only one person held office before statehood. A non-voting delegate was elected to the House of Representatives.

The nine members of the Washington Supreme Court are also elected statewide to six-year terms but on a non-partisan basis and are not listed here. However all members of the court are considered liberal-leaning, matching the state's overall electorate.Voters do not register as members of political parties.

The tables below show the history of officeholders elected to statewide executive offices, the state legislature, and the U.S. Congress, as well as the winners of the state's electoral college votes.

For years in which a presidential election was held, the table indicates which party's nominees received the state's electoral votes.

Key to parties: Democratic (D), Nonpartisan (NP), Populist (P), Republican (R), a tie or coalition within a group of elected officials.

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