Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award

The Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award is a lifetime honor presented annually by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA) to no more than one living writer of fantasy or science fiction. It was inaugurated in 1975 when Robert Heinlein was made the first SFWA Grand Master and it was renamed in 2002 after the Association's founder, Damon Knight, who had died that year.[1][2]

The presentation is made at the annual SFWA Nebula Awards banquet, commonly during May, but it is not one of the Nebulas—which recognize the preceding calendar year's best works of SF and fantasy, selected by vote of all Association members. SFWA officers and past presidents alone submit Grand Master nominations and the final selection must be approved by a majority of that group.[1] The recipient is announced in advance, commonly during the preceding calendar year, which is the publication year and official award year for the Nebulas.

Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award
Awarded forExcellence in science fiction and fantasy writing, literary achievements
CountryUnited States
Presented byScience Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America
First awarded1974
Websitesfwa.org

History

The Grand Master Award was originally limited to six per decade[3] and six were presented in the ten years to 1984; twelve in the twenty years to 1994. All were 67 years old (Isaac Asimov) to 75 years old (Lester del Rey) at the time of presentation; Alfred Bester had died at 74. Andre Norton was the first woman so honored, and only five others have been selected since. Anne McCaffrey was the first recipient named after the award had been renamed the "Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master" in 2003. From 1995 the award has been conferred annually with exceptions only in 2002 and 2011 (2001 and 2010 Nebula award years).[1] Joe Haldeman and Connie Willis were the youngest to receive the honor, age 66.

Starting in 1995, the SFWA also awarded the title of Author Emeritus "as a way to recognize and appreciate senior writers in the genres of science fiction and fantasy who have made significant contributions to our field but who are no longer active or whose excellent work may no longer be as widely known as it once was." No more than one Author Emeritus was named each year, and the recipient was invited to speak at the annual Nebula Awards banquet.[4] Fourteen were named in the 16 years to 2010[4] (the 2009 Nebula award year), none of whom had been named Grand Master—as remains true through 2013/2014. Its status as a consolation prize was one matter of controversy[5] and by October 2013 the Author Emeritus webpage had been removed by SFWA.[6]

Grand Masters

A total of 34 SFWA Grand Masters have been created in 44 years from 1974/1975 to 2017/2018.[1][2] Please note: The list below shows the year of the award ceremonies for each respective recipient, but the actual title of each individual award uses the preceding year.

Recognition

There have been three anthologies honoring recipients of the Grand Master Award and collecting some of their short works: The SFWA Grand Masters, Volume 1 (1999), The SFWA Grand Masters, Volume 2 (2000), and The SFWA Grand Masters, Volume 3 (2001), all edited by Frederik Pohl. Collectively, they honor the first fifteen recipients of the award.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master" Archived 2013-03-08 at the Wayback Machine. Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA). Retrieved 2013-04-01.
  2. ^ a b "SFWA Grand Master Award" Archived 2011-08-05 at the Wayback Machine. The Locus Index to SF Awards: About the Awards. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-04-01.
  3. ^ Harlan Ellison (1994), Harlan Ellison's Watching 36, retrieved 2017-08-24
  4. ^ a b "SFWA Author Emeritus". SFWA. Archived 2013-04-09. Retrieved 2013-12-06.
  5. ^ "Other SFWA Awards" Archived October 16, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The Locus Index to SF Awards: About the Awards. Locus Publications. Retrieved 2013-04-01.
  6. ^ "SFWA Author Emeritus" (unavailable). SFWA. Archived 2013-10-12. Retrieved 2013-12-06.
  7. ^ "2005 Nebula Award winners". Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Inc. May 6, 2006. Archived from the original on July 5, 2008.
  8. ^ Nawotka, Edward (April 24, 2008). "Nebula Awards puts Austin and Texas writers at center of science fiction world". Dallas Morning News. Archived from the original on April 29, 2008.
  9. ^ "Michael Moorcock named SFWA Grand Master". Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America Inc. February 28, 2008. Archived from the original on April 2, 2008.
  10. ^ "Nebula Awards 2009". Cover It Live. April 25, 2009. Retrieved 2009-04-25.
  11. ^ "SWFA live". Twitter. 2009-04-25. Retrieved 2009-04-25.
  12. ^ "Joe Haldeman named Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master". SFWA. December 15, 2009. Retrieved 2013-12-06.
  13. ^ "SFWA names Connie Willis recipient of the 2011 Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award". SFWA. January 16, 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-06.
  14. ^ 2012 Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master awarded to Gene Wolfe". SFWA. December 13, 2012. Retrieved 2013-12-06.
  15. ^ Alison Flood (December 14, 2012). "Gene Wolfe wins grand master award for science fiction and fantasy". The Guardian. Retrieved 2012-12-14.
  16. ^ "2013 Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award: Samuel R. Delany". SFWA. December 4, 2013. Retrieved 2013-12-06.
  17. ^ "2015 Larry Niven Named SFWA Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master". SFWA. March 2, 2015. Retrieved 2015-04-16.
  18. ^ "C.J. Cherryh Named SFWA Damon Knight Grand Master". SFWA. February 17, 2016. Retrieved February 18, 2016.
  19. ^ "SFWA Announces Newest Damon Knight Grand Master – Jane Yolen". SFWA. November 29, 2016. Retrieved November 29, 2016.
  20. ^ "SFWA Announces Newest Grand Master – Peter S. Beagle". SFWA. January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  21. ^ "Beagle Named SFWA Grand Master". Locus Magazine. January 23, 2018. Retrieved January 23, 2018.
  22. ^ "Gibson Named SFWA Grand Master". Locus Magazine. January 8, 2019. Retrieved January 8, 2019.

External links

2012 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 2012.

Connie Willis

Constance Elaine Trimmer Willis (born December 31, 1945), commonly known as Connie Willis, is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. She has won eleven Hugo Awards and seven Nebula Awards for particular works—more major awards than any other writer—most recently the "Best Novel" Hugo and Nebula Awards for Blackout/All Clear (2010). She was inducted by the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2009 and the Science Fiction Writers of America named her its 28th SFWA Grand Master in 2011.Several of her works feature time travel by history students at a faculty of the future University of Oxford—sometimes called the Time Travel series. They are the short story "Fire Watch" (1982, also in several anthologies and the 1985 collection of the same name), the novels Doomsday Book and To Say Nothing of the Dog (1992 and 1997), as well as the two-part novel Blackout/All Clear (2010). All four won the annual Hugo Award but Doomsday Book and Blackout/All Clear won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards.

Damon Knight

Damon Francis Knight (September 19, 1922 – April 15, 2002) was an American science fiction author, editor and critic. He is the author of "To Serve Man", a 1950 short story adapted for The Twilight Zone. He was married to fellow writer Kate Wilhelm.

Frederik Pohl

Frederik George Pohl Jr. (; November 26, 1919 – September 2, 2013) was an American science-fiction writer, editor, and fan, with a career spanning more than 75 years—from his first published work, the 1937 poem "Elegy to a Dead Satellite: Luna", to the 2011 novel All the Lives He Led and articles and essays published in 2012.From about 1959 until 1969, Pohl edited Galaxy and its sister magazine If; the latter won three successive annual Hugo Awards as the year's best professional magazine. His 1977 novel Gateway won four "year's best novel" awards: the Hugo voted by convention participants, the Locus voted by magazine subscribers, the Nebula voted by American science-fiction writers, and the juried academic John W. Campbell Memorial Award. He won the Campbell Memorial Award again for the 1984 collection of novellas Years of the City, one of two repeat winners during the first 40 years. For his 1979 novel Jem, Pohl won a U.S. National Book Award in the one-year category Science Fiction. It was a finalist for three other year's best novel awards. He won four Hugo and three Nebula Awards.The Science Fiction Writers of America named Pohl its 12th recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award in 1993 and he was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 1998, its third class of two dead and two living writers.Pohl won the Hugo Award for Best Fan Writer in 2010, for his blog, "The Way the Future Blogs".

Gene Wolfe

Gene Rodman Wolfe (born May 7, 1931) is an American science fiction and fantasy writer. He is noted for his dense, allusive prose as well as the strong influence of his Catholic faith. He is a prolific short-story writer and novelist and has won many science fiction and fantasy literary awards.Wolfe is most famous for The Book of the New Sun (four volumes, 1980–83), the first part of his Solar Cycle.

In 1998, Locus magazine ranked it third-best fantasy novel before 1990 (after The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit) based on a poll of subscribers that considered it and several other series as single entries.

James E. Gunn (writer)

James Edwin Gunn (born July 12, 1923) is an American science fiction writer, editor, scholar, and anthologist. His work as an editor of anthologies includes the six-volume Road to Science Fiction series. He won the Hugo Award for "Best Related Work" in 1983 and he has won or been nominated for several other awards for his non-fiction works in the field of science fiction studies. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America made him its 24th Grand Master in 2007 and he was inducted by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Hall of Fame in 2015. His novel The Immortals was adapted into a 1969-71 TV series starring Christopher George.Gunn is a professor emeritus of English, and the founding director of the Center for the Study of Science Fiction, both at the University of Kansas.

Jane Yolen

Jane Hyatt Yolen (born February 11, 1939) is an American writer of fantasy, science fiction, and children's books. She is the author or editor of more than 365 books, of which the best known is The Devil's Arithmetic, a Holocaust novella. Her other works include the Nebula Award-winning short story Sister Emily's Lightship, the novelette Lost Girls, Owl Moon, The Emperor and the Kite, the Commander Toad series and How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight. She gave the lecture for the 1989 Alice G. Smith Lecture, the inaugural year for the series. This lecture series is held at the University of South Florida School of Information "to honor the memory of its first director, Alice Gullen Smith, known for her work with youth and bibliotherapy." In 2012 she became the first woman to give the Andrew Lang lecture.

Joe Haldeman

Joe William Haldeman (born June 9, 1943) is an American science fiction author. He is best known for his novel The Forever War (1974). That novel, and other of his works, including The Hemingway Hoax (1991) and Forever Peace (1997), have won major science fiction awards, including the Hugo Award and Nebula Award.He was awarded the SFWA Grand Master for career achievements. In 2012 he was inducted as a member of the Science Fiction Hall of Fame.Many of Haldeman's works, including his debut novel War Year and his second novel The Forever War, were inspired by his experiences related to serving in the Vietnam War. Wounded in combat, he struggled to adjust to civilian life after returning home.

Larry Niven

Laurence van Cott Niven (; born April 30, 1938) is an American science fiction writer. His best-known work is Ringworld (1970), which received Hugo, Locus, Ditmar, and Nebula awards. The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America named him the 2015 recipient of the Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master Award. His work is primarily hard science fiction, using big science concepts and theoretical physics. It also often includes elements of detective fiction and adventure stories. His fantasy includes the series The Magic Goes Away, rational fantasy dealing with magic as a non-renewable resource.

List of science fiction and fantasy literary awards

This is a list of science fiction and fantasy awards for literature.

Nebula Award

The Nebula Awards annually recognize the best works of science fiction or fantasy published in the United States. The awards are organized and awarded by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), a nonprofit association of professional science fiction and fantasy writers. They were first given in 1966 at a ceremony created for the awards, and are given in four categories for different lengths of literary works. A fifth category for film and television episode scripts was given 1974–78 and 2000–09, and a sixth category for video game writing was begun in 2018. The rules governing the Nebula Awards have changed several times during the awards' history, most recently in 2010. The SFWA Nebula Conference, at which the awards are announced and presented, is held each spring in the United States. Locations vary from year to year.

The Nebula Awards are one of the best known and most prestigious science fiction and fantasy awards and have been called "the most important of the American science fiction awards". Winning works have been published in special collections, and winners and nominees are often noted as such on the books' cover. SFWA identifies the awards by the year of publication, that is, the year prior to the year in which the award is given.

For lists of winners and nominees for each Nebula category, see the list of categories below.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2013

Nebula Awards Showcase 2013 is an anthology of science fiction short works edited by Catherine Asaro. It was first published in trade paperback by Pyr in May 2013.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2014

Nebula Awards Showcase 2014 is an anthology of science fiction short works edited by Kij Johnson. It was first published in trade paperback by Pyr in May 2014.

Nebula Awards Showcase 2017

Nebula Awards Showcase 2017 is an anthology of science fiction and fantasy short works edited by Canadian writer Julie E. Czerneda. It was first published in trade paperback and ebook by Pyr in May 2017.

Outline of science fiction

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to science fiction:

Science fiction – a genre of fiction dealing with the impact of imagined innovations in science or technology, often in a futuristic setting. or depicting space exploration. Exploring the consequences of such innovations is the traditional purpose of science fiction, making it a "literature of ideas".

Peter S. Beagle

Peter Soyer Beagle (born April 20, 1939) is an American novelist and screenwriter, especially fantasy fiction. His best-known work is The Last Unicorn (1968), a fantasy novel he wrote in his twenties, which Locus subscribers voted the number five "All-Time Best Fantasy Novel" in 1987. During the last twenty-five years he has won several literary awards, including a World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2011. He was named Damon Knight Memorial Grand Master by SFWA in 2018.

Robert A. Heinlein bibliography

The science fiction writer Robert A. Heinlein (1907–1988) was productive during a writing career that spanned the last 49 years of his life; the Robert A. Heinlein bibliography includes 32 novels, 59 short stories and 16 collections published during his life. Four films, two TV series, several episodes of a radio series, and a board game derive more or less directly from his work. He wrote a screenplay for one of the films. Heinlein edited an anthology of other writers' SF short stories.

Three non-fiction books and two poems have been published posthumously. One novel has been published posthumously and another, an unusual collaboration, was published in 2006. Four collections have been published posthumously.

Heinlein's fictional works can be found in the library under PS3515.E288, or under Dewey 813.54. Known pseudonyms include Anson MacDonald (7 times), Lyle Monroe (7), John Riverside (1), Caleb Saunders (1), and Simon York (1). All the works originally attributed to MacDonald, Saunders, Riverside and York, and many of the works originally attributed to Lyle Monroe, were later reissued in various Heinlein collections and attributed to Heinlein.

Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America

Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America, or SFWA ( or ) is a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization of professional science fiction and fantasy writers. While SFWA is based in the United States, its membership is open to writers worldwide. The organization was founded in 1965 by Damon Knight under the name Science Fiction Writers of America, Inc. The president of SFWA as of 2015 is Cat Rambo.

SFWA has about 1,900 professionally published writer members worldwide.SFWA Active members vote for the Nebula Awards, one of the principal English-language science fiction awards.

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