Damloup

Damloup is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Damloup
Location of Damloup
Damloup is located in France
Damloup
Damloup
Damloup is located in Grand Est
Damloup
Damloup
Coordinates: 49°12′08″N 5°29′31″E / 49.2022°N 5.4919°ECoordinates: 49°12′08″N 5°29′31″E / 49.2022°N 5.4919°E
CountryFrance
RegionGrand Est
DepartmentMeuse
ArrondissementVerdun
CantonBelleville-sur-Meuse
IntercommunalityCommunauté de communes du pays d'Étain
Government
 • Mayor (2008–2014) Jean-Paul Colin
Area
1
5.28 km2 (2.04 sq mi)
Population
 (2016-01-01)[1]
142
 • Density27/km2 (70/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+01:00 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+02:00 (CEST)
INSEE/Postal code
55143 /55400
Elevation220–357 m (722–1,171 ft)
(avg. 230 m or 750 ft)
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

See also

  1. ^ "Populations légales 2016". INSEE. Retrieved 25 April 2019.
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Delouze-Rosières

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Douaumont-Vaux

Douaumont-Vaux is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. It was established on 1 January 2019 by merger of the former communes of Vaux-devant-Damloup (the seat) and Douaumont.

Fort Vaux

Fort Vaux, in Vaux-Devant-Damloup, Meuse, France was built from 1881–1884 for 1,500,000 Francs and housed a garrison of 150 men. Vaux was the second Fort to fall in the Battle of Verdun after Fort Douaumont which was captured by a small German raiding party in February 1916, in the confusion of the French retreat from the Woëvre plain. Vaux had been modernised before 1914 with reinforced concrete top protection like Fort Douaumont and was not destroyed by a German heavy artillery-fire, which had included shelling by 16-inch howitzers. The superstructure of the fort was badly damaged but the garrison, the deep interior corridors and stations remained intact, when the fort was attacked on 2 June by German assault troops.

The defence of Fort Vaux was marked by the heroism and endurance of the garrison, including Major Sylvain-Eugene Raynal. Under the command of Reynal, the besieged French garrison repulsed German assaults, including fighting underground from barricades inside the corridors, during the first big engagement inside a fort during the First World War. The last men of the French garrison gave up after running out of water (some of which was poisoned), ammunition, medical supplies and food. Raynal sent several messages by homing pigeon (including the famous Vaillant), requesting relief for his soldiers. During his last communications, Major Raynal wrote "This is my last pigeon".After the surrender of the garrison on 7 June, the German army group commander Crown Prince Wilhelm, presented Major Raynal with a French officer's sword as a sign of respect. Raynal and his soldiers remained in captivity in Germany until the Armistice of 11 November 1918. The fort was recaptured by French infantry on 2 November 1916 after an artillery bombardment involving two long-range 400 mm (16 in) railway guns. After its recapture, Fort Vaux was repaired and garrisoned. Several underground galleries to reach the far outside, one of them being 1 mi (1.6 km) long, were dug and equipped, the water reserve was quadrupled and light was provided by two electric generators. Some damage from the fighting on 2 June can still be seen. The underground installations of the fort are well-preserved and are open to the public for guided visits.

François Proth

François Proth (1852 – 1879) was a French self-taught mathematician farmer who lived in Vaux-devant-Damloup near Verdun, France.He stated four primality-related theorems. The most famous of these, Proth's theorem, can be used to test whether a Proth number (a number of the form k2n + 1 with k odd and k < 2n) is prime. The numbers passing this test are called Proth primes; they continue to be of importance in the computational search for large prime numbers.Proth also formulated Gilbreath's conjecture on successive differences of primes, 80 years prior to Gilbreath, but his proof of the conjecture turned out to be erroneous.The cause of Proth's death is not known.

Harville

Harville is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.Harville is ruled by the mighty King David and his beautiful queen Melody and entertained by the court jester the Mysterious Raja.

Louppy-le-Château

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Malancourt

Malancourt is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Manheulles

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Montfaucon-d'Argonne

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Réville-aux-Bois

Réville-aux-Bois is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Vaux-devant-Damloup

Vaux-devant-Damloup is a former commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France. It had a population of 67 (2012). On 1 January 2019, it was merged into the new commune Douaumont-Vaux.Fort Vaux is located on the territory of the commune.

It was one of the French villages destroyed during World War I, although it was rebuilt later.

Vaux-lès-Palameix

Vaux-lès-Palameix is a commune in the Meuse department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Communes of the Meuse department

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