Dalj

Dalj (Serbian Cyrillic: Даљ, Hungarian: Dálya)[1] is a village on the Danube in eastern Croatia, near the confluence of the Drava and Danube, on the border with Serbia. It is connected with the D519 highway and administratively located in the municipality of Erdut, Osijek-Baranja County. While the municipality carry the name of predominantly Croat village of Erdut, municipality's largest settlement and seat of its institutions is Dalj.

Dalj

Даљ (Serbian)[1]
Skyline of Dalj
Dalj is located in Osijek-Baranja County
Dalj
Dalj
Location of Dalj in Croatia
Dalj is located in Croatia
Dalj
Dalj
Dalj (Croatia)
Coordinates: 45°29′N 18°59′E / 45.483°N 18.983°E
Country Croatia
CountyZastava Osječko-baranjske županije.png Osijek-Baranja County
MunicipalityErdut
Government
 • BodyLocal Committee
Population
 (2011)[2]
 • Total3,937
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
31226
Area code(s)+385 31
Official languagesCroatian, Serbian[1]

History

Rodna kuća Milutina Milankovića
House in Dalj where Milutin Milanković was born

Prehistory

One Scordisci archaeological site in Dalj dating back to late La Tène culture was excavated in the 1970s and 1980s as a part of rescue excavations in eastern Croatia.[3] Archaeological site was a part of the settlement network of Scordisci in the area of Vinkovci.[3]

Croatian War of Independence

During the Croatian War of Independence, the village became the site of the Dalj massacre—killing of 39 prisoners of war in August 1991. The prisoners were captured as Croatian policemen, Croatian National Guard troops and Civil defencemen and killed after the Yugoslav People's Army and Serbian paramilitaries captured Dalj on 1 August. Goran Hadžić, Croatian Serb political leader at the time, is charged with the war crime.[4]

As of July 2013 Hadžić is on trial at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The ICTY also charged Hadžić with illegal detention of hundreds of civilians in Dalj police station and a hangar near village's railway station.[5] The detainees were beaten and otherwise physically abused.[6]

Demographics

By census 1991 in the town lived:

Education

Secondary

High School Dalj is public high school in Dalj. School offers students the following educational programs: Economist, Commercial Officer (in Serbian), Agricultural Technician and Agricultural Technician General.

Notable natives and residents

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Government of Croatia (October 2013). "Peto izvješće Republike Hrvatske o primjeni Europske povelje o regionalnim ili manjinskim jezicima" (PDF) (in Croatian). Council of Europe. p. 36. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  2. ^ "Population by Age and Sex, by Settlements, 2011 Census: Dalj". Census of Population, Households and Dwellings 2011. Zagreb: Croatian Bureau of Statistics. December 2012.
  3. ^ a b Dizdar, Marko (2016). "Late La Tène Settlements in the Vinkovci Region (Eastern Slavonia, Croatia): Centres of Trade and Exchange" (PDF). Boii - Taurisci: Proceedings of the International Seminar, Oberleis-Klement, June 14th-15th, 2012. Austrian Academy of Sciences Press: 31–48. Retrieved 22 January 2019.
  4. ^ Branimir Felger (1 August 2011). "Ni nakon 20 godina od pokolja u Dalju nitko nije stao pred lice pravde" [Even after 20 years since the Dalj massacre, nobody was tried for the crime] (in Croatian). Nova TV (Croatia).
  5. ^ "The Prosecutor of the Tribunal Against Goran Hadžić - Indictment". International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. 21 May 2004.
  6. ^ "Svjedok na suđenju Hadžiću o mučenju u Dalju: Cigaretom sam palio tetovažu da mi ne odsjeku ruku" [Witness at Hadžić Trial on Torture in Dalj: I Had to Burn off a Tattoo with a Cigarette, Otherwise They Would Cut off my Hand]. Novi list (in Croatian). 16 October 2012.
Church of St. Demetrius, Dalj

The Church of St. Demetrius (Croatian: Crkva svetog Dimitrija, Serbian Cyrillic: Црква светог Димитрија) is a Serbian Orthodox church in Dalj in eastern Croatia, and the cathedral of the Eparchy of Osječko polje and Baranja. The first church on this site was built in 1715, and the present-day church in 1799. The church of St. Demetrius is the largest cathedral of the Serbian Orthodox Church in Croatia.

Church of St. Nicholas, Jagodnjak

Church of St. Nicholas (Serbian: Crkva svetog Nikole, Serbian Cyrillic: Црква светог Николе) in Jagodnjak is Serbian Orthodox church in eastern Croatia. The church was built in 1725. Church gain attention in 2012 when local believer claimed apparation of Nectarios of Aegina in her dream. In 2013 special place in church with saint's icon was built, and pilgrimage to Aegina was organized. In 2015 Eparchy of Osječko polje and Baranja initiated building of smaller church dedicated to Nectarios of Aegina.

Church of St. Nicholas, Karlovac

The Church of St. Nicholas or Karlovac Cathedral (Serbian: Саборна црква Светог Николе у Карловцу), is a Serbian Orthodox church located in Karlovac, in central Croatia. The original church (destroyed in 1993) was finished in 1787, and was dedicated to Saint Nicholas. In 2007, the church was completely renovated.

Church of St. Nicholas, Pačetin

Church of St. Nicholas (Croatian: Hram svetog Nikole, Serbian Cyrillic: Храм светог Николе) in Pačetin is Serbian Orthodox church in eastern Croatia. The church is dedicated to St. Nicholas.

Church of St. Peter and Paul, Bolman

Church of St. Peter and Paul (Croatian: Crkva svetog Petra i Pavla, Serbian Cyrillic: Црква светог Петра и Павла) in Bolman is a Serbian Orthodox church in eastern Croatia. The church is dedicated to St. Peter and Paul.

Church of St. Peter and Paul, Tepljuh

Church of Saint Peter and Paul in Tepljuh is Serbian Orthodox church in Croatia.

Church of St. Stephen, Borovo

The Church of St. Stephen (Croatian: Crkva svetog Stefana, Serbian Cyrillic: Црква светог Стефана) in Borovo is a Serbian Orthodox church in eastern Croatia. The church was built in the period from 1761 to 1764. Under its patronage was carried out first educational activities in the village. Church is listed in Register of Cultural Goods of Croatia. Iconostasis with 49 icons and other inventory is also specifically listed in Register.

Church of the Nativity of the Virgin, Drežnica

Church of Nativity of the Virgin is a Serbian Orthodox church in Drežnica, Croatia.

Church of the Nativity of the Virgin, Srijemske Laze

Church of the Nativity of the Virgin in Srijemske Laze is a Serbian Orthodox church in Vukovar-Syrmia County in eastern Croatia. Church is dedicated to Nativity of Mary and was built in 1793. The building is listed in Register of Cultural Goods of Croatia.

During the history building was renewed three times, in 1792, 1925 and 2003. Iconostasis with 21 icon was built in 1926. During World War II and Independent State of Croatia church movable property was taken away, and church was converted into Roman Catholic one.

Cultural and Scientific Center "Milutin Milanković"

Cultural and Scientific Center "Milutin Milanković" is a public cultural and educational institution in Dalj, Erdut municipality, Croatia. The aim of center include following activities: promotion of the legacy of Milutin Milanković, organizing cultural events and exhibitions, issuing publications, audiovisual and promotional materials, preservation of traditional heritage, organization of cultural and scientific meetings, promotion of sustainable development, popularization of science... In 2012 center was visited by more than 5,000 visitors.Center is located in the birth house of scientist Milutin Milanković. After the end of the Croatian War of Independence and the end of United Nations Transitional Administration for Eastern Slavonia, Baranja and Western Sirmium mission house remained in deteriorating conditions up to the year of 2006. At that time Municipality initiated establishment of the center which will serve as the meeting point of students coming from both banks of Danude River.

D213 road

D213 is a state road in Slavonia region of Croatia connecting Dalj and nearby Erdut border crossing to Serbia to D2 state road east of Osijek. The road is 26.7 km (16.6 mi) long.The road, as well as all other state roads in Croatia, is managed and maintained by Hrvatske ceste, state owned company.

D519 road

D519 is a state road in Slavonia region of Croatia connecting Dalj and nearby Vukovar via Borovo Naselje and the D2 state road. The road is 16.2 km (10.1 mi) long.The road, as well as all other state roads in Croatia, is managed and maintained by Hrvatske ceste, state owned company.

Dalj massacre

The Dalj massacre was the killing of 56 or 57 Croats in Dalj, Croatia on 1 August 1991, during the Croatian War of Independence. In addition to civilian victims, the figure includes 20 Croatian policemen, 15 Croatian National Guard (Zbor narodne garde – ZNG) troops and four civil defencemen who had been defending the police station and water supply building in the village. While some of the policemen and the ZNG troops died in combat, those who surrendered were killed after they became prisoners of war. They tried to fight off an attack by the Croatian Serb SAO Eastern Slavonia, Baranja and Western Syrmia (SAO SBWS) Territorial Defence Forces, supported by the Yugoslav People's Army (Jugoslovenska Narodna Armija – JNA) and the Serb Volunteer Guard paramilitaries. The SAO SBWS was declared an autonomous territory in eastern Croatia following the Battle of Borovo Selo just to the south of Dalj.

After the attack, the non-Serb civilian population in the village and the surrounding area was persecuted. They were forced to flee their homes, as they would have been imprisoned, physically abused or killed if they did not. After the war, the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) charged high-ranking SAO SBWS and Serbian officials, including Slobodan Milošević and Goran Hadžić, with war crimes committed in Dalj. The killings were extensively covered by German media leading to forming of a public opinion in support of Croatia. By the end of 1991, Germany adopted support for diplomatic recognition of Croatia as its policy and duty.

Eparchy of Osječko polje and Baranja

Eparchy of Osječko polje and Baranja (Serbian Cyrillic: Епархија осјечкопољска и барањска or Епархија осечкопољска и барањска; Croatian: Osječkopoljska i baranjska eparhija) is an eparchy (diocese) of the Serbian Orthodox Church encompassing easternmost areas of Croatia, with seat in Dalj.

Since the death of bishop Lukijan Vladulov in spring of 2017, the Eparchy is administered by bishop Irinej Bulović of Bačka. The eparchy has three vicarages (in Osijek, Vukovar and Baranja), with a total of 39 priests and two deacons.

Erdut

Erdut (Croatian pronunciation: [ěrduːt]; Serbian Cyrillic: Ердут; Hungarian: Erdőd [ˈɛrdøːd]) is a village in eastern Croatia, located some 37 km east of the major city of Osijek, lying on the border with neighbouring Serbia. The village of Erdut administratively belongs to the eponymous municipality and is the third largest settlement in the municipality. The municipality contains three other villages: Aljmaš, Bijelo Brdo and Dalj and it is part of the Osijek-Baranja County in eastern Slavonia. Municipal institutions are physically located in the largest village of Dalj.

Erdut killings

The Erdut killings were a series of murders of 37 Hungarian and Croat civilians in the village of Erdut, Croatia committed by Croatian Serb forces and Serb Volunteer Guard paramilitaries between November 1991 and June 1992, during the Croatian War of Independence. Twenty-two Hungarians and 15 Croats were killed. The first killings occurred on 10 November 1991, when twelve civilians died. Eight more were killed over the following several days. Five more civilians were killed on 10 December, and another seven on 16 December. Four others were killed on 21 February 1992 and the final one was killed on 3 June. The bodies of these victims were either buried in mass graves or thrown into nearby wells.

Most of the victims were exhumed in 1998, after the area reverted to Croatian control following the signing of the Erdut Agreement in 1995. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) charged several Serbian and Croatian Serb officials, including Slobodan Milošević, Jovica Stanišić, Franko Simatović and Goran Hadžić, for their alleged involvement in the killings. Milošević and Hadžić died before their trials could be completed. Stanišić and Simatović were initially acquitted, but their acquittals were overturned on appeal, and they are being retried.

High School Dalj

High School Dalj is a public high school in Dalj, Erdut municipality, Croatia. The school offers the students the following educational programs: Economist, Commercial Officer (in Serbian), Agricultural Technician and Agricultural Technician General. In accordance with rights derived from Erdut Agreement Serbian minority in this school use right of education in minority language. For this reason, students can attend classes in Croatian or Serbian language and Serbian Cyrillic alphabet.

Independent Democratic Serb Party

The Independent Democratic Serb Party (Croatian: Samostalna demokratska srpska stranka or SDSS, Serbian Cyrillic: Самостална демократска српска странка, СДСС) is a social democratic political party of Serbs of Croatia.

Orahovica Monastery

The Orahovica Monastery is a Serbian Orthodox monastery in Orahovica, Croatia. It is mentioned in 1583 when it was a seat of the Požega metropolitanate and an important culturo-religious center, located in the then Virovitica County. It is thought to have been built before the end of the 15th century.

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