Dale Hackbart

Dale Leonard Hackbart (born July 21, 1938) is a former American football defensive back who played twelve seasons in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers, Washington Redskins, Minnesota Vikings, St. Louis Cardinals, and Denver Broncos from 1960 to 1973. He also played in the Canadian Football League for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in 1964 and 1965.

Hackbart initially focused on baseball. He spent a season playing baseball for the Grand Forks Chiefs; a Class C minor league team in the Pittsburgh Pirates organization. Bud Grant convinced Hackbart to drop baseball and concentrate on a career in the National Football League.[1]

Hackbart was drafted by the Minnesota franchise in the inaugural 1960 American Football League Draft as a quarterback and "territorial selection." He was drafted in the fifth round of the 1960 NFL draft as a generic "back" by the Packers. As Minnesota would never play in the AFL (the group instead joined the NFL as the Minnesota Vikings), Hackbart joined the Packers. Hackbart would eventually join the Vikings in 1966, by this point solely as a defensive back.

In 1973, Hackbart was involved in an on-field transgression that he eventually took to court. He asserted that a late hit by Cincinnati Bengals running back Boobie Clark was an intentional tort.

He was with the Denver Broncos and was their starting safety in 1973.

In the first 1973 regular season game against the Cincinnati Bengals Hackbart's neck was fractured. "It was just before halftime and the Bengals had the ball at around the 45 yard line going in. Boobie Clark came out of a split backfield and ran down the hash marks. I was playing free safety so I dropped back to the center of the field. The ball went up in the air and I converged into the endzone. Billy Thompson, who was playing left corner for the Broncos, jumped in front of me and Boobie Clark and intercepted the pass. I tried to block Boobie and landed on the ground. When I came up on to one knee watching Thompson run the ball, Boobie came up from behind me and whacked me in the back of the head, with a right fore-arm and drove me into the ground, after the Play was finished. My left arm went numb ! At halftime in the locker room I couldn’t take off my helmet so I was packed in ice around my neck and helmet." Hackbart did not at the time report the happening to his coaches or to anyone else during the game. However, because of the pain which he experienced he was unable to play golf the next day. He did not seek medical attention, but the continued pain caused him to report this fact and the incident to the Bronco trainer who gave him treatment. Apparently he played on the specialty teams for two successive Sundays, but after that the Broncos released him on waivers. (He was in his thirteenth year as a player.) He sought medical help and it was then that X-rays were taken, which revealed that the C4, 5, 6, and 7 vertebrae on his neck were fractured. This injury ended his football career.

In 1974 neurosurgeons told Hackbart that if he didn’t have surgery to repair the damage, he would lose use of his left arm, shoulder, and any muscles involved with the damaged vertebrae. The Broncos claimed they were not liable. Hackbart hired an attorney, Rodger Johnson of Johnson & Mahony, and brought a suit against the Bengals. Hackbart v. the Cincinnati Bengals became a precedent setting case. In the case the courts ruled that in the course of a professional football game an intentional infliction of an injury by one player upon another might constitute a tort.

As a result of the lawsuit, the National Football League mandated that all stadiums had to be equipped with X-ray machines. The head slap maneuver which injured Hackbart was banned. Later, rules against spearing with the helmet and helmet to helmet contact were created. Hackbart settled with the Bengals and the Broncos filed a Workman's Compensation claim which paid for the surgery that was performed in 1976.

The case was eventually appealed to the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals in 1979 and has become a key point of discussion in several first year law school tort classes. Hackbart v. Cincinnati Bengals, Inc., 601 F.2d 516 (10th Cir. 1979).[2]

Dale Hackbart
No. 40, 46, 49, 48
Born:July 21, 1938 (age 80)
Madison, Wisconsin
Career information
Position(s)Defensive back
CollegeWisconsin
AFL draft1960 / Round: 1 / Pick: territorial
Drafted byMinneapolis AFL team
NFL draft1960 / Round: 5 / Pick: 51
Career history
As player
1960–1961Green Bay Packers
1961–1963Washington Redskins
1964–1965Winnipeg Blue Bombers
1966–1970Minnesota Vikings
1971–1972St. Louis Cardinals
1973Denver Broncos
Career highlights and awards
Career stats

NFL Green Bay Packers 1961 50 Year Championship Reunion

Dale attended the 2011 Reunion at Lambeau Field, in Green Bay Wisconsin, October 2, 2011. [3][4]

References

https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/H/HackDa20.htm

  1. ^ Bud Grant On Losing 4 Super Bowls
  2. ^ Hackbart v. Cincinnati Bengals, Inc., 601 F.2d 516 (10th Cir. 1979)
  3. ^ http://www.packers.com/media-center/videos/Alumni-Spotlight-Jerry-Kramer/78627c7d-90ec-425c-ab6e-a7a83ef71750?campaign=FB120422
  4. ^ http://www.fox11online.com/dpp/news/local/green_bay/1961-Packers-champs-celebrate-50-years
1958 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1958 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1958 Big Ten Conference football season.

1958 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1958 Big Ten Conference football season was the 63rd season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1958 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1958 Iowa Hawkeyes football team, under head coach Forest Evashevski, won the Big Ten football championship and was ranked No. 2 in the final AP and UPI polls, both taken before the bowl games. After defeating California, 38–12, in the 1959 Rose Bowl, the Hawkeyes were voted national champion by the Football Writers Association of America in its post-bowl ranking. Iowa quarterback Randy Duncan won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy as the Big Ten's most valuable player, was a consensus first-team All-American, and finished second in the 1958 voting for the Heisman Trophy.

The 1958 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Milt Bruhn, finished in second place in the Big Ten with a 7–1–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (8.6 points allowed per game), and was ranked No. 7 in the final AP Poll. Wisconsin's sole loss was to Iowa. Dale Hackbart led the Badgers with 641 passing yards and 1,032 yards of total offense.

The 1958 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Woody Hayes, compiled a 6–1–2 record and was ranked No. 8 in the final AP Poll. Fullback Bob White was a consensus first-team All-American and led the Big Ten with 859 rushing yards and 72 points scored. End Jim Houston and tackle Jim Marshall were also selected as first-team All-Americans by multiple selectors.

Other notable individual performances during the 1958 season include Michigan State end Sam Williams who was selected as a consensus first-team All-American and Illinois end Rich Kreitling who led the Big Ten with 688 receiving yards.

1958 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1958 Wisconsin Badgers football team represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1958 Big Ten Conference football season.

1959 All-Big Ten Conference football team

The 1959 All-Big Ten Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Big Ten Conference teams for the 1959 Big Ten Conference football season.

1959 Big Ten Conference football season

The 1959 Big Ten Conference football season was the 64th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1959 NCAA University Division football season.

The 1959 Wisconsin Badgers football team, under head coach Milt Bruhn, won the Big Ten championship, was ranked No. 6 in the final AP Poll, and lost to Washington in the 1960 Rose Bowl. Tackle Dan Lanphear was a consensus first-team All-American. Quarterback Dale Hackbart led the Big Ten with 1,121 yards of total offense.

1959 College Football All-America Team

The 1959 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1959. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1959 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) The Sporting News (TSN), and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

Billy Cannon of LSU, Charlie Flowers of Ole Miss, Dan Lanphear of Wisconsin, and Roger Davis of Syracuse were the only four players to be unanimously named first-team All-Americans by all six official selectors. Cannon won the 1959 Heisman Trophy.

1959 Wisconsin Badgers football team

The 1959 Wisconsin Badgers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Wisconsin in the 1959 Big Ten Conference football season, and in the 1960 Rose Bowl as the champions of the Big Ten Conference.

1960 American Football League draft

The 1960 American Football League draft was held on November 22–23, 1959, in Minneapolis, shortly after the organization of the league, and lasted 33 rounds. An additional draft of 20 rounds was held by the AFL on December 2.

1960 Green Bay Packers season

The 1960 Green Bay Packers season was their 42nd season overall and their 40th season in the National Football League. The club posted an 8–4 record under second-year head coach Vince Lombardi to win the Western Conference and a berth in the NFL championship game. It was the Packers' first appearance in the title game since winning it in 1944. After a Thanksgiving Day loss at Detroit, the Packers won their final three games, all on the road, to win the crown.

The championship game was against the Eastern Conference champion Philadelphia Eagles (10–2), played at Franklin Field in Philadelphia on Monday, December 26. Two years earlier in 1958, both teams had been last in their respective conferences, winning a combined three games.

In a close game, the Packers led in the fourth quarter, but lost 17–13. Green Bay returned to the title game the next two seasons and won both.

1960 Rose Bowl

The 1960 Rose Bowl was a college football bowl game played on Friday, January 1, 1960, at the end of the 1959 college football season. It was the 46th Rose Bowl Game. This was the first Rose Bowl appearance by the Huskies since the 1944 Rose Bowl and the first appearance by the Badgers since the 1953 Rose Bowl. This was the first time these two football programs met on the field. The Washington Huskies defeated the Wisconsin Badgers, 44–8.

1966 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1966 season was the Minnesota Vikings' sixth in the National Football League. Sixth-year head coach Norm Van Brocklin resigned at the end of the season, after the team finished with a 4–9–1 record.

1970 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1970 season was the Minnesota Vikings' 10th in the National Football League and the first season following the AFL–NFL merger. Under head coach Bud Grant, they finished with a 12–2 record and won the first ever NFC Central title before losing to the San Francisco 49ers at home in the NFC Divisional Playoff game. The Vikings' defense became the second defense in the history of the NFL to lead the league in fewest points allowed and fewest total yards allowed for two consecutive seasons.

1971 Minnesota Vikings season

The 1971 Minnesota Vikings season was the franchise's 11th season in the National Football League. The Vikings won the NFC Central title as they finished with a record of 11 wins and three losses, before losing to the eventual Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys at home, 20–12, in the NFC Divisional Playoff game.

In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1971 Vikings as the fourth-greatest defense in NFL history, saying, "[c]onsidering that their motto was 'Meet at the quarterback,' it's no surprise that the Purple People Eaters held opposing QBs to a 40.4 rating, one of the lowest ever." ESPN also noted that the 1971 Vikings "shut out three opponents, and only one team scored more than 20 points against them. As a result, Alan Page became the first defensive player to ever be named NFL MVP. Carl Eller, Jim Marshall and safety Paul Krause joined Page on the All-Pro team."

1971 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1971 St. Louis Cardinals season was the 52nd season the team was in the National Football League and twelfth in St. Louis. The team failed to improve on their previous year's 8–5–1 record, winning only four games. They failed to reach the playoffs for the 23rd straight season, their previous appearance was in 1948 in the championship game.

This was the last season the team was co-owned by Charles Bidwill, Jr.; he sold his share to his younger brother Bill in September 1972. The adopted sons of Charles and Violet Bidwill, the two had co-owned the team since their mother's death in January 1962.

1972 St. Louis Cardinals (NFL) season

The 1972 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 53rd year with the National Football League and thirteenth in St. Louis. On September 2, Bill Bidwill purchased the stock of his brother Charles "Stormy" Bidwill to become sole owner of the Cardinals. The adopted sons of Charles and Violet Bidwill, the two had co-owned the team since their mother's death in January 1962.After starting at 2–2, with wins over 1970 and 1971 playoff participants Baltimore and Minnesota, the Cardinals went 0–7–1, then won their final two games over the Rams and Eagles to finish at 4–9–1 for the second consecutive season and third time in the past four. Second-year head coach Bob Hollway was fired December 18, the day after the regular season finale, succeeded a month later by San Diego State head coach Don Coryell.

Boobie Clark

Charles Lee "Boobie" Clark (November 8, 1949 – October 25, 1988) was a professional American football running back who played in the National Football League for eight seasons and was named the UPI AFL-AFC Rookie of the Year for 1973.

Grand Forks Chiefs

The Grand Forks Chiefs were a minor league baseball team from Grand Forks, North Dakota. They played in the Northern League from 1934 to 1964, with a couple breaks in between.

List of Oakland Raiders first-round draft picks

The Oakland Raiders are a professional American football team based in Oakland, California. They are a member of the American Football Conference West Division (AFC West). The team began play in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League, which merged with the National Football League in 1970. In 1982, the team relocated to Los Angeles, where they remained until the franchise returned to Oakland in 1995. The franchise has selected 53 players in the first round, two of these being the first overall pick.

The NFL Draft, which is officially known as the "Player Selection Meeting", is held each April. The draft is used as the primary means to distribute newly available talent (primarily from college football) equitably amongst the teams. Selections are made in reverse order based on the previous season's record, i.e., the club with the worst record from the previous season selects first. Through 2009, only two exceptions were made to this order: the Super Bowl champion always selects last (32nd), and the Super Bowl loser second to last (31st). Beginning in 2010, teams making the playoffs have been seeded in reverse order depending upon how far they advance. The draft consists of seven rounds. Teams have the option of trading selections for players, cash and/or other selections (including future year selections). Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.The Raiders have selected first twice. They have also selected the second overall pick twice. The University of Southern California has the most players chosen by the Raiders from one university, with four selections.

Mickey Mangham

Michael Ray "Mickey" Manghan (August 25, 1939 – September 16, 2010) was an American football player for the LSU Tigers from 1958 to 1960. He played at the end position on both offense and defense and was selected as an Academic All-America and All-SEC player. He is most remembered for catching the winning touchdown pass in the Sugar Bowl on January 1, 1959, to give LSU the national championship for the 1958 college football season.

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