DC Comics Two Thousand

DC Comics Two Thousand, also known as DC Two Thousand and DC 2000, is a two-issue miniseries by DC Comics in which the Justice League of America and the Justice Society of America team up, via time travel, to stop the attempts of T. O. Morrow to alter the present by changing the past. The two issues of the series were released in January and February 2000, in prestige format.

DC Comics Two Thousand
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Publication information
PublisherDC Comics
ScheduleMonthly
FormatLimited series
Genre
Publication dateJanuary – February 2000
No. of issues2
Main character(s)
Creative team
Written byTom Peyer
Penciller(s)Val Semeiks
Inker(s)Prentis Rollins
Letterer(s)Kurt Hathaway
Colorist(s)
Editor(s)

Synopsis

Issue 1

In the year 2000, T. O. Morrow is the ruler of the world, as a result of using a time-travel machine called M.O.R.R.O.W. to strategically send pieces of modern technology (a laptop, an artificial heart, et cetera) to specific places in the year 1941. In the past, the newly formed Justice Society is investigating the mysterious technological devices they've encountered, when a group of heroes from 2000—The Justice League—arrives, determined to take back the future devices and restore their time-period. The JSA's Spectre looks into the JLA members' minds, and sees the worst parts of the future (e.g., the dismantling of New Deal programs, causing the poor to suffer greatly). Rather than allow that future to occur, The Spectre imprisons the JLA members in 1941.

Issue 2

The League members escape their imprisonment and return to 2000, where Morrow's citadel is being attacked by descendents of the JSA; made corrupt by unearned power, the heirs of the Society intend to hijack M.O.R.R.O.W. for their own purposes. In 1941, most of the JSA members plan to use Morrow's technology to improve the world, but The Flash (Jay Garrick) tries to tell them that it's wrong to do so. Later, Flash stops the future Morrow from killing his own mother in the past; he'd intended to make himself "tougher" by having been an orphan, but Flash shows him that that's a line even Morrow can't cross.

The JSA travels to the year 2000 and sees what has happened to the world as a result of Morrow's efforts and their own. With Morrow's help, they use M.O.R.R.O.W. to take back all the year-2000 devices that had been sent to 1941, thus restoring the future.

References

All-Star Squadron

The All-Star Squadron is a DC Comics superhero team that debuted in Justice League of America #193 (August 1981) and was created by Roy Thomas, Rich Buckler and Jerry Ordway.

All Star Comics

All Star Comics is an American comic book series from All-American Publications, one of three companies that merged with National Periodical Publications to form the modern-day DC Comics. While the series' cover-logo trademark reads All Star Comics, its copyrighted title as indicated by postal indicia is All-Star Comics, with a hyphen. With the exception of the first two issues, All Star Comics told stories about the adventures of the Justice Society of America, the first team of superheroes, and introduced Wonder Woman.

Atom (Al Pratt)

Al Pratt is a character in the DC Comics Universe, the original hero to fight crime as the Atom. He initially had no superpowers; instead, he was a diminutive college student and later a physicist, usually depicted as a "tough-guy" character.

Commander Steel

Commander Steel (also Captain Steel) is the name of three comic book superheroes appearing in publications by the American publisher DC Comics, all members of the same family. The first Steel appeared in Steel, The Indestructible Man #1 (1978), and was created by Gerry Conway and Don Heck. His stories were set in World War II. The two later characters called Steel are his grandsons.

Nate Heywood / Steel appears in Legends of Tomorrow, starting from the second season, portrayed by Nick Zano, while his grandfather Henry Heywood / Commander Steel was portrayed by Matthew MacCaull. Nate’s father Hank Heywood was portrayed by Tom Wilson.

DC Universe

The DC Universe (DCU) is the fictional shared universe where most stories in American comic book titles published by DC Comics take place. DC superheroes such as Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman are from this universe, and it also contains well known supervillains such as Lex Luthor, the Joker and Darkseid. In context, the term "DC Universe" usually refers to the main DC continuity.

The term "DC Multiverse" refers to the collection of all continuities within DC Comics publications. Within the Multiverse, the main DC Universe has gone by many names, but in recent years has been referred to by "Prime Earth" (not to be confused with "Earth Prime") or "Earth 0".

The main DC Universe, as well as the alternate realities related to it, began as the first shared universe in comic books and were quickly adapted to other media such as film serials or radio dramas. In subsequent decades, the continuity between all of these media became increasingly complex with certain storylines and events designed to simplify or streamline the more confusing aspects of characters' histories.

Earth-Three

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Earth-Two

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Following the events of Flashpoint, Earth 2 underwent an additional reiteration. While it still houses a team of superheroes, its membership is younger than before. Earth 2 also has a tragic backstory, having been invaded by a horde of alien invaders from Apokolips five years prior to the reboot, ahead of Darkseid's attempted invasion of Prime Earth. In the process, this reality's Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman all died, while its Supergirl and Robin were swept through a dimensional warp to Prime Earth where they became known as Power Girl and Huntress.

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The team received its own comic book title called Justice League of America in November 1960. With the 2011 relaunch, DC Comics released a second volume of Justice League. In July 2016, the DC Rebirth initiative again relaunched the Justice League comic book titles with the third volume of Justice League. Since its inception, the team has been featured in various films, television programs, and video games.

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Justice Society of America

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The team was initially popular, but in the late 1940s, the popularity of superhero comics waned, and the JSA's adventures ceased with issue #57 of the title (March 1951). JSA members remained absent from comics until ten years later, when the original Flash appeared alongside a new character by that name in The Flash #123 (September 1961). During the Silver Age of Comic Books, DC Comics reinvented several Justice Society members and banded many of them together in the Justice League of America. The Justice Society was established as existing on "Earth-Two" and the Justice League on "Earth-One". This allowed for annual cross-dimensional team-ups of the teams between 1963 and 1985. New series, such as All-Star Squadron, Infinity, Inc. and a new All-Star Comics featured the JSA, their children and their heirs. These series explored the issues of aging, generational differences, and contrasts between the Golden Age and subsequent eras.

The 1985 Crisis on Infinite Earths limited series merged all of the company's various alternate realities into one, placing the JSA as World War II-era predecessors to the company's modern characters. A JSA series was published from 1999 to 2006, and a Justice Society of America series ran from 2007 to 2011. As part of DC Comics' 2011 relaunch of its entire line of monthly books an unnamed version of the team appears in the Earth 2 Vol 1 (2012–2015), Earth 2 World's End (2014–2015), and Earth 2: Society (2015–2017).

Sheldon Mayer

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He is among those credited with rescuing the unsold Superman comic strip from the rejection pile.

Mayer was inducted into the comic book industry's Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1992 and the Will Eisner Comic Book Hall of Fame in 2000. Mayer is not to be confused with fellow Golden Age comics professional Sheldon Moldoff.

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Super Juniors are a group of fictional DC Comics characters based on members of the Justice League of America, designed as baby versions in order to appeal to younger audiences and introduce them to the publisher's most popular properties. At Kenner's request, first appeared in José Luis García-López's 1982 DC Comics Style Guide and had their first and only adventure in Super Jrs. Holiday Special: The Best of DC Blue Ribbon Digest #58 (March 1985) in a story written by Tom DeFalco and drawn by Vince Squeglia. There was a considerable amount of merchandise (toys, wallpapers, bed sheets and covers, furniture, flash cards, coloring books, etc.) based on them.

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T. O. Morrow

T. O. Morrow is a comic book supervillain published by DC Comics. He is responsible for the creation of the Red Tornado, Red Inferno, Red Torpedo, Red Volcano and Tomorrow Woman androids, the last of these with the help of Professor Ivo.

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