DAW Books

DAW Books is an American science fiction and fantasy publisher, founded by Donald A. Wollheim following his departure from Ace Books in 1971. The company claims to be "the first publishing company ever devoted exclusively to science fiction and fantasy." [1] The first DAW Book published was the 1972 short story collection Spell of the Witch World, by Andre Norton.

In its early years under the leadership of Wollheim and his wife Elsie, DAW gained a reputation of publishing popular, though not always critically acclaimed, works of science fiction and fantasy. Nevertheless, in the 1970s the company published numerous books by award-winning authors such as Marion Zimmer Bradley, Fritz Leiber, Edward Llewellyn, Jerry Pournelle, Roger Zelazny, and many others. In 1982, C. J. Cherryh's Downbelow Station was the first DAW book to win the Hugo Award for best novel, gaining the publishing house increased respect within the industry.

Until June 1984, all DAW books were characterized by yellow spines, and a prominent yellow cover box containing the company's logo as well as a chronological publication number. When the design was changed, the chronological number was retained, but moved to the copyright page and renamed the DAW Collectors' Book Number.

As of October 2010, the company had published more than 1,500 titles during its 38-year history.Although it has a distribution relationship with Penguin Group and is headquartered in Penguin USA's offices, DAW is editorially independent and closely held by its current publishers, Betsy Wollheim (Donald's daughter) and Sheila E. Gilbert.[2][3] The company's offices are in New York City.

DAW Books
DAW Books Logo
Founded1971
FounderDonald A. Wollheim
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationNew York City, New York
DistributionPenguin Group/PRH
Key peopleElizabeth R. Wollheim
Sheila E. Gilbert
Publication typesBooks
Fiction genresScience fiction, fantasy
Official websitedawbooks.com

References

DAW SF collection
A number of paperback books published by DAW
  1. ^ http://www.penguin.com/publishers/daw/
  2. ^ Lassen, Jeremy (July 26, 2003). "A View From Corona #12". Night Shade Books. Archived from the original on 9 April 2012. Retrieved 11 October 2010.
  3. ^ "Locus Online: Betsy Wollheim interview excerpts". Locus. June 2006. Retrieved 2017-12-06.

External links

Flight to Opar

Flight to Opar is a fantasy novel by American writer Philip José Farmer, first published in paperback by DAW Books in June 1976, and reprinted twice through 1983. The first British edition was published by Magnum in 1977; it was reprinted by Methuen in 1983. It was later gathered together with a preceding novel, Hadon of Ancient Opar, and a sequel, The Song of Kwasin, into the omnibus collection Gods of Opar: Tales of Lost Khokarsa (2012). The work has also been translated into French. It and the other books in the series purport to fill in some of the ancient prehistory of the lost city of Opar, created by Edgar Rice Burroughs as a setting for his Tarzan series.

Foreigner universe

The Foreigner universe is a fictional universe created by American writer C. J. Cherryh. The series centers on the descendants of a ship lost in transit from Earth en route to found a new space station. It consists of a series of semi-encapsulated trilogy arcs (or sequences) that focus on the life of Bren Cameron, the human paidhi, a translator-diplomat to the court of the ruling atevi race. Currently nineteen novels have been published between 1994 and 2018. Cherryh has also self-published two ebook short story prequels to the series, "Deliberations" (October 2012) and "Invitations" (August 2013).

Cherryh calls the series "First Contact". Four of the books were shortlisted for the Locus Award for Best Science Fiction Novel.

Gor

Gor is the Counter-Earth setting for an extended series of sword and planet novels by author and philosophy professor John Norman. The series is inspired particularly by the Barsoom series and Almuric, but is also known for its content combining philosophy, erotica and science fantasy. The series is known for its repeated depiction of sexual fantasies involving men abducting and physically and sexually brutalizing women, who grow to enjoy their submissive state. According to The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Norman's "sexual philosophy" is "widely detested", but the books have inspired a Gorean subculture.The series has been variably referred to by publishers with several names including The Chronicles of Counter-Earth (Ballantine Books), The Saga of Tarl Cabot (DAW Books), Gorean Cycle (Tandem Books), Gorean Chronicles (Masquerade Books), Gorean Saga (Open Road Media) and The Counter-Earth Saga (DAW Books, for novels with a protagonist other than Tarl Cabot).

Green Star Series

The Green Star Series is a set of five science fantasy novels written by American writer Lin Carter, published by DAW Books, from 1972 to 1976. In these novels, the concept of soul-projection (introduced by Edgar Rice Burroughs in his John Carter Series) is central. The series is written from the viewpoint of an anonymous, rich, crippled 30-year-old who seeks adventure—and finds it on a planet revolving around a green star.

Hadon of Ancient Opar

Hadon of Ancient Opar is a fantasy novel by American writer Philip José Farmer, first published in paperback by DAW Books in April 1974, and reprinted three times through 1983. The first British edition was published by Magnum in 1977; it was reprinted by Methuen in 1993. The first trade paperback edition was published by Titan Books in 2013. The work has also been translated into French. It was later gathered together with its sequels Flight to Opar and The Song of Kwasin into the omnibus collection Gods of Opar: Tales of Lost Khokarsa (2012). It and its sequels purport to fill in some of the ancient prehistory of the lost city of Opar, created by Edgar Rice Burroughs as a setting for his Tarzan series.

Lost Worlds (Carter collection)

Lost Worlds is a collection of fantasy short stories edited by American writer Lin Carter. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in 1980.

The book collects eight stories by Carter, three of them collaborative, on the subject of such "lost worlds" as Atlantis, Mu, Valusia, and other "sunken continents beyond memory," together with an introduction and afterward by the author.

Phoenix and Ashes

Phoenix and Ashes (2004) is a fantasy novel by American writer Mercedes Lackey, a well-known fantasy author. Based on the story of Cinderella, Phoenix and Ashes is a stand-alone book, though it is usually grouped with her other Elementals books.

The Book of Philip K. Dick

The Book of Philip K. Dick is a collection of science fiction stories by American writer Philip K. Dick. It was first published by DAW Books in 1973. The book was subsequently published in the United Kingdom by Coronet in 1977 under the title The Turning Wheel and Other Stories. The stories had originally appeared in the magazines Startling Stories, Science Fiction Stories, Galaxy Science Fiction, Orbit Science Fiction, Imaginative Tales and Amazing Stories.

The Tree of Swords and Jewels

The Tree of Swords and Jewels is a 1983 fantasy novel by American writer C. J. Cherryh. It is the second of two novels in Cherryh's Ealdwood Stories series, the first being The Dreamstone. The series draws on Celtic mythology and is about Ealdwood, a forest at the edge of Faery, and Arafel, a Daoine Sidhe.The Tree of Swords and Jewels was first published in 1983 as a paperback edition by DAW Books, and featured cover art by Michael Whelan. The Dreamstone and The Tree of Swords and Jewels were later republished in three omnibuses:

Arafel's Saga (1983, DAW Books)

Ealdwood (1991, Victor Gollancz) – includes revisions and a new ending

The Dreaming Tree (1997, DAW Books) – includes the revisions and new ending of Ealdwood (1991)

The Wizard of Zao

The Wizard of Zao is a fantasy novel written by Lin Carter, the second book of the Chronicles of Kylix series. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in June 1978.

The Year's Best Fantasy Stories

The Year's Best Fantasy Stories is a anthology of fantasy stories, edited by American writer Lin Carter. It was first published in paperback by DAW Books in 1975. Despite the anthology's title, it actually gathers together pieces originally published during a two-year period, 1973 and 1974.The book collects eleven novelettes and short stories by various fantasy authors deemed by the editor the best to be published during the period represented, together with an introductory survey of the year in fantasy, an essay on the year's best fantasy books, and introductory notes to the individual stories by the editor. The pieces include posthumously published works (the stories by Howard and Bok), and a "posthumous collaboration" (the story by Smith and Carter).

The Year's Best Fantasy Stories (series)

The Year’s Best Fantasy Stories was a series of annual anthologies published by DAW Books from 1975 to 1988 under the successive editorships of Lin Carter from 1975 to 1980 and Arthur W. Saha from 1981 to 1988. The series was a companion to DAW’s The Annual World’s Best SF, issued from 1972 to 1990 under the editorship of Saha with publisher Donald A. Wollheim, and The Year's Best Horror Stories, issued from 1971 to 1994, which performed a similar office for the science fiction and horror fiction genres.

Each annual volume reprinted what in the opinion of the editor was the best fantasy literature short fiction appearing in the previous year. Carter's picks tended to be idiosyncratic, concentrating on long-established authors in the field and reflecting his own particular enthusiasms. He also habitually padded out the volumes he edited with his own works, whether written singly, in collaboration, or under pseudonyms. Saha’s editorial choices more closely reflected the contemporary field and highlighted more emerging authors.

Under Carter's editorship surveys of "The Year’s Best Fantasy Books" and "The Year in Fantasy" rounded out each year’s collection, continuing the annual surveys of the year's best fantasy fiction he had formerly contributed to Castle of Frankenstein before that magazine's 1975 demise. Saha contented himself with a general introduction.

Under the Green Star

Under the Green Star is a science fantasy novel by American writer Lin Carter. Published by DAW Books in 1972, it is the first novel in his Green Star Series.

The story (and the entire series) is told from the point of an unnamed first-person narrator who is 30 years old, very wealthy but crippled, and who knows some eastern arts including soul casting.

We Can Build You

We Can Build You is a 1972 science fiction novel by American writer Philip K. Dick. Written in 1962 as The First in Our Family, it remained unpublished until appearing in serial form as A. Lincoln, Simulacrum in the November 1969 and January 1970 issues of Amazing Stories magazine, re-titled by editor Ted White. The novel was issued as a mass market paperback original by DAW Books in 1972, its final title provided by publisher Donald A. Wollheim. Its first hardcover edition was published in Italy in 1976, and Vintage issued a trade paperback in 1994.The magazine version of the story includes a brief closing chapter written by Ted White and very lightly copyedited by Dick. The Amazing editor felt that Dick's text did not properly complete the novel, and so he sent a draft conclusion to Dick, expecting him to overhaul it. Dick instead approved White's coda as written and altered only a few words. This final chapter, which Dick later expressed disapproval over, was not included when the novel was published in book form.

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