Dámaso Marte

Dámaso Marte Saviñón (born February 14, 1975) is a former Dominican Major League Baseball relief pitcher.[1] He played for the Seattle Mariners (1999), Pittsburgh Pirates (2001, 20062008), Chicago White Sox (20022005), and New York Yankees (20082011).[2]

Dámaso Marte
Dámaso Marté 2010
Marte with the New York Yankees
Relief pitcher
Born: February 14, 1975 (age 44)
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Batted: Left Threw: Left
MLB debut
June 30, 1999, for the Seattle Mariners
Last MLB appearance
July 7, 2010, for the New York Yankees
MLB statistics
Win–loss record23–27
Earned run average3.48
Strikeouts533
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Professional career

Seattle Mariners

Marte was signed as an amateur free agent by the Seattle Mariners in 1992. He made his major league debut on June 30, 1999, against the Oakland Athletics.

Pittsburgh Pirates

On November 16, 2000, Marte signed with the New York Yankees, but was traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates on June 13, 2001, for Enrique Wilson. In his Pirates debut, he hurled 3 innings of one-hit ball. He went on to throw 14 innings in which he only allowed 1 run and struck out a career-high 5 batters against the Cincinnati Reds.

Chicago White Sox

On March 27, 2002, Marte along with Edwin Yan were traded to the Chicago White Sox for Matt Guerrier. In 2003, he enjoyed his most successful big league season, where he went 4–2 with a 1.58 ERA in 79.7 innings pitched where he struck out a career high 87 batters. He continued his success in 2004 when he held opposing batters to a .217 batting average and left-handed batters to an average of .143. He also matched his career high for strikeouts in a game with 5 against the Florida Marlins.

A notable achievement for him was being the winning pitcher in the longest game in World Series history, Game 3 of the 2005 World Series. In that game, he tossed 1.2 scoreless innings and struck out three batters in the 14 inning win over the Houston Astros. The White Sox would then win the World Series against the Astros in 4 games.

Second stint with Pirates

On December 13, 2005, the White Sox traded Marte back to the Pittsburgh Pirates in exchange for Rob Mackowiak. Dámaso made 3 relief appearances in the World Baseball Classic for the Dominican Republic in 2006. Come the regular season, he went on to struggle a bit in where he lost 7 straight games as a reliever but still averaged 9.7 strikeouts per 9 innings pitched. In 2007, he enjoyed some success where he held left-handed batters to a .094 batting average. He also did not allow a hit in 32 consecutive at-bats against left-handers which happened to be the longest streak of consecutive hitless at-bats by a left-handed batter against any pitcher in the MLB. For a stint, after an injury to Matt Capps, Marte was the Pirates closing pitcher, and was fairly successful. During his stint as closer, he was traded to the New York Yankees.

New York Yankees

On July 26, 2008, Marte and Xavier Nady were traded to the Yankees for 4 minor leaguers José Tábata, Ross Ohlendorf, Jeff Karstens, and Dan McCutchen.[3] In his Yankees debut, he relieved José Veras (for only one batter), and faced David Ortiz, who struck out swinging.[4]

Following the 2008 season, the Yankees declined Marte's option. However, the Yankees then re-signed him to a new three-year deal with an option for a fourth.[5]

Following a disappointing regular season in which Marté posted an ERA of 9.45, he delivered an extraordinary performance for the Yankees in the playoffs. After a shaky first outing in Game 2 of the 2009 American League Division Series, in which he surrendered two consecutive singles to the Minnesota Twins before being relieved, Marte retired all twelve of the remaining batters he faced during the postseason. During Game 6 of the 2009 World Series, Marte faced Philadelphia Phillies stars Chase Utley and Ryan Howard, striking out both of them on the minimum 6 pitches. Marte and the Yankees went on to win Game 6, clinching the Series for the team's 27th championship.

Marte missed much of the 2010 season due to left arm inflammation. He underwent left shoulder surgery late in the 2010 season and was knocked out for the entire 2011 season.[6] In late June, Marte started to play catch in his journey to recovery.[7] He became a free agent at the end of the 2011 season after the Yankees declined his 2012 option and paid him a $250,000 buyout.[8]

Children's Foundation

Marte supports a children's foundation in his name.[9]

References

  1. ^ El Universal Yanquis de Nueva York declinan opción por Dámaso Marte 19 Oct 2011
  2. ^ Baseball Guide: The Ultimate Baseball Almanac Sporting News 2006 Page 217 "White Sox traded LHP Dámaso Marte to the Pirates for IF/OF Rob Mackowiak. Dodgers traded OF Milton Bradley and IF Antonio Perez to the Athletics for OF Andre Ethier. Cardinals signed LHP Ricardo Rincón."
  3. ^ "Yanks acquire Nady, Marte from Bucs for 4 minor league prospects". Sports Illustrated. 2008-07-26. Retrieved 2008-07-26.
  4. ^ "Pettitte, Cano lead Yanks to 8th straight win". Yahoo! Sports. Associated Press. 2008-07-26. Retrieved 2008-07-26.
  5. ^ Yankees sign LHP Damaso Marte to a three-year contract with a club option for 2012
  6. ^ Mlb.com
  7. ^ http://sports.espn.go.com/new-york/mlb/news/story?id=6687179
  8. ^ Hoch, Bryan (October 19, 2011). "Yankees decline 2012 option on lefty Marte". MLB.com. Retrieved 2011-10-20.
  9. ^ Niños de la Fundación "Dámaso Marte" viajan a Washington

External links

1999 Seattle Mariners season

The Seattle Mariners' 1999 season was their 23rd since the franchise creation, and ended the season finishing 3rd in the American League West with a 79–83 (.488) record. In July, after 39 home games at the Kingdome, they moved into Safeco Field, and the Kingdome was demolished eight months later.

2002 Chicago White Sox season

The 2002 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 103rd season, and their 102nd in Major League Baseball. They finished with a record 81-81, good enough for 2nd place in the American League Central, 13.5 games behind the champion Minnesota Twins.

2004 Caribbean Series

The forty-sixth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was held from February 1 through February 6 of 2004 with the champion baseball teams of the Dominican Republic, Tigres del Licey; Mexico, Tomateros de Culiacán; Puerto Rico, Leones de Ponce, and Venezuela, Tigres de Aragua. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice, and the games were played at Estadio Quisqueya in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

2005 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 2005 season was a season in which the Houston Astros qualified for the postseason for the second consecutive season. The Astros overcame a sluggish 15–30 start to claim the wild card playoff spot, and would go on to win the National League pennant to advance to the World Series for the first time in franchise history. It was longtime Astros first baseman Jeff Bagwell's final season and first World Series appearance.

2005 World Series

The 2005 World Series was the championship series of Major League Baseball's (MLB) 2005 season. The 101st edition of the World Series, it was a best-of-seven playoff between the American League (AL) champion Chicago White Sox and the National League (NL) champion Houston Astros; the White Sox swept the Astros in four games, winning their third World Series championship and their first in 88 seasons. Although the series was a sweep, all four games were quite close, being decided by two runs or fewer. The series was played between October 22–26, 2005.

Home-field advantage was awarded to Chicago by virtue of the AL's 7–5 victory over the NL in the 2005 MLB All-Star Game. The Astros were attempting to become the fourth consecutive wild card team to win the Series, following the Anaheim Angels (2002), Florida Marlins (2003) and Boston Red Sox (2004). Both teams were attempting to overcome decades of disappointment, with a combined 132 years between the two teams without a title. The Astros were making their first Series appearance in 44 years of play, while the White Sox had waited exactly twice as long for a title, having last won the Series in 1917, and had not been in the Series since 1959, three years before the Astros' inaugural season.

Like the 1982 World Series between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Milwaukee Brewers, the 2005 World Series is one of only two World Series in the modern era (1903–present) with no possibility for a rematch between the two opponents, because the Astros moved to the AL in 2013. However, the Brewers did meet the Cardinals in the 2011 NL Championship Series. The Astros would return to the World Series in 2017 as an AL franchise, where they would win in seven games against the Los Angeles Dodgers.

2006 World Baseball Classic – Pool 2

Pool 2 of the Second Round of the 2006 World Baseball Classic was held at Hiram Bithorn Stadium, San Juan, Puerto Rico from March 12 to 15, 2006.

Like the first round, Pool 2 was a round-robin tournament. The final two teams advanced to the semifinals.

NOTE: Tiebreaker notes: HTH − Head-to-head. RA − Runs against. IPD − Innings the team pitched. RA/9 − The index of (RA*9)/IPD.

2006 World Baseball Classic – Pool D

Pool D of the First Round of the 2006 World Baseball Classic was held at Cracker Jack Stadium, Lake Buena Vista, Florida, United States from March 7 to 10, 2006.

Pool D was a round-robin tournament. Each team played the other three teams once, with the top two teams advancing to Pool 2.

NOTE: Tiebreaker notes: HTH − Head-to-head. RA − Runs against. IPD − Innings the team pitched. RA/9 − The index of (RA*9)/IPD.

2008 New York Yankees season

The 2008 New York Yankees season was the 106th season for the New York Yankees franchise. The Yankees hosted the 2008 All-Star Game at Yankee Stadium on Tuesday July 15, 2008. It was the 83rd and last season at Yankee Stadium prior to the team's move to a new ballpark (also called "Yankee Stadium") just north of the current stadium. It also marked the first season since 1993 that the Yankees failed to make it to the playoffs (the 1994 strike canceled the postseason, though the Yankees had the best record in the American League that year.).

2008 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 2008 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 127th season of the franchise; the 122nd in the National League. This was their eighth season at PNC Park. It was the first under new president Frank Coonelly, general manager Neal Huntington, and manager John Russell. Unable to improve on their 68–94, last place finish during the 2007 season, the Pirates had not had a winning record or made it to the playoffs since 1992, and finished 67–95 for their 16th straight losing season. The season was the final of play-by-play announcer Lanny Frattare, whose 33-year tenure as Pirates' broadcaster was the longest in franchise history.

Daniel McCutchen

Daniel Thomas McCutchen (born September 26, 1982) is an American former professional baseball pitcher. He played in Major League Baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Texas Rangers.

Dámaso

Dámaso is a Spanish masculine given name. The name is equivalent to that of Pope Damasus I in English. The name also exists, though is less common, in Italian as Damaso without the accent.

Jeff Karstens

Jeffrey Wayne Karstens (born September 24, 1982) is a former right-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball (MLB). Karstens pitched for the New York Yankees in 2006 and 2007 and the Pittsburgh Pirates from 2008–2012.

Lancaster JetHawks

The Lancaster JetHawks are a minor league baseball team of the California League located in Lancaster, California. The team is named for the city's association with the aerospace industry and plays its home games at The Hangar. The Lancaster JetHawks are the Class A-Advanced affiliate of the Colorado Rockies. The JetHawks are the only California League team in Los Angeles County.

List of Major League Baseball players from the Dominican Republic

This is an alphabetical list of notable baseball players from the Dominican Republic who have played in Major League Baseball since 1950. Players in bold are still active in MLB, as of 2019.

Marte (surname)

Marte is a Spanish surname particularly common in the Dominican Republic. It is spelled the same as the planet Mars in Spanish, and does not have an accent é.

Notable persons with that name include:

Alfonso Marte (born 1992), Dominican footballer

Alfredo Marte (born 1989), Dominican baseball player

Andy Marte (born 1983), Dominican baseball player

Dámaso Marte (born 1975), Dominican baseball player

Domenic Marte, American singer

Jonathan de Marte (born 1993), Israeli-American baseball pitcher

Karen Marte, American slalom canoeist

Ketel Marte (born 1993), Dominican baseball player

Luis Marte (born 1986), American baseball player

María Marte (born 1976), Dominican chef

Starling Marte (born 1988), Dominican baseball player

Víctor Marte (born 1980), Dominican baseball player

Matt Guerrier

Matthew Olson Guerrier (born August 2, 1978) is an American former professional baseball relief pitcher. He attended Shaker Heights High School and college at Kent State University, and made his major league debut on June 17, 2004. He played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Minnesota Twins, Los Angeles Dodgers and Chicago Cubs.

Mendy López

Mendy López Aude (born October 15, 1973 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic) is a former baseball utility player.

Mick Kelleher

Michael Dennis Kelleher (born July 25, 1947) is an American former professional baseball player and coach. He played in Major League Baseball for the St. Louis Cardinals, Houston Astros, Chicago Cubs, Detroit Tigers, and California Angels. He coached for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Tigers, and the New York Yankees.

Slurve

The slurve is a baseball pitch in which the pitcher throws a curve ball as if it were a slider. The pitch is gripped like a curve ball, but thrown with a slider velocity. The term is a portmanteau of slider and curve.

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