Cypriot euro coins

Cypriot euro coins feature three separate designs for the three series of coins. Cyprus has been a member of the European Union since 1 May 2004, and is a member of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union. It has completed the third stage of the EMU and adopted the euro as its official currency on 1 January 2008.[1]

Cypriot euro design

For images of the common side and a detailed description of the coins, see euro coins.

Depiction of Cypriot euro coinage | Obverse side
Eurocoin.cy.001 Eurocoin.cy.002 Eurocoin.cy.005
The mouflon
10¢ 20¢ 50¢
Eurocoin.cy.010 Eurocoin.cy.020 Eurocoin.cy.050
The Kyrenia ship
€1 €2 € 2 Coin Edge
Eurocoin.cy.100 Eurocoin.cy.200 Edge cyprus s01 2 ΕΥΡΩ 2 EURO
The Idol of Pomos

Circulating Mintage quantities

The following table shows the mintage quantity for all Cypriot euro coins, per denomination, per year.[2]

Face Value €0,01 €0,02 €0,05 €0,10 €0,20 €0,50 €1,00 €2,00
2008 40 000 000 100 000 000 60 000 000 70 000 000 65 000 000 30 000 000 28 000 000 25 000 000
2009 20 000 000 1 000 000 6 000 000 1 000 000 1 000 000 1 000 000 4 000 000 5 000 000
2010 200 000 200 000 200 000 200 000 200 000 200 000 200 000 200 000
2011 15 210 000 210 000 30 210 000 210 000 210 000 210 000 210 000 210 000
2012 210 000 210 000 1 000 000 1 000 000 1 000 000 1 000 000 1 000 000 1 000 000
2013 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000
2014 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000
2015 7 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000
2016 8 000 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000
2017 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000
2018 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000 100 000

Mints

2008-2009: Finland[3]
2010-2018: Greece[3]

Identifying marks

National Identifier "ΚΥΠΡΟΣ (Kypros) and KIBRIS"
Mint Mark None
Engravers Initials None
€2 Edge inscription Edge cyprus s01

Design selection process

The official public contest for the design of the Cypriot euro coins, which ended on 14 October 2005, defined what the required motifs of the respective coins should encompass:[4]

  • 1 cent, 2 cent and 5 cent: The mouflon, the most characteristic species of fauna in Cyprus, representing the island's nature and wildlife.
  • 10 cent, 20 cent and 50 cent: The ancient Greek Kyrenia ship of 4th Century B.C., representing Cyprus's history and its character as an island as well as its importance in trade.
  • €1 and €2: The Idol of Pomos, a cross-shaped idol dating back to the Cypriot chalcolithic period (3000 B.C.), found in Pomos, a village in the district of Paphos. It is a characteristic example of prehistoric art in Cyprus, representing the island’s antiquity, culture and civilization.

American artist Erik Maell and Greek artist Tatiana Soteropoulos were chosen by the Central Bank of Cyprus to create and illustrate the designs to be used for the final coins. The artists were instructed to include the name of Cyprus in Greek and Turkish, that is, ΚΥΠΡΟΣ (Kypros) and KIBRIS in the design for the coins.

Euro adoption

On 11 October 2006 the final designs of the Cypriot euro coins were presented at the exhibition "Από τη Λίρα στο Ευρώ" ("From the Pound to the Euro") of the Central Bank of Cyprus about the history of currency in Cyprus.[5] They do not appear to include "Cyprus" in English, as demanded by the revised competition rules, but instead only in the state's two official languages, Greek and Turkish.

On 13 February 2007, the Republic of Cyprus formally applied to join the eurozone on 1 January 2008. The final decision was expected to be taken in Brussels on 21–22 June at an EU Summit to be ratified by all EU heads of state.[6]

On 9 March 2007, the campaign to inform the citizens of Cyprus about the euro officially began in Cypriot media.

On 15 March 2007, the House of Representatives passed the necessary laws for the introduction of the euro on 1 January 2008.

On 16 May 2007, the Commissioner for Economic & Financial Affairs of the EU, Joaquín Almunia, recommended that Cyprus adopt the euro as scheduled.

On 20 June 2007, the European Parliament voted affirmatively on this issue and on 21 June 2007, the date was confirmed by the EU leaders.

On 10 July 2007, the EU Finance Ministers set the permanent exchange rate to CYP 0.585274 to 1 euro.

On 23 October 2007, the designs were officially published in the Official Journal of the European Union.[7]

On 1 January 2008, the euro replaced the Cypriot pound as the official currency.

Other commemorative coins (Collectors' coins)

Although Cyprus joined the Eurozone in 2008, they already had one high value commemorative coin, minted in silver. This coin was minted as a legacy of an old national practice of minting gold and silver coins. This coin is not really intended to be used as means of payment, so generally they do not circulate.

Accession of Cyprus to the euro area re

Silver, 5 euro, Cyprus joins the Eurozone (2008).

References

  1. ^ "National Euro Website: progress achieved, most important dates". Archived from the original on 2007-01-05.
  2. ^ "Mintage quantities of the euro coins". Euro-Coins.Info. Retrieved 2018-11-13.
  3. ^ a b [1]
  4. ^ "Revised Announcement for the Competition for the Selection of the Design of the National Sides of the Euro Coins". Central bank of Cyprus.
  5. ^ ""From the £ to the €" Exhibition". Central bank of Cyprus.
  6. ^ "Cyprus files formal application to join the eurozone". Financial Mirror. 2007-02-13. Archived from the original on December 13, 2007. Retrieved 2007-02-13.
  7. ^ http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/site/en/oj/2007/c_248/c_24820071023en00080009.pdf

External links

10 euro cent coin

The 10 euro cent coin (€0.10) has a value of one tenth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called Nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

1 euro cent coin

The 1 euro cent coin (€0.01) has a value of one hundredth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. The coins of every Euro country have a common reverse and each has a country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

1 euro coin

The 1-euro coin (€1) is a euro coin with a value of one euro (€1). It is made of two alloys: the inner part of cupronickel, the outer part of nickel brass. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

As of July 2015, there were approximately 6.7 billion one-euro coins in circulation, constituting 26.4% of all circulated euro coins by value and 5.9% by quantity.

20 euro cent coin

The 20 euro cent coin (€0.20) has a value of one fifth of a euro and is composed of an alloy called nordic gold in the Spanish flower shape. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

2 euro cent coin

The 2 euro cent coin (€0.02) has a value of one-fiftieth of a euro and is composed of copper-plated steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not redesigned in 2007 as were the higher-value coins.

2 euro coin

The 2 euro coin (€2) is the highest value euro coin and has been used since the introduction of the euro (in its cash form) in 2002. The coin is used in 22 countries (with 20 legally adopting it) with a collective population of about 341 million. The coin is made of two alloys: the inner part of nickel brass, the outer part of copper-nickel. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

The €2 coin is the coin subject to legal-tender commemorative issues and hence there is a large number of national sides, including three issues of identical commemorative sides by all eurozone members.

50 euro cent coin

The 50 euro cent coin (€0.50) has a value of half a euro and are composed of an alloy called nordic gold. All coins have a common reverse side and country-specific national sides. The coin has been used since 2002, with the present common side design dating from 2007.

5 euro cent coin

The 5 euro cent coin (€0.05) has a value of one twentieth of a euro and is composed of copper-covered steel. All coins have a common reverse and country-specific (national) obverse. The coin has been used since 2002 and was not re-designed in 2007 as was the case with the higher-value coins.

Coins of the Cypriot pound

The coins of the Cypriot pound are part of the physical form of former Cypriot currency, the Cypriot pound. They have been issued since coming under British rule in 1878, until Cyprus' adoption of Euro in 2008.

Cypriot pound

The pound, also known as the lira (Greek: λίρα / plural λίρες and Turkish: lira, from the Latin libra through the Italian lira), was the currency of Cyprus, including the Sovereign Base Areas in Akrotiri and Dhekelia, until 31 December 2007, when the Republic of Cyprus adopted the euro. However, the self-proclaimed Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus used and still uses on the official level the Turkish lira.

The Cypriot pound was replaced by the euro as official currency of the Republic of Cyprus on 1 January 2008 at the irrevocable fixed exchange rate of CYP 0.585274 per EUR 1.00.

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins (Cyprus)

Euro gold and silver commemorative coins are special euro coins minted and issued by member states of the Eurozone, mainly in gold and silver, although other precious metals are also used in rare occasions. Cyprus introduced the euro (€) on 1 January 2008. In 2000, in such a short time, the Central Bank of Cyprus has produced the first commemorative euro coin in silver. In 2010 the Central Bank of Cyprus has produced 2 more commemorative euro coin in gold and silver.

These special coins has a legal tender only in Cyprus, unlike the normal issues of the Cypriot euro coins, which have a legal tender in every country of the Eurozone. This means that the commemorative coins made of gold and silver cannot be used as money in other countries. Furthermore, as their bullion value generally vastly exceeds their face value, these coins are not intended to be used as means of payment at all—although it remains possible. For this reason, they are usually named Collectors' coins.

The coins usually commemorate the anniversaries of historical events or draw attention to current events of special importance.

Euro starter kits

Euro starter kits are packs of euro coins of all the eight denominations sealed in a plastic bag. The scope of these kits is primarily to familiarise the citizens of a nation that is going to join the eurozone with the new currency, the euro. Another objective is to fill up cash registers well in advance of €-Day. Usually these kits are available from the local banks some weeks before the euro changeover.Mainly there are two types of starter packs: business starter kits and kits for the general public. The difference is in the number of coins per pack. Business kits are intended for retailers, thereby they contain around 100 euro or more of coins and are normally contained in rolls, whereas the mini-starter kits are intended for the general public and usually have a small volume of coins.

Idol of Pomos

The Idol of Pomos, is a prehistoric sculpture from the Cypriot village of Pomos.

It dates back to the Chalcolithic period, circa the 30th century BC.The sculpture is on display in the Cyprus Archeological Museum in Lefkosia (Nicosia).

Index of Cyprus-related articles

This page list topics related to Cyprus.

Kyrenia ship

The Kyrenia ship is the wreck of a 4th-century BC Greek merchant ship. It was discovered by Greek-Cypriot diving instructor Andreas Cariolou in November 1965 during a storm. Having lost the exact position Cariolou carried out more than 200 dives until he re-discovered the wreck in 1967 with the help of James Husband close to Kyrenia in Cyprus. Michael Katzev, a graduate student at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, directed a salvage expedition from 1967-69. Preservation of the ship's timbers continued during the winter of 1970. Katzev later was a co-founder of the Institute of Nautical Archaeology. The find was extensively covered in a documentary by the BBC. The ship was considered to be very well preserved with approximately 75% of it in good condition. It found a new home at the Ancient Shipwreck Museum in Kyrenia Castle, where it remains on exhibit.

List of euro mints

Several euro mints exist in the eurozone. Not every eurozone member state has its own mint to produce euro coins.

Mincovňa Kremnica, Slovakia

Slovak euro coins

Staatliche Münzen Baden-Württemberg

German euro coins

Latvian euro coins

Suomen Rahapaja (Mint of Finland)

Estonian euro coins

Greek euro coins

Luxembourgish euro coins

Slovenian euro coins

Cypriot euro coins

Irish euro coins

Istituto Poligrafico e Zecca dello Stato

Vatican euro coins

Mouflon

The mouflon (Ovis orientalis orientalis group) is a subspecies group of the wild sheep (Ovis orientalis). Populations of O. orientalis can be partitioned into the mouflons (orientalis group) and the urials (vignei group). The mouflon is thought to be the ancestor for all modern domestic sheep breeds.

Northern Cyprus and the European Union

Turkish Cypriots and the European Union have somewhat strained relations because the European Union (EU) does not recognise the self-declared Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus.

Outline of Cyprus

The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to Cyprus:

Cyprus – Eurasian island country located in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, east of Greece, south of Turkey, west of Syria and Lebanon, northwest of Israel and north of Egypt. Cyprus is the third largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and the Republic of Cyprus is a member state of the European Union.

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