Curt Blefary

Curtis Leroy "Clank" Blefary (July 5, 1943 – January 28, 2001) was an American professional baseball left fielder who played in Major League Baseball for the Baltimore Orioles (1965–1968), Houston Astros (1969), New York Yankees (1970–1971), Oakland Athletics (1971–1972) and the San Diego Padres (1972). A native of Brooklyn, New York, he batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

Curt Blefary
Curt Blefary 1970
Blefary in 1970
Outfielder / First baseman
Born: July 5, 1943
Brooklyn, New York
Died: January 28, 2001 (aged 57)
Pompano Beach, Florida
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 14, 1965, for the Baltimore Orioles
Last MLB appearance
October 4, 1972, for the San Diego Padres
MLB statistics
Batting average.237
Home runs112
Runs batted in382
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Career

Blefary grew up in Mahwah, New Jersey and attended Mahwah High School.[1][2]

In an eight-season career, Blefary was a .237 hitter with 112 home runs and 382 RBI in 974 games.

In his debut year of 1965, Blefary hit .260 with 22 home runs and 70 RBI, winning both the American League Rookie of the Year and The Sporting News Rookie of the Year awards. The following season, he was a member of the Orioles team that won the 1966 World Series.

Curt Blefary 1967
Blefary in 1967

Nicknamed "Clank" by Frank Robinson, in part for his below-average fielding abilities, Blefary started his career in the outfield, tried at first base, then switched to catcher, in an effort to keep his bat in the lineup. On April 27, 1968, he caught Tom Phoebus's no-hitter against the Red Sox.[3] Blaming his constant defensive shuffling for his offensive decline, Blefary was sent to Houston in 1969 in the deal that brought Mike Cuellar to the Orioles.

On May 4, 1969, Blefary, who was playing first base participated in all of the Astros record-tying seven double plays in a game against the San Francisco Giants.

After a full season with the Astros, at the end of the 1969 season he was traded to the Yankees for fellow Brooklynite, Joe Pepitone.

Blefary was used as a part-time player by the Yankees, and in 1971 he was traded to the Athletics and in 1972 to the Padres. After retiring in 1972, he tried unsuccessfully to continue his career in baseball as a coach. He worked as a sheriff, bartender, truck driver, and later owned a night club. Even as his health failed in his later years, he hoped to secure a professional coaching job, but his only connection with baseball was as a volunteer coach for Northeast High School in Fort Lauderdale.

Later life

In the last years of his life, Blefary suffered from chronic pancreatitis. He had hip replacement surgery in the mid-1990s and experienced a variety of health and financial problems, including alcoholism and depression.[4] Blefary died at his home in Pompano Beach, Florida on January 28, 2001, at the age of 57 of chronic pancreatitis and other related ailments. His last wish was to be buried in Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. Although the park was nearly demolished when he died, his wife Lana was able to honor his request to scatter his ashes in Memorial Stadium. The Babe Ruth Museum supplied the home plate used in the penultimate game at the stadium and located it in the precise spot where it had been used. The ceremony was held on May 24, 2001. "He loved Baltimore, and he loved his fans," said his wife. "He was a lifelong student of the game."

References

  1. ^ Goldstein, Richard. "Curt Blefary, 57, Outfielder And A.L. Rookie of the Year", The New York Times, January 30, 2011. Accessed May 16, 2016. "A native of Brooklyn, Blefary was a high school baseball and football star in Mahwah, N.J., and signed with the Yankees in 1962 for a reported $40,000 out of Wagner College on Staten Island."
  2. ^ Henshell, John. Curt Blefary biography page, Society for American Baseball Research. Accessed May 16, 2016.
  3. ^ http://www.retrosheet.org/boxesetc/1968/B04270BAL1968.htm
  4. ^ Jennifer Frey (February 26, 1995). "Baseball; 'I've Walked in Their Shoes'". The New York Times.

External links

1963 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1963 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing fourth in the American League with a record of 86 wins and 76 losses.

1963 New York Yankees season

The 1963 New York Yankees season was the 61st season for the team in New York, and its 63rd season overall. The team finished with a record of 104–57, winning their 28th pennant, finishing 10½ games ahead of the Chicago White Sox. New York was managed by Ralph Houk.

The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the World Series, they were defeated by the Los Angeles Dodgers in 4 games, the first time the Yankees had ever been swept in the World Series (they had lost 4 games to none with one tied game in 1922).

1965 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1965 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing 3rd in the American League with a record of 94 wins and 68 losses.

1965 Major League Baseball season

In the 1965 Major League Baseball season which was contested from April 12 to October 14, 1965, the Houston Colt .45s became the Astros, as they moved from Colt Stadium to the new Astrodome, becoming the first team to play their home games indoors, rather than outdoors. It was also the final season for the Braves in Milwaukee, before relocating to Atlanta for the 1966 season. The Los Angeles Angels officially changed their name to California Angels on September 2, 1965 with only 28 games left in the season in advance of their pending 1966 move to a new stadium in Anaheim.

In the World Series, the Dodgers beat the Minnesota Twins in seven games.

1965 in baseball

The following are the baseball events of the year 1965 throughout the world.

1966 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1966 Baltimore Orioles season involved the Orioles finishing first in the American League with a record of 97 wins and 63 losses, nine games ahead of the runner-up Minnesota Twins. It was their first AL pennant since 1944, when the club was known as the St. Louis Browns. The Orioles swept the NL champion Los Angeles Dodgers in four games to register their first-ever World Series title. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium. They drew 1,203,366 fans to their home ballpark, third in the ten-team league. It would be the highest home attendance of the team's first quarter-century at Memorial Stadium, and was eclipsed by the pennant-winning 1979 Orioles.

1967 Baltimore Orioles season

After winning the World Series the previous year, the 1967 Baltimore Orioles plummeted to a sixth-place finish in the American League with a record of 76 wins and 85 losses, 15½ games behind the AL champion Boston Red Sox. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, and played their home games at Memorial Stadium.

1968 Baltimore Orioles season

The 1968 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. The team finished second in the American League with a record of 91 wins and 71 losses, 12 games behind the AL and World Series champion Detroit Tigers. The team was managed by Hank Bauer, until he was replaced right after the All-Star break by Earl Weaver. The Orioles' home games were played at Memorial Stadium.

Following the season, it was announced that the American League, along with the National League, would be split into two divisions for the 1969 season in order to accommodate the admittance of two new franchises to each league. The Orioles were assigned to the new American League East division.

1969 Houston Astros season

The 1969 Houston Astros season was a season in American baseball. The team finished in fifth place in the newly established National League West with a record of 81–81, twelve games behind the Atlanta Braves. It was also the first time in their history that the Astros did not finish below .500.

1970 New York Yankees season

The 1970 New York Yankees season was the 68th season for the franchise in New York, and its 70th season overall. The team finished in second place in the American League East with a record of 93–69, 15 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. The 93 wins were the most for the Yankees since 1964. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

Yankees had the lowest payroll in MLB from 1943 till 1993

1971 New York Yankees season

The 1971 New York Yankees season was the 69th season for the franchise in New York, and its 71st season overall. The team finished fourth in the American League East with a record of 82–80, 21 games behind the Baltimore Orioles. New York was managed by Ralph Houk. The Yankees played their home games at Yankee Stadium.

1971 Oakland Athletics season

The 1971 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's finishing first in the American League West with a record of 101 wins and 60 losses. In their first postseason appearance of any kind since 1931, the A's were swept in three games by the Baltimore Orioles in the American League Championship Series.

1972 Oakland Athletics season

The 1972 Oakland Athletics season involved the A's winning the American League West with a record of 93 wins and 62 losses. In the playoffs, they defeated the Detroit Tigers in a five-game ALCS, followed by a seven-game World Series, in which they defeated the Cincinnati Reds for their first World Championship since 1930, when the club was in Philadelphia.

1972 San Diego Padres season

The 1972 San Diego Padres season was the fourth season in franchise history.

1973 Atlanta Braves season

The 1973 Atlanta Braves season was the eighth season in Atlanta along with the 103rd season as a franchise overall. The highlight of the season was Hank Aaron finishing the season just one home run short of Babe Ruth as baseball's all-time home run king. The 1973 Atlanta Braves were the first team to boast three 40 home run hitters. They were Aaron, Darrell Evans, and Davey Johnson.

1973 San Diego Padres season

The 1973 San Diego Padres season was the fifth season in franchise history.

Clank

Clank may refer to:

Clank (Ratchet & Clank), major character in the Ratchet & Clank video game series for PlayStations 2, 3, and 4

Antonov An-30, airplane with the NATO reporting name "Clank"

Curt Blefary (1943–2001), Baltimore Orioles baseball player nicknamed "Clank"

Clank, an onomatopoeia meaning a metallic knocking sound

A steampunk robot, in the webcomic Girl Genius

Clank, Illinois, a community in the United States

Mahwah High School

Mahwah High School (MHS) is a four-year comprehensive public high school serving students from Mahwah, Bergen County, New Jersey, serving students in ninth through twelfth grades as the only secondary school of the Mahwah Township Public Schools. The school is accredited by the New Jersey Department of Education and has been accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Secondary Schools since 1962.As of the 2015-16 school year, the school had an enrollment of 918 students and 92.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.9:1. There were 76 students (8.3% of enrollment) eligible for free lunch and 35 (3.8% of students) eligible for reduced-cost lunch.

Tom Phoebus

Thomas Harold Phoebus (born April 7, 1942) is an American former Major League Baseball pitcher with the Baltimore Orioles, San Diego Padres and the Chicago Cubs between 1966 and 1972. He batted and threw right-handed.

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