Curley Culp

Curley Culp (born March 10, 1946) is a former professional American football player. An offensive and defensive lineman, he played college football at Arizona State University, was the NCAA heavyweight wrestling champion while at ASU, and played professionally in the American Football League for the Kansas City Chiefs in 1968 and 1969, and for the National Football League Chiefs, Houston Oilers, and the Detroit Lions. He was an AFL All-Star in 1969 and a six-time AFCNFC Pro Bowler.

On Saturday, August 3, 2013, Culp was enshrined into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.[1]

Curley Culp
refer to caption
Culp playing with the Chiefs in Super Bowl IV
No. 61, 78, 77
Position:Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:March 10, 1946 (age 73)
Yuma, Arizona
Career information
High school:Yuma (AZ)
College:Arizona State
NFL Draft:1968 / Round: 2 / Pick: 31
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:68
Forced fumbles:14
Fumble recoveries:10
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Collegiate career

Culp played at Arizona State University under legendary coach Frank Kush. He played both offensive and defensive tackle. He was drafted in the second round of the 1968 NFL Draft by the Denver Broncos.

Professional career

Kansas City Chiefs

At 6'1" and 265 lbs, Culp was considered a bit too short for the defensive line and a bit too slow to play linebacker. He moved from Denver to Kansas City in search of a team that could properly utilize his unique talents. Culp's play as a nose tackle actually took root in Super Bowl IV. Chiefs coach, Hank Stram, in an attempt to nullify the Minnesota Vikings' quick outside rushing attack, decided to line Culp directly nose-to-nose with Vikings center, Mick Tingelhoff. The smaller Tingelhoff could not block Culp one-on-one and had to be helped by the other linemen. This freed teammates, Buck Buchanan, Willie Lanier, and other Chiefs defenders to get into the Vikings offensive backfield and shut down their running game. The effectiveness of the Chiefs' defensive game plan helped continue the growing popularity of the 3-4 scheme in the 1970s from the college to pro ranks.

1986 Jeno's Pizza - 50 - Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp
Culp (right) stopping a Vikings running play during Super Bowl IV.

"Curley Culp was a tremendous athlete," Pro Football Hall of Fame QB, Len Dawson, said. "He had such strength and quickness. I remember Jack Rudnay used to say that every center in the league should have to go against Curley in order to know what it's like to go against the very best."

Culp helped anchor the Kansas City defensive line. Culp spent seven seasons in Kansas City (1968–1974). He was a starting defensive tackle on the Chiefs Super Bowl IV squad and appeared in 82 games with Kansas City. A member of the Chiefs 25-Year All-Time Team, Culp played in the 1969 AFL All-Star Game and the 1971 Pro Bowl. He was twice honored as the Associated Press Defensive Player of the Week and claimed the Chiefs unofficial sack crown in 1973 with nine QB takedowns. Culp also registered five fumble recoveries in his Kansas City career.

Houston Oilers and Detroit Lions

When Culp arrived in Houston, Bum Phillips was the defensive coordinator for Sid Gillman at the time. He had convinced the head coach to try a 3-4 defense, employing three down linemen and four linebackers, eschewing the standard 4-3 fronts of the day. In basically an exchange of defensive tackles who had threatened to jump to the World Football League, the Oilers acquired Culp and a first-round draft choice in 1975 from the Chiefs for John Matuszak on October 22, 1974. Both Culp and Matuszak had signed contracts with the Southern California Sun and Shreveport Steamer respectively.[2] It eventually became one of the most lopsided trades in NFL history, which was made worse for the Chiefs when the Oilers selected Robert Brazile with the draft pick.[3]

Culp was so strong he required two and three players to block him, opening lanes for Elvin Bethea, Gregg Bingham, Ted Washington, Sr. and later Brazile. Houston won seven of their remaining nine games after Curley came to Houston. As Phillips later said, "Curley made (the 3-4 defense) work. He made me look smart."

Culp's finest season came in 1975. He notched 11½ sacks, a high total for a nose tackle. He won All-Pro honors and was chosen NFL Defensive Player of the Year by the Newspaper Enterprise Association and as such received the George S. Halas Trophy.

The nose tackle position would become notorious for shortening careers. As linemen attacked Curley from every angle, injuries and age began to take their toll. Midway through the 1980 season, Culp was released and was claimed by Detroit, where he stayed an additional season, before closing out his 14-year NFL career.

So great was his impact that the Sporting News named Culp to the All-Century teams of both the Kansas City and Houston/Tennessee franchises. Or more to the point, as voiced by Hall-Of-Famer center, Jim Otto of the Raiders, "Curley Culp was perhaps the strongest man I ever lined up against."

Houston Highlight: In a September 1975 game against the San Diego Chargers, Culp scooped up a Charger fumble and rumbled 38 yards. Even though teammate Elvin Bethea yelled that Curley was going the wrong way, he managed to find the correct end zone for the only points of his NFL career. The score helped Houston beat San Diego, 33-17, and secured the Oilers' first 2-0 start since 1966. Houston finished the 1975 season with a 10-4 record.

Collegiate Wrestling

Curley Culp was the heavyweight champion, and won the Gorriaran Award for scoring the most falls at the 1967 NCAA Division I championships.[4]

Legacy

In March 2008 Kansas City Chiefs Chairman, Clark Hunt, decided that former DT Curley Culp would be the 2008 inductee into the Chiefs Hall of Fame. The 38th member of this prestigious group, Culp was enshrined into the Chiefs Hall of Fame at halftime of the Chiefs Alumni Game that fall. Culp played a total of 13 seasons in the AFL/NFL with Kansas City, Houston, and Detroit, and was selected to a total of six AFL All-Star Games or Pro Bowls.

On August 22, 2012, Culp was named as a senior nominee for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2013.[5] On February 2, 2013, Culp was selected as one of seven inductees into the 2013 Hall of Fame class.[6] On August 3, 2013, Culp was officially inducted at the Enshrinement Ceremony where his bust, sculpted by Scott Myers, was unveiled.

See also

References

  1. ^ Corbett, Jim (February 2, 2013). "Parcells, Carter finally make Pro Football Hall of Fame". USA Today. Retrieved 2 February 2013.
  2. ^ "Packers Get Hadl," The New York Times, Wednesday, October 23, 1974. Retrieved December 6, 2018
  3. ^ Covitz, Randy. "Former Chiefs great Curley Culp muscles his way into the Hall of Fame," The Kansas City (MO) Star, Friday, August 2, 2013. Retrieved December 6, 2018
  4. ^ "37th NCAA Wrestling Tournament" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  5. ^ "Culp and Robinson named 2013 senior nominees". Pro Football Hall of Fame. August 22, 2011. Retrieved 2012-08-22.
  6. ^ Gregg Rosenthal (February 2, 2013). "Warren Sapp among seven voted into Hall of Fame". Around the League. NFL.com. Retrieved February 2, 2013.
1966 Arizona State Sun Devils football team

The 1966 Arizona State Sun Devils football team was an American football team that represented Arizona State University in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1966 college football season. In their ninth season under head coach Frank Kush, the Sun Devils compiled a 5–5 record (3–2 against WAC opponents), finished in a tie for second place in the WAC, and were outscored by their opponents by a combined total of 174 to 166.The team's statistical leaders included John Goodman with 1,259 passing yards, Travis Williams with 551 rushing yards, and Ken Dyer with 496 receiving yards.Don Baker, Bill Kajikawa, Paul Kemp, Larry Kentera, Jack Stovall, and Dick Tamburo were assistant coaches. The team captains were offensive tackle Ray Shirey and defensive end Steve Timarac. The Sun Devils finished 3–3 at home and 2–2 on the road. All home games were played at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona.

1967 Arizona State Sun Devils football team

The 1967 Arizona State Sun Devils football team was an American football team that represented Arizona State University in the Western Athletic Conference (WAC) during the 1967 college football season. In their tenth season under head coach Frank Kush, the Sun Devils compiled an 8–2 record (4–1 against WAC opponents), finished in second place in the WAC, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 350 to 210.The team's statistical leaders included Ed Roseborough with 1,494 passing yards, Max Anderson with 1,188 rushing yards, and Ken Dyer with 654 receiving yards.Don Baker, Bill Kajikawa, Larry Kentera, Chuck McBride, Bob Owens, and Jerry Thompson were assistant coaches. Fullback Max Anderson and middle guard Curley Culp were the team captains. The Sun Devils finished 4-2 at home and 4-0 on the road. All home games were played at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona.

1967 NCAA University Division Wrestling Championships

The 1967 NCAA University Division Wrestling Championships were the 37th NCAA University Division Wrestling Championships to be held. Kent State University in Kent, Ohio hosted the tournament at Memorial Gym.

Michigan State took home the team championship with 74 points and having two individual champions.Rick Sanders of Portland State was named the Most Outstanding Wrestler and Curley Culp of Arizona State received the Gorriaran Award.

1969 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1969 Kansas City Chiefs season was the team's 10th, their 7th in Kansas City, and also their final season in the American Football League. It resulted in an 11–3 record and a 23–7 victory in Super Bowl IV over the NFL's heavily favored Minnesota Vikings. The team beat their rivals, the Oakland Raiders in the final AFL Championship Game, claiming their third AFL Championship in franchise history. The Chiefs were coached by Hank Stram, led by quarterback Len Dawson and a powerful defense led by Bobby Bell, Willie Lanier, Buck Buchanan, Emmitt Thomas, Johnny Robinson and Curley Culp. The Chiefs' defense became the fourth defense in the history of pro football to lead its league in fewest rushing yards, fewest passing yards and fewest total yards. The Chiefs were the second AFL team to win the Super Bowl and last AFL team to do so before the AFL-NFL Merger in the following season.

The season was marred not only by an injury to quarterback Len Dawson but also controversy surrounding Dawson and his purported involvement in a sports gambling ring. Back-up quarterback Mike Livingston and the Chiefs' stellar defense led the Chiefs back to the Super Bowl, this time, to win it all.

Along with owner Lamar Hunt, nine future Hall of Famers were members of the 1969 Chiefs, including QB Len Dawson, LBs Willie Lanier and Bobby Bell, DT Buck Buchanan, DT Curley Culp, CB Emmitt Thomas, S Johnny Robinson, K Jan Stenerud, and Coach Hank Stram.

In 2006, the 1969 Kansas City Chiefs were ranked as the 18th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions.In 2007, ESPN.com ranked the 1969 Chiefs as the seventh-greatest defense in NFL history, noting "Hank Stram's 'Triple Stack' defense, which gave the linebackers lots of room to roam, was superb, holding five opponents to fewer than 10 points and giving up an average of less than two touchdowns a game.... Then they got serious. Against the [defending] Super Bowl champion Jets in the AFL divisional playoff game at Shea Stadium, the Chiefs held on for a 13–6 victory, thanks to a remarkable three-play goal line stand that stifled the Jets on the one. After losing twice to the Raiders during the regular season, the Chiefs allowed a single touchdown, in the first quarter, to win the AFL title over Oakland 17–7. The Chiefs defense then stifled the Vikings in the Super Bowl, allowing only two rushing first downs and picking off three passes in the fourth quarter to win 23–7. Total points against the Chiefs in the playoffs: 20." Kansas City is the only team in the Super Bowl era to win the title without allowing as much as 10 points in any postseason game.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1971 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1971 Kansas City Chiefs season was the franchise's 2nd season in the National Football League, the 9th as the Kansas City Chiefs, and the 12th overall. They improved from a 7–5–2 campaign in 1970 to record a 10–3–1 mark and win the AFC West division championship, the Chiefs' first division title since 1966. The Chiefs tied with the Miami Dolphins for the best record in the AFC and were tied for the third-best record overall in the NFL, trailing only the 11–3 marks of the Dallas Cowboys and Minnesota Vikings.

Most of the pieces of the team which won Super Bowl IV two years earlier were still in place. Left defensive end Jerry Mays retired after the 1970 season, with Marvin Upshaw taking his spot, but the other 10 defensive starters were the same as they were two years prior. Middle linebacker Willie Lanier was a unanimous All-Pro selection following the season, and would likely have been named NFL Defensive Player of the Year had not Viking defensive tackle Alan Page become the second defensive player to win the league's Most Valuable Player award. Outside linebacker Bobby Bell, defensive tackles Buck Buchanan and Curley Culp, and cornerback Emmitt Thomas joined Lanier on the AFC Pro Bowl squad following the season. Bell, Buchanan, Culp, Lanier, and Thomas are all members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

On offense, Robert Holmes was traded to the San Diego Chargers midway through the season, leaving Wendell Hayes to assume the fullback duties next to third-year pro Ed Podolak, who had become the starting halfback when Mike Garrett was traded to San Diego in 1970. Morris Stroud, the tallest player in NFL history at 6-foot-10, and Willie Frazier, acquired from San Diego, alternated at tight end for the retired Fred Arbanas, but the rest of the offensive line, save for center Jack Rudnay, remained the same from the Super Bowl winning team. Rudnay assumed the starting center spot in 1970 over veteran E. J. Holub. At wide receiver, rookie Elmo Wright, the Chiefs' first-round pick in the 1971 NFL Draft from the University of Houston, assumed the slot opposite all-pro Otis Taylor, as Frank Pitts had moved on to the Cleveland Browns. Taylor earned selection to the Pro Bowl, along with guard Ed Budde, quarterback Len Dawson, and tackle Jim Tyrer.

Kansas City's special teams remained among the league's elite units, thanks to the combination of kicker Jan Stenerud and punter Jerrel Wilson, both of whom were named to the Pro Bowl. Podolak and Warren McVea handled the bulk of the return duties.

The season was the last for the Chiefs in Municipal Stadium, as owner Lamar Hunt and general manager Jack Steadman were overseeing the construction of Arrowhead Stadium, located at the junction of Interstate 70 and Interstate 435 in Jackson County, Missouri, at the eastern edge of the Kansas City city limits. Arrowhead, along with Royals Stadium, being constructed for the Kansas City Royals of Major League Baseball, would form the Truman Sports Complex, bucking the trend of multi-purpose stadiums in vogue at the time.

The season ended in heartbreak, as the Miami Dolphins won the longest game in National Football League history on Christmas Day, defeating the Chiefs 27–24 in double-overtime on a 37-yard field goal by Garo Yepremian in the last football game in Municipal Stadium, as well as the last game for safety Johnny Robinson, who was an original member of the Dallas Texans in 1960. Coach Hank Stram often called the 1971 Chiefs the franchise's best-ever squad, and this loss haunted Stram for the rest of his life, even after his induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2003. Stram died July 4, 2005 at age 82. Others who are in the Hall of Fame from this squad are owner Hunt (who died December 13, 2006, at age 74), quarterback Dawson, and kicker Stenerud.

The loss to Miami began a nosedive in the Chiefs' fortunes. Kansas City backslid to 8–6 and 7–5–2 in 1972 and 1973, before falling to 5–9 and a tie for last in the AFC West in 1974, leading to the Stram's firing following the season. Kansas City would not reach the playoffs again until 1986, did not host (or win) another playoff game until 1991, and did not win the AFC West division title again until 1993.

1974 Houston Oilers season

The 1974 Houston Oilers season was the 15th season overall and fifth with the National Football League. The team improved upon their previous season's output of 1–13, winning seven games. Despite the improvement, they failed to qualify for the playoffs for the fifth consecutive season.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1976 Houston Oilers season

The 1976 Houston Oilers season was the 17th season overall and seventh with the National Football League (NFL). The team started the season 4–1 with their only loss coming by a single point to the eventual Super Bowl champion Oakland Raiders. However, they won only one more game, finishing the year 5–9, while failing to qualify for the playoffs for the seventh consecutive season.

1977 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1977. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1977.

1977 Houston Oilers season

The 1977 Houston Oilers season was the 18th season overall and eighth with the National Football League (NFL). The Oilers won three of their first four games, which was capped by a 27-10 win over the Pittsburgh Steelers in the Astrodome. However, injuries would hamper the Oilers chances as they lost five of their next six games. The team improved upon their previous season's output of 5–9, winning eight games, but failed to qualify for the playoffs for the eighth consecutive season.

1978 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1978. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League.

1979 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1979. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that were included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1979.

Culp

Culp is a surname. Notable people bearing it include:

Arlie F. Culp (born 1926), American politician

Benny Culp (1914–2000), American baseball player

Connie Culp (born 1963), the first United States recipient of a face transplant

Curley Culp (born 1963), American football player

Dennis Culp (born 1970), American trombonist, singer, and songwriter

Faye B. Culp (born 1939), American politician

Jonathan Culp (born 1971), Canadian underground filmmaker

Julia Culp (1880–1970), Dutch mezzo-soprano

Oveta Culp Hobby (1905–1995), U.S. public official and newspaper publisher

Ray Culp (born 1941), American baseball player

Robert Culp (1930–2010), American actor

Steven Culp (born 1955), American actor

John Matuszak

John Daniel Matuszak (October 25, 1950 – June 17, 1989) was an American football defensive end in the National Football League who later became an actor.

He was the first overall pick in the 1973 NFL Draft and played most of his career with the Oakland Raiders until he retired after winning his second Super Bowl in 1981. Matuszak participated in the 1978 World's Strongest Man competition, where he placed ninth. As an actor, he played in both films and television, appearing first as O.W. Shaddock in 1979 in North Dallas Forty followed by Tonda in the 1981 film Caveman. His best known role was as the deformed Sloth in the 1985 movie The Goonies. His biography, Cruisin' with the Tooz, written with Steve Delsohn, was published in 1987.

He died in 1989 of an accidental propoxyphene overdose.

List of Kansas City Chiefs players

This is a select list of players from the Kansas City Chiefs football team from the National Football League.

For more information, see Kansas City Chiefs.

Scott Myers

Scott Myers (born 1958, USA) is an American painter and sculptor who lives and works in Texas. He graduated Texas A&M University in 1984 with a doctorate in veterinary medicine. He studied sculpture throughout Italy focusing on Florence, Venice and Rome. Sculpting in Tuscany, he cast his work in bronze at the prestigious Fonderia d'Arte Massimo Del Chiaro in Pietrasanta. In 1994, Myers became an elected member of the National Sculpture Society. On February 12, 2011, Myers was featured in the popular television show Texas Country Reporter. Myers was inducted in the inaugural class of the Haltom City High School Hall of Fame on March 10, 2011.Myers is best known for sculpting busts for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Chris Doleman, Chris Hanburger, Rickey Jackson, Russ Grimm, Bob Hayes, Randall McDaniel, Fred Dean, Emmitt Thomas, Bruce Matthews, Rayfield Wright, Elvin Bethea, Curley Culp, Claude Humphrey, Charles Haley and Kevin Greene.Myers' paintings focus mostly on ranch life and western landscapes, with horses and cowboys figuring prominently in his subject matter. His paintings combine bold color with a Monet-like layering of color and texture that makes him unique in the western art genre.

Super Bowl IV

Super Bowl IV, the fourth and final AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professional American football, was played on January 11, 1970, at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. The American Football League (AFL) champion Kansas City Chiefs defeated the National Football League (NFL) champion Minnesota Vikings by the score of 23–7. This victory by the AFL squared the Super Bowl series with the NFL at two games apiece. The two leagues merged into one after the game.

Despite the AFL's New York Jets winning the previous season's Super Bowl, many sports writers and fans thought it was a fluke and continued to believe that the NFL was still superior to the AFL, and thus fully expected the Vikings to defeat the Chiefs; the Vikings entered the Super Bowl as 12.5 to 13-point favorites. Minnesota posted a 12–2 record during the 1969 NFL season before defeating the Cleveland Browns, 27–7, in the 1969 NFL Championship Game. The Chiefs, who previously appeared in the first Super Bowl, finished the 1969 AFL season at 11–3, and defeated the Oakland Raiders, 17–7, in the 1969 AFL Championship Game.

Under wet conditions, the Chiefs defense dominated Super Bowl IV by limiting the Minnesota offense to only 67 rushing yards, forcing three interceptions, and recovering two fumbles. Kansas City's Len Dawson became the fourth consecutive winning quarterback to be named Super Bowl MVP. He completed 12 of 17 passes for 142 yards and one touchdown, with one interception. Dawson also recorded three rushing attempts for 11 yards.

Super Bowl IV is also notable for NFL Films miking up the Chiefs' Hank Stram during the game, the first time that a head coach had worn a microphone during a Super Bowl.

Yuma Union High School

Yuma High School (often referred to simply as Yuma High) is the oldest high school in Yuma, Arizona.

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