Cumberland County, Maine

Cumberland County is a county in the U.S. state of Maine. As of the 2010 census, the population was 281,674,[1] making it the most populous county in Maine. Its county seat is Portland.[2] Cumberland County was founded in 1760 from a portion of York County, Massachusetts and named for William, Duke of Cumberland, a son of King George II.[3]

Cumberland County has the deepest and second largest body of water in the state, Sebago Lake, which supplies tap water to most of the county. The county is the state's economic and industrial center, having the resources of the Port of Portland, the Maine Mall, and having corporate headquarters of major companies such as Fairchild Semiconductor, IDEXX Laboratories, Unum, and TD Bank.

Cumberland County is part of the Portland–South Portland, ME Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Cumberland County, Maine
Cumberland County Courthouse 5
Cumberland County Courthouse in Portland
Seal of Cumberland County, Maine

Seal
Map of Maine highlighting Cumberland County

Location within the U.S. state of Maine
Map of the United States highlighting Maine

Maine's location within the U.S.
FoundedNovember 1, 1760
Named forPrince William, Duke of Cumberland
SeatPortland
Largest cityPortland
Area
 • Total1,217 sq mi (3,152 km2)
 • Land835 sq mi (2,163 km2)
 • Water382 sq mi (989 km2), 31%
Population (est.)
 • (2016)292,041
 • Density337/sq mi (130/km2)
Congressional district1st
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.cumberlandcounty.org

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,217 square miles (3,150 km2), of which 835 square miles (2,160 km2) is land and 382 square miles (990 km2) (31%) is water.[4]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

National protected area

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179025,530
180038,20849.7%
181042,83112.1%
182049,44515.4%
183060,10221.6%
184068,65814.2%
185079,53815.8%
186075,591−5.0%
187082,0218.5%
188086,3595.3%
189090,9495.3%
1900100,68910.7%
1910112,01411.2%
1920124,37611.0%
1930134,6458.3%
1940146,0008.4%
1950169,20115.9%
1960182,7518.0%
1970192,5285.3%
1980215,78912.1%
1990243,13512.7%
2000265,6129.2%
2010281,6746.0%
Est. 2016292,041[5]3.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790–1960[7] 1900–1990[8]
1990–2000[9] 2010–2016[1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 265,612 people, 107,989 households, and 67,709 families residing in the county. The population density was 318 people per square mile (123/km²). There were 122,600 housing units at an average density of 147 per square mile (57/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.74% White, 1.06% Black or African American, 0.29% Native American, 1.40% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.35% from other races, and 1.13% from two or more races. 0.95% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 107,989 households out of which 30.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.10% were married couples living together, 9.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.30% were non-families. 28.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 2.95.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.30% under the age of 18, 8.40% from 18 to 24, 31.30% from 25 to 44, 23.60% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,048, and the median income for a family was $54,485. Males had a median income of $35,850 versus $27,935 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,949. About 5.20% of families and 7.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.10% of those under age 18 and 7.40% of those age 65 or over.

19.6% were of English, 15.5% Irish, 9.6% French, 7.8% United States or American, 7.7% Italian, 6.3% French Canadian and 5.9% German ancestry according to Census 2000. Most of those claiming to be of "American" ancestry are actually of English descent, but have family that has been in the country for so long, in many cases since the early seventeenth century that they choose to identify simply as "American".[10][11][12][13][14] 94.4% spoke English and 2.1% French as their first language.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 281,674 people, 117,339 households, and 70,778 families residing in the county.[15] The population density was 337.2 inhabitants per square mile (130.2/km2). There were 138,657 housing units at an average density of 166.0 per square mile (64.1/km2).[16] The racial makeup of the county was 92.8% white, 2.4% black or African American, 2.0% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 0.6% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.8% of the population.[15] In terms of ancestry, 22.7% were English, 21.1% were Irish, 9.0% were German, 8.4% were Italian, 6.0% were Scottish, 5.5% were French Canadian, and 4.4% were American.[17]

Of the 117,339 households, 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 9.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.7% were non-families, and 29.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.90. The median age was 41.0 years.[15]

The median income for a household in the county was $55,658 and the median income for a family was $71,335. Males had a median income of $48,158 versus $38,539 for females. The per capita income for the county was $31,041. About 6.9% of families and 10.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.[18]

Government

Cumberland County is represented by county commissioners and the daily operations are run by a county manager. The county has several responsibilities, including running a Sheriff's department, the Cumberland County Jail, and a county court system. Cumberland County also has its own treasury department, emergency management agency and also has a district attorney office. The county also has a stake in the Cross Insurance Arena (formerly called the Cumberland County Civic Center), as well as programs in local economic development and tourism.

Cumberland County is divided into five districts of approximate equal population, each of which elects one county commissioner. The sheriff is elected countywide and runs the Cumberland County Sheriff's office and the Cumberland County Jail.

Politics

In 2012, the county voted 65% to legalize same-sex marriage.[19]

Voter registration

Voter registration and party enrollment as of June 10, 2014[20]
Party Total Voters Percentage
Democratic 78,567 36.64%
Unenrolled 74,853 35.23%
Republican 51,641 24.08%
Green Independent 9,317 4.34%
Total 214,378 100%

Due to it's urban nature (and fastly growing population) Cumberland county is Democratic party stronghold. In fact, the Democrats dominate voter registration in the county and have won every presidential election in a row since 1992.

Communities

Cities

Towns

Census-designated places

Other unincorporated communities

In popular culture

The fictional town of Jerusalem's Lot, featured in the vampire novel 'Salem's Lot by Stephen King, is situated in Cumberland County. King makes passing reference to other nearby towns and cities, including Portland, Falmouth, and Westbrook.

The video game Trauma Team takes place in Cumberland County in the year 2020, referencing Portland and Portland's Back Cove. Neither actual hospital housed in Portland is mentioned in-game; instead, a fictional trauma center called Resurgam First Care is fabricated for the plot (in real life, Portland's city motto is "Resurgam," Latin for "I will rise again"). Two other fictional places are mentioned that reference the county name: "Cumberland College" and "Cumberland Institute of Forensic Medicine".

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 18, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-04-27. Retrieved 2012-05-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 9, 2014. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 7, 2014.
  10. ^ Sharing the Dream: White Males in a Multicultural America By Dominic J. Pulera.
  11. ^ Reynolds Farley, 'The New Census Question about Ancestry: What Did It Tell Us?', Demography, Vol. 28, No. 3 (August 1991), pp. 414, 421.
  12. ^ Stanley Lieberson and Lawrence Santi, 'The Use of Nativity Data to Estimate Ethnic Characteristics and Patterns', Social Science Research, Vol. 14, No. 1 (1985), pp. 44–6.
  13. ^ Stanley Lieberson and Mary C. Waters, 'Ethnic Groups in Flux: The Changing Ethnic Responses of American Whites', Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, Vol. 487, No. 79 (September 1986), pp. 82–86.
  14. ^ Mary C. Waters, Ethnic Options: Choosing Identities in America (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1990), p. 36.
  15. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21.
  16. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21.
  17. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21.
  18. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-01-21.
  19. ^ "2016 Election Results: President Live Map by State, Real-Time Voting Updates". Election Hub. Retrieved 6 April 2018.
  20. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of June 10, 2014" (PDF). Maine Bureau of Corporations. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2014-10-30.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 6 April 2018.

External links

Coordinates: 43°49′N 70°20′W / 43.81°N 70.33°W

Bradbury Mountain State Park

Bradbury Mountain State Park is a public recreation area in the town of Pownal, Cumberland County, Maine, managed by the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry. The state park covers 730 acres (300 ha).

Bridgton, Maine

Bridgton is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 5,210 at the 2010 census. A resort area in Maine's Lakes Region, Bridgton is home to Bridgton Academy, a private preparatory school, and the Four on the Fourth Road Race.

Bridgton is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area.

Brunswick, Maine

Brunswick is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 20,278 at the 2010 United States Census. Part of the Portland-South Portland-Biddeford metropolitan area, Brunswick is home to Bowdoin College, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum, and the Maine State Music Theatre. It was formerly home to the U.S. Naval Air Station Brunswick, which was permanently closed on May 31, 2011.

Chute River

The Chute River is in Cumberland County, Maine, United States and connects Long Lake to Brandy Pond in Naples. It is spanned by U.S. Route 302 at the Naples Bridge, formerly the Naples Swing Bridge until 2012.

Cousins Island

Cousins Island is an island in Casco Bay within the town of Yarmouth in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. It is listed as a census-designated place, with a population of 490 as of the 2010 census. The CDP is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine Metropolitan Statistical Area.

The island is connected to mainland Maine by a bridge, built in 1955. It is also connected to Chebeague Island by a 15-minute ferry ride on the Chebeague Transportation Company's ferry, the Islander. The island's southwestern peninsula is the site of the Wyman Energy Center, an oil-fired electric power plant capable of producing up to 823 megawatts of electricity. Wyman is a peaking power plant, which means it is only fired up to operate during times of high electricity demand in the region, such as hot summer days.

The island, Cousins River and Littlejohn Island are named after Englishman John Cousins (b. circa 1596, d. 1682), who emigrated from Marlborough, Wiltshire.

Cousins River

The Cousins River is a 4.7-mile-long (7.6 km), primarily tidal river in southern Maine. Rising in the town of Freeport at the junction of Harvey Brook and Merrill Brook, it flows south and forms, for most of its course, the boundary between Freeport and Yarmouth. It ends at the Royal River just west of that river's mouth in Casco Bay.

The river, Cousins Island and Littlejohn Island are named after Englishman John Cousins (b. circa 1596, d. 1682), who emigrated from Marlborough, Wiltshire.

Eagle Island (Casco Bay, Maine)

Eagle Island is an island in Maine's Casco Bay and the site of the retirement home of the polar explorer Admiral Robert Peary (1856-1920). The island and home are preserved as the Eagle Island State Historic Site.

Freeport, Maine

Freeport is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 7,879 at the 2010 census. Known for its numerous outlet stores, Freeport is home to L.L. Bean, Wolfe's Neck Woods State Park, and the Desert of Maine.

Freeport is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area.

Gorham, Maine

Gorham is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 16,381 at the 2010 census. The 2012 estimate of Gorham's population was 16,667. In addition to its urban village center known as Gorham Village or simply "the Village," the town encompasses a number of smaller, unincorporated villages and hamlets with distinct historical identities, including South Gorham, West Gorham, Little Falls, White Rock, and North Gorham. Gorham is home to one of the three campuses of the University of Southern Maine. In 2013, Gorham was voted second best town in Maine after Hampden by a financial website.

Gorham is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area.

Initially named Narragansett Number 7, the village was renamed Gorhamtown Plantation in honor of the famous New England Ranger John Gorham I, the great grandfather of John Gorham 4th.

Harraseeket River

The Harraseeket River is a 3.2-mile-long (5.1 km) tidal river in the town of Freeport within the U.S. state of Maine. It forms a northern arm of Casco Bay.

Libby River

The Libby River is a 5.2-mile-long (8.4 km) river in the town of Scarborough, Maine, in the United States. It is tidal in its lower reaches, and it is a tributary of the Scarborough River, joining it just above that river's mouth at the Atlantic Ocean.

Little River (Casco Bay)

The Little River is a 4.1-mile-long (6.6 km) tributary of Casco Bay in the U.S. state of Maine. The river is located entirely within the town of Freeport.

Muddy River (Sebago Lake)

The Muddy River is a 5.3-mile-long (8.5 km) tributary of Sebago Lake in the U.S. state of Maine.

National Register of Historic Places listings in Cumberland County, Maine

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Cumberland County, Maine.

This is intended to be a complete list of the properties and districts on the National Register of Historic Places in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. Latitude and longitude coordinates are provided for many National Register properties and districts; these locations may be seen together in a map.There are 239 properties and districts listed on the National Register in the county, including 12 National Historic Landmarks. 148 of these properties and districts, including 5 National Historic Landmarks, are located outside Portland, and are listed here, while the properties and districts in Portland are listed separately. Two once-listed properties outside Portland have been removed.

This National Park Service list is complete through NPS recent listings posted July 12, 2019.

Northwest River (Maine)

The Northwest River is an 8.9-mile-long (14.3 km) tributary of Sebago Lake in Maine.

Scarborough, Maine

Scarborough is a town in Cumberland County on the southern coast of the U.S. state of Maine. The town is a coastal resort area. Located about 7 miles (11 km) south of Portland, Scarborough is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area. The population was 18,919 at the 2010 census.

Sebago Lake State Park

Sebago Lake State Park is a public recreation area encompassing 1,342 acres (543 ha) on the north shore of Sebago Lake in the towns of Naples and Casco, Cumberland County, Maine. It opened in 1938 as one of Maine's original five state parks. The mostly forested park is divided into east and west sections by the Songo River. It is managed by the Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.

Sticky River

The Sticky River is a 3.4-mile-long (5.5 km) river that flows into the southern end of Sebago Lake in Standish, Maine.

Stroudwater River

The Stroudwater River is a 15.2-mile-long (24.5 km) river located mostly in Cumberland County, Maine. The river begins as a small stream at Duck Pond in Buxton and grows as it flows through Buxton, Gorham, Westbrook, and finally Portland before emptying into the Fore River at Stroudwater falls in Portland's Stroudwater neighborhood. Several smaller streams flow into the river in Buxton and Gorham, including Deering Brook, Gully Brook, Fogg Brook and Silver Brook.

The Fore River Sanctuary, a nature preserve with footpaths and wooden bridges over wetlands, is located near the confluence of the Stroudwater and Fore rivers.

Places adjacent to Cumberland County, Maine
Municipalities and communities of Cumberland County, Maine, United States
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